Get Pregnant Naturally

Get Pregnant Naturally
".....Utilizing Traditional Chinese Medicine in Tonifying Energy flow to the Reproductive System Channels In Men and Women for Natural Conception, including Couple Who were diagnosed with Unexplained causes of Infertility...." Chantel M.

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Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Soy and Sex Hormones in healthy adult male

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Effects of replacing meat with soyabean in the diet on sex hormone concentrations in healthy adult males." by Habito RC, Montalto J, Leslie E, Ball MJ. (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.). A randomised crossover dietary intervention study was performed to evaluate the effects of replacing meat protein in the diet with a soyabean product, tofu, on blood concentrations of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, androstanediol glucuronide, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and the free androgen index (total testosterone concentration/SHBG concentration x 100; FAI). Forty-two healthy adult males aged 35-62 years were studied, researchers found that Adjusting for weight change revealed SHBG to be 8.8% higher on the tofu diet (mean difference 3 (95% CI 0.7, 5.2) nmol/l; P = 0.01) and testosterone:oestradiol to be significantly lower, P = 0.049). Thus, replacement of meat protein with soyabean protein, as tofu, may have a minor effect on biologically-active sex hormones, which could influence prostate cancer risk. However, other factors or mechanisms may also be responsible for the different incidence rates in men on different diets.

Soy and Platelet Aggregation

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "[Hypolipidemic action of soy fiber and its effects on platelet aggregation and coagulation time in rats]."[Article in Chinese] by Wang C, Zhao L, Chen Y. (Department of Life Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan.), researchers found that The authors believed that hypolipidemic effect of SF was achieved by lowering LDL-C in animals with hyperlipemia, and lowering of blood lipid and FB were major reasons to make animals fed with SF-added feed lower their platelet aggregation and prolong their clotting time.

Soy and Ovarian Function

Posted Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Effects of soy foods on ovarian function in premenopausal women." by Wu AH, Stanczyk FZ, Hendrich S, Murphy PA, Zhang C, Wan P, Pike MC. Posted in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, twenty healthy cycling premenopausal women (ten Asians and ten non-Asians) participated in a 7-month soy intervention study which was designed to investigate the effect of supplementation on ovarian function. Asian soy foods (tofu, soymilk, green soybean peas) in the amount of approximately 32 mg of isoflavones per day were added to the women's diets for three menstrual cycles, researchers found that supplementation using traditional soy foods reduced serum oestradiol levels among Asian participants in this study. Differences in the type of soy products (i.e. traditional soy foods versus soy protein products), amount of isoflavones, and race/ethnicity of participants may have contributed to the divergent results. Larger soy intervention studies designed specifically to include participants of different race/ethnicities and using both traditional soy foods and soy protein products providing comparable doses of isoflavones are needed to definitively determine the effect of soy on ovarian function

Soy and Premenopausal Women and Men

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by The American Society for Nutritional Sciences J. Nutr. 132:570S-573S, 2002

In a study of "Hormonal Effects of Soy in Premenopausal Women and Men" by Mindy S. Kurzer
Posted in The Journal of Nutrition, researcher found that the reported studies suggest that soy consumption exerts small effects on hormones in both men and premenopausal women. Although these effects are generally in a beneficial direction, their clinical significance is yet to be established. The largest observed effects have been reductions in urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites in women. Future studies should focus on elucidating the responsible components and the optimal forms and doses as well as the dietary, environmental and genetic factors that influence particular subgroups to respond to soy. These factors may include ethnicity as well as individual phytoestrogen metabolism. Finally, it is of great importance to establish the clinical relevance of these small differences.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Soy and Cognitive Function

Posted by Chantel M. Abstract contributed by The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry

In a new study of "Soy isoflavones and cognitive function." by Yoon-Bok Lee, Hyong Joo Lee, Heon Soo Sohn in The Journal of nutritional biochemistry (2005) Volume: 16, Issue: 11, Pages: 641-649
, researchers found that ovariectomized female rats were fed a diet high in soy isoflavones for 10 months. researchers found that in abstract although data from humans, cultures, and animal models are currently insufficient for elucidating the metabolism of soy isoflavone actions on cognitive function and the nervous system, we suggest two putative pathways; (1) an estrogen receptor-mediated pathway and (2) via the inhibition of tyrosine kinase, in particular by genistein, which is one of the soy isoflavones. Although soy isoflavones appear to have a positive effect on brain function, further research is needed to determine not only the efficacy but also the safety of soy isoflavones on the nervous system and cognitive function.

Soy and Anxiety

In a study of :Soy's health benefits may not extend to reduced anxiety" Posted in American Psychological Association April 2005, Vol 36, No. 4, by comparing the behavior of male and female rats on two different soy-rich diets with control groups on a normal diet. Both soy-rich diets contained soy isoflavones--compounds commonly found in over-the-counter soy supplements that are molecularly and structurally similar to estrogen. But the second soy-rich diet also included the carbohydrates, proteins and other nutrients found in whole soybeans and soy milk. The researchers placed each rat in the center of an elevated plus-shaped maze. Two of the maze arms were walled and two were open with a drop of more than 1.5 feet to the floor. The researchers then recorded how often and for how long the rats entered the open arms--a bold act that indicates low anxiety--compared with the closed arms. Males on the soy-rich diets spent less time in the open arms and entered the arms less often than the control males--at levels indicating they were significantly more anxious.
They concluded that the soy-rich diets didn't increase estrogen levels in the proestrus rats. The researchers conjecture that instead the isoflavones enhanced the anxiety-reducing effects of estrogen already in the proestrus rats--a benefit that didn't extend to other females in the study.


Soy and Mushroom Salad

Posted By Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Salt Spring Seed

1 1/2 cups soybeans, soaked
1 Tbsp oil
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 clove garlic, crushed
Salt and pepper to taste
3 stalks celery, chopped
3/4 cup sliced mushrooms
4 scallions, finely chopped

Cook the beans and drain well. Mix together the oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Toss the beans and vegetables in the dressing. Serve chilled.

Serves 4-6.

(Source)


Strawberry Banana Soy Smoothie

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by From Syrie Wongkaew, former About.com Guide posted in about.com

Light yet filling, this strawberry banana soy smoothie keeps me going until lunchtime.

The soy milk can be substituted with rice, almond or normal milk.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Ingredients:
  • 10 strawberries, hulled, washed
  • 2 ripe bananas, peeled, coarsely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups of soy milk
  • 1/4 cup low-fat natural yogurt
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1/2 tsp of vanilla extract
  • 6 ice-cubes
  • Makes 3-4 cups
Preparation:
  1. Place all ingredients into a blender and blend on high for about 40 seconds or until smooth and frothy.
  2. Taste the smoothie and add more honey if necessary. Blend for another 10 seconds.
  3. Pour into glasses and serve immediately.

Monday, August 29, 2011

Soy and Immune system

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 83, No. 5, 1118-1125, May 2006 © 2006 American Society for Nutrition

In a study of "Soy isoflavones modulate immune function in healthy postmenopausal women" by Tracy A Ryan-Borchers, Jean Soon Park, Boon P Chew, Michelle K McGuire, Lisa R Fournier and Kathy A Beerma, researcher found that Isoflavone intervention in postmenopausal women resulted in higher (P < 0.05) B cell populations and lower (P < 0.05) plasma concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-guanosine, an oxidative marker of DNA damage. Isoflavone treatment did not significantly influence concentrations of interferon γ, interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor α, or C-reactive protein in plasma or of 8-isoprostane in urine and concluded that soymilk and supplemental isoflavones modulate B cell populations and appear to be protective against DNA damage in postmenopausal women.


Soy and Insomnia

Posted by Chantel M. contribution by Reuters Health

According to the reported of "Soy may ease sleep problems in older women" in Reuter health in an article of "The estrogen-like compounds found in soy could help postmenopausal women get a better night's sleep", according to a small study with women given isoflavones, researchers found that 90 percent reported "moderate or intense" insomnia at the beginning of the study, while 37 percent did after four months; in the placebo group, the percentages were 95 percent and 63 percent, respectively. Researchers concluded that without knowing the source of postmenopausal insomnia, the researchers cannot say why soy seemed to alleviate it for many of the women taking the isoflavones.

Soy and Weight Loss

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by Northern Advancement Center for Science and Technology, Colabo-Hokkaido, Sapporo 001-0021, Japan.

In a study of "Soybean beta-conglycinin peptone suppresses food intake and gastric emptying by increasing plasma cholecystokinin levels in rats." by Nishi T, Hara H, Tomita F., researchers found that The suppression of food intake by beta-conglycinin peptone was abolished by an intravenous injection of devazepide, a selective peripheral CCK receptor antagonist. The beta-conglycinin peptone infusion strongly suppressed gastric emptying with marked increases in portal CCK levels. We also observed that the beta-conglycinin peptone dose dependently and more potently stimulated CCK release from isolated dispersed mucosal cells of the rat jejunum than did beta-conglycinin itself. This stimulation corresponded to the binding activity of the peptide or protein to solubilized components of the rat jejunum membrane as evaluated by surface plasmon biosensor. They concluded that These results indicate that beta-conglycinin peptone suppresses food intake, and this effect may be due to beta-conglycinin peptone in the lumen stimulating endogenous CCK release with direct acceptance to the intestinal cells.

Soybean may be a good food to suppress your appetite to prevent weight gain, I belive

Soy and Fibroids

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

In a study of "Lignan and isoflavone excretion in relation to uterine fibroids: a case-control study of young to middle-aged women in the United States" by Charlotte Atkinson, Johanna W Lampe, Delia Scholes, Chu Chen, Kristiina Wähälä and Stephen M Schwart, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 84, No. 3, 587-593, September 2006, researchers suggest a modest inverse association between lignan excretion and uterine fibroid risk. Whether this relation represents an effect of lignans per se or of other constituents of lignan-containing foods on the development of uterine fibroids remains to be determined. No association was found between isoflavone excretion and uterine fibroids; however, the intake of soy foods, the primary source of isoflavones, was low in this population.

Sunday, August 28, 2011

Braised Tofu

Posted by Chantel M., recipe contributed by Tofurecipe.com


- 1 pound tofu, firm, cubed
- assorted veggies, broccoli, carrot, mushroom...
- flowerets, zucchini

Sauce Mixture

- Tamari
- Rice Vinegar
- ginger
- garlic powder 3/4 teas.
- garlic salt 1 teas.
- Marinate tofu in sauce mixture for one hour or more (preferably longer).
Braise tofu by adding some sauce mixture in frying pan and lay pieces flat in pan and then cook.
turn over half way through.
Cook tofu until liquid is pretty much gone.
Put it all together and eat.
Yummy!


Hope you guys like it

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Soy and PMS

Posted Chantel M. contributed by science link Japan, gateway to Japan scientific and technical information

Part I
In a Study of "Effect of Soy Isoflavones on Premenstrual Syndrome " by ISHIWATA NAOKO (Atomijoshidaigakutandai) UESUGI SAYO (Tokyo Univ. Agriculture, Dep. Applied Biology and Chemistry, JPN) UEHARA MARIKO (Tokyo Univ. Agriculture, Dep. Applied Biology and Chemistry, JPN) in the Soy Protein Research of Two hundred forty-two young women aged 18-21 yrs, fifty six women with premenstrual symptoms were identified by questionnaire and participated in the randomized, double-blind, crossover intervention trial with IF and placebo for 8-menstrual cycles, researchers found that IF supplements may be an effective treatment for the reduction of physical symptoms of PMS. (author abst.)

Part II
In a Study of "Effect of Soy Isoflavones on Premenstrual Syndrome Part II" by ISHIWATA NAOKO (Atomijoshidaigakutandai) UESUGI SAYO (Tokyo Univ. Agriculture, Dep. Applied Biology and Chemistry, JPN) UEHARA MARIKO (Tokyo Univ. Agriculture, Dep. Applied Biology and Chemistry, JPN) in the Soy Protein Research of Fifty-four young women with premenstrual syndrome participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial. They were divided into two groups: Twenty-eight women took a 20mg/day isoflavone supplement (20mg/day IF group); 26 women took a 40mg/day isoflavone supplement (40mg/day IF group), researcher found that there was a trend toward a decrease in the estradiol/progesterone ratio among women with moderate to serious symptoms, and a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) among women with serious symptoms. Independent of symptom severity, the serotonin tended to increase among individuals in the 40mg/day IF group. Prolactin tended to increase as symptom severity increased, and was significantly lower in the 40mg/day IF group compared to the placebo among those with severe symptoms. Sex-hormone binding globulin levels tended to increase among the 40mg/day IF group when symptoms were severe. Only twenty percent of subjects were equol producers, similar to the level observed among Westerners. (author abst.)

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Soy and Menstrual Cramps and Pain (Negative effects)

In a study of "Associations of menstrual pain with intakes of soy, fat and dietary fiber in Japanese women" by C Nagata, K Hirokawa, N Shimizu and H Shimizu, Guarantor: C Nagata and Contributors: CN designed and coordinated the study and had overall responsibility for data analysis and writing the paper. KH and NS coordinated for sample collection. HS helped to design the study and undertook data interpretation. A total of 276 Japanese women aged 19–24 years with Intakes of nutrients and foods including soy products, isoflavones, fats and dietary fiber were estimated by a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Severity of menstrual pain was assessed by the multidimensional scoring system reported by Andersch and Milson. The result of the finding indicated that Intake of dietary fiber was significantly inversely correlated with the menstrual pain scale (r=-0.12, P=0.04) after controlling for age, smoking status, age at menarche and total energy intake. Neither soy nor fat intake was significantly correlated with menstrual pain after controlling for the covariates. Researchers concluded that
The cross-sectional difference in dietary fiber intake across the level of menstrual pain was small in magnitude but warrants further studies.





Basic Vanilla Soymilk

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Soy Milk Recipe Canada, Soy Milk Recipes. Previous posted in Alpha health products

Ingredients
  • 1 measuring cup - Soybeans
  • 0.8L-1.3L - Water
  • 1/2 teaspoon - sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon - vanilla extract
  • 3 tablespoons - cane sugar
Directions
  1. Using soybeans and water, make soymilk according to instruction manual. (How to make soy milk at home)
  2. Once soybean has been made, add sea salt, vanilla extract, and sugar directly to Soyabella's carafe while soymilk is hot.
  3. Stir thoroughly, cool before serving.
  4. TIP: Many flavorings can be added to your soymilk. Don't be afraid to experiment. Try other flavorings other than vanilla and other sweeteners in place of white sugar. Agave Nectar, molasses, brown rice syrup, date sugar, carob powder, and malted barley syrup are some other sweeteners that can be used.
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Friday, August 26, 2011

Soy and Kidney function In diabetes

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2003) 57, 1292–1294. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601688

In a study of "Beneficiary effect of dietary soy protein on lowering plasma levels of lipid and improving kidney function in type II diabetes with nephropathy" by L Azadbakht, R Shakerhosseini, S Atabak, M Jamshidian, Y Mehrabiand A Esmaill-Zadeh, researchers found that The significant reduction that was seen in proteinuria in this study could be attributed to reduction of glomerular filtration rate, intraluminal pressure and increased glomerular resistance. The different results in different studies could contribute to the different amounts of protein consumption and the existence of patients in different stages of nephropathy. As a result of reduction in urinary urea nitrogen and proteinuria, it is estimated that soy protein intake could improve renal function in these patients. This point is noticeable in kidney disease also. Although soy-protein intake may effectively decrease the hyperfiltration that antedates the onset of proteinuria in type I and type II diabetes, it may not protect from the hypertensive damage to the kidneys that commonly occurs in type II diabetes patients.

Remember that study only provide us the evident of potential use of soy in treating the indicated diseases, clinical trial will need to confirm them.
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Soy and Lung Cancer of Non smokers

Post by Chantel M. Contributed by 2010 American Society for Nutrition, previous posted in The American Journals in Clinical Nutrition

In a study of Isoflavone intake and risk of lung cancer: a prospective cohort study in Japan" by Taichi Shimazu, Manami Inoue, Shizuka Sasazuki, Motoki Iwasaki, Norie Sawada, Taiki Yamaji, and Shoichiro Tsugane, for the Japan Public Health Center–based Prospective Study Group. The result during 11 y (671,864 person-years) of follow-up, we documented 481 male and 178 female lung cancer cases. In men we found an inverse association between isoflavone intake and risk of lung cancer in never smokers (n = 13,051; multivariate HR in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of isoflavone intake: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.90; P for trend = 0.024) but not in current or past smokers. A similar, nonsignificant inverse association was seen in never-smoking women (n = 38,211; HR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.41, 1.10; P for trend = 0.135). We also tested effect modification by smoking status (P for interaction = 0.085 in men and 0.055 in men and women combined), researchers concluded that In a large-scale, population-based, prospective study in Japan, isoflavone intake was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in never smokers.

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Thursday, August 25, 2011

Soy and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing hormone (LH)

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US national library of medicine, National Insitute of health

In a study of "Effects of soy protein and isoflavones on circulating hormone concentrations in pre- and post-menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis." by Hooper L, Ryder JJ, Kurzer MS, Lampe JW, Messina MJ, Phipps WR, Cassidy A., researchers found that Forty-seven studies (11 of pre-, 35 of post- and 1 of perimenopausal women) were included. In premenopausal women, meta-analysis suggested that soy or isoflavone consumption did not affect primary outcomes estradiol, estrone or SHBG concentrations, but significantly reduced secondary outcomes FSH and LH [by approximately 20% using standardized mean difference (SMD), P = 0.01 and 0.05, respectively]. Menstrual cycle length was increased by 1.05 days (95% CI 0.13, 1.97, 10 studies), and concluded that Isoflavone-rich soy products decrease FSH and LH in premenopausal women and may increase estradiol in post-menopausal women. The clinical implications of these modest hormonal changes remain to be determined.

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Soy as Estrogen Agonists/Antagonists.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by the Americal Journal of clinic nutrition
In a study of "Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women" by A Cassidy, S Bingham and KD Setchell, Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Cambridge, UK. Soy protein (60 g containing 45 mg isoflavones) given daily for 1 mo significantly (P < 0.01), researchers found that Plasma estradiol concentrations increased in the follicular phase and cholesterol concentrations decreased 9.6%. Similar responses occur with tamoxifen, an antiestrogen undergoing clinical trial as a prophylactic agent in women at high risk for breast cancer. These effects are presumed to be due to nonsteroidal estrogens of the isoflavone class, which behave as partial estrogen agonists/antagonists.
Now you have the evidence of soy as estrogen agonist, it should be beneficiary for women with menstrual disorder, but further studies and clinical trials should be done to confirm the result.

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Baked Tofu

There is one more recipe of tofu. Posted by Chantel M. recipe contributed by Savvy vegetarian. (Source)

4 Servings

Total Prep And Cook Time: 90 Minutes

Nutrition Data Per Serving: 166 calories, 7g carbohydrate, 10g fat, 266mg sodium, 2g dietary fiber, 14g protein, 57% RDV calcium, iron 14% RDV. Very low in cholesterol, good source of protein, Vit. K & selenium, very good source of calcium & manganese. Estimated glycemic load: 4.

Baked Tofu Ingredients

  • 1 water pack block extra firm tofu
  • Marinade:
  • 1 Tbsp rice vinegar or balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp Tamari soy sauce
  • 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup
  • 1 Tbsp minced fresh ginger OR 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 Tbsp minced fresh garlic OR 1/2 tsp powdered garlic
  • 1/2 cup chopped scallions
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp coriander
  • pinch cayenne
  • fresh ground black pepper

Marinating and Baking the Tofu:

  1. Put all the marinade ingredients in a jar, screw the lid on tight, and shake until well mixed
  2. Press the block of tofu between an old dishtowel or paper towels to remove any excess water
  3. Slice the tofu in 1/2 inch slices, and lay side-by-side in a flat baking pan
  4. Spread the marinade over and under the tofu slices
  5. Cover and marinate 1 hour or more in the fridge, turning once or twice if possible
  6. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees
  7. Drain off the excess marinade
  8. Bake 30 minutes
  9. Turn over halfway through the baking
  10. Less baking time, if it looks very done halfway thruough
  11. Broil for a few minutes on each side to give the baked tofu a crusty finish
Baked tofu keeps well in a tightly sealed container in the fridge. We suggest doubling the recipe so you'll have plenty left over for future quick & easy meals. See below for 10 Tasty Things to Do with Baked Tofu.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Soy and High Blood Pressure

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Dietary protein and blood pressure: a systematic review." by
Altorf-van der Kuil W, Engberink MF, Brink EJ, van Baak MA, Bakker SJ, Navis G, van 't Veer P, Geleijnse JM., researchers concluded that evidence suggests a small beneficial effect of protein on BP, especially for plant protein. A blood pressure lowering effect of protein may have important public health implications. However, this warrants further investigation in randomized controlled trials. Furthermore, more data are needed on protein from specific sources in relation to BP, and on the protein-BP relation in population subgroups.

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Soy and Inflammation

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Soy consumption, markers of inflammation, and endothelial function: a cross-over study in postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome." by Azadbakht L, Kimiagar M, Mehrabi Y, Esmaillzadeh A, Hu FB, Willett WC., with objective to determine the effects of soy consumption on markers of inflammation and endothelial function in postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome, in randomized cross-over clinical trial included 42 postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome researchers conclude that short-term soy nut consumption reduced some markers of inflammation and increased plasma nitric oxide levels in postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome.

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Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Soy and Bladder cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by American Association for cancer research.

According to a study of " Soy Phytochemicals Prevent Orthotopic Growth and Metastasis of Bladder Cancer in Mice by Alterations of Cancer Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis and Tumor Angiogenesis." by Ajita V. Singh, Adrian A. Franke, George L. Blackburn, and Jin-Rong Zhou, researchers indicated in the section of "Effects of soy phytochemicals on orthotopic growth and metastasis of bladder tumors", the intrabladder 253J B-V human bladder tumor model was used as a clinically relevant in vivo model to evaluate the effects of SPC and genistin on tumor growth and metastasis. We used genistin because it is the natural form of genistein in soy. We used SPC because it represents soy phytochemicals that are consumed by humans. Dietary soy treatments did not significantly reduce body weight or food intake (data not shown). The effects of dietary treatments on tumor growth and metastasis are shown in Fig. 5 . Tumors from those treated with SPC and genistin were reduced by 52% (P < 0.05) and 54% (P < 0.05), respectively, compared with the control group ( Fig. 5A).....
In the section of "Effects of soy phytochemicals on tumor apoptosis, angiogenesis, and proliferation." researchers also indicated that tumor cell apoptotic index and tumor angiogenesis were measured by TUNEL assay and factor VIII staining, respectively. Apoptotic indices of primary tumors in mice treated with SPC and genistin were significantly increased by 263% (P < 0.01) and 265% (P < 0.01), respectively, whereas microvessel densities of primary tumors in mice treated with SPC and genistin were significantly reduced by 35% (P < 0.05) and 50% (P < 0.05), respectively, compared with the control.

In conclusion, researchers wrote that we found that genistin and SPC significantly inhibited the growth of a poorly differentiated human bladder tumor associated with induction of tumor cell apoptosis and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In particular, SPC, but not genistin, significantly inhibited lung metastases and reduced NF-κB expression and circulating level of IGF-I. The results from this study, together with our previous studies, suggest that SPC may contain potent antimetastasis component(s). The results from our studies suggest further clinical studies should be warranted to apply soy phytochemicals, such as SPC, as a potent prevention regimen for bladder cancer progression. This orthotopic human bladder tumor model also provides a clinically relevant experimental tool for assessing potential preventive activity of other dietary components against bladder tumor growth and metastasis.

Now, we have contradiction evidences that soy can cause and treat bladder cancer in studies. Further of clarification should be necessary.
You can view the complete research here

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Soy Allergic Effects

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by University of Nebraska-Lincoln

According to the study of A FARRP Ph.D. student, Ben Remington, under the joint supervision of Profs. Taylor and Baumert, has initiated research on soybean allergens. The clinical picture on the reactivity of soy-allergic individuals with various soy proteins is far from clear. Different individuals seem to react to different soy allergens although differences also appear to be influenced by the selection of methods and perhaps even by the selection of soy-based materials to use in the research. Thus far, research by other groups has determined that Gly m 5 and Gly m 6 (conglycinin and glycinin, respectively) are major soybean allergens. Gly m 3 (profilin) and Gly m 4 (a Bet v 1 homologue) are other important soy allergens. An oleosin from soy, called P34, is another potential soy allergen. The soy trypsin inhibitor (STI) has been identified as a minor allergen. FARRP is particularly interested in the levels of these allergenic proteins in various soy-based ingredients. (Source)

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People with soy allergy should be careful as it can cause anaphylactic shock, the serious reaction that should see a physician or go to the emergency room immediately as it can be fatal if not treated immediately.
In fact, many people with soy allergy can tolerate small amount of soy protein.

Products containing soy protein include:

  • edamame
  • miso
  • natto
  • shoyu sauce
  • soy (soy albumin, soy fiber, soy flour, soy grits, soy milk, soy nuts, soy sprouts)
  • soya
  • soybean (curd, granules)
  • soybean butter
  • soy protein (concentrate, isolate)
  • soy milk
  • soy sauce, tamari
  • tempeh
  • textured vegetable protein (TVP)
  • tofu

The following food additives may contain soy protein:

  • chocolate
  • hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP)
  • flavoring (including natural and artificial)
  • canned chicken broth
  • vegetable broth, gum, protein, and starch
  • bouillon cubes (beef, chicken, vegetable, etc.)
  • lecithin
  • caramel color
  • vegetable
  • vegetable oil
  • methylcellulose
  • vegetable fat
  • vegetable oil
  • "natural" flavors
  • mono- and di-glycerides
  • (Source)



Monday, August 22, 2011

Soy Treatment for Prostate Cancer

Posted by Chantel M.

According to the study of "Lycopene and soy isoflavones in the treatment of prostate cancer." by Vaishampayan U, Hussain M, Banerjee M, Seren S, Sarkar FH, Fontana J, Forman JD, Cher ML, Powell I, Pontes JE, Kucuk O. of population included 71 eligible patients who had 3 successive rising PSA levels or a minimum PSA of 10 ng/ml at 2 successive evaluations prior to starting therapy. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive a tomato extract capsule containing 15 mg of lycopene alone (n = 38) or together with a capsule containing 40 mg of a soy isoflavone mixture (n = 33) twice daily orally for a maximum of 6 mo. One patient on the lycopene arm did not receive therapy due to his inability to ingest the study pill. There was no decline in serum PSA in either group qualifying for a partial or complete response. However, 35 of 37 (95%) evaluable patients in the lycopene group and 22 of 33 (67%) evaluable patients in the lycopene plus soy isoflavone group achieved stable disease described as stabilization in serum PSA level, researchers found that that lycopene and soy isoflavones have activity in prostate cancer patients with PSA relapse disease and may delay progression of both hormone-refractory and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. However, there may not be an additive effect between the 2 compounds when taken together. Future studies are warranted to further investigate the efficacy of lycopene and soy isoflavones in prostate cancer as well as the mechanism of potential negative interaction between them.

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Soy and The Adverse Effects in Patients with Prostate Cancer

Posted by Chantel M.

In a study of "Soy isoflavones in conjunction with radiation therapy in patients with prostate cancer." by Ahmad IU, Forman JD, Sarkar FH, Hillman GG, Heath E, Vaishampayan U, Cher ML, Andic F, Rossi PJ, Kucuk O. Forty-two patients with prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 200 mg soy isoflavone (Group 1) or placebo (Group 2) daily for 6 mo beginning with the first day of radiation therapy, which was administered in 1.8 to 2.5 Gy fractions for a total of 73.8 to 77.5 Gy. Adverse effects of radiation therapy on bladder, bowel, and sexual function were assessed by a self-administered quality of life questionnaire at 3 and 6 mo. Only 26 and 27 patients returned completed questionnaires at 3 and 6 mo, respectively. At each time point, urinary, bowel, and sexual adverse symptoms induced by radiation therapy were decreased in the soy isoflavone group compared to placebo group. At 3 mo, soy-treated patients had less urinary incontinence, less urgency, and better erectile function as compared to the placebo group. At 6 mo, the symptoms in soy-treated patients were further improved as compared to the placebo group. These patients had less dripping/leakage of urine (7.7% in Group 1 vs. 28.4% in Group 2), less rectal cramping/diarrhea (7.7% vs. 21.4%), and less pain with bowel movements (0% vs. 14.8%) than placebo-treated patients. There was also a higher overall ability to have erections (77% vs. 57.1%), researcher concluded that soy isoflavones taken in conjunction with radiation therapy could reduce the urinary, intestinal, and sexual adverse effects in patients with prostate cancer.

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Soy and The Adverse Effects Associated with Chemotherapy

Posted by Chantel M.

In a study of "Soy isoflavones ameliorate the adverse effects of chemotherapy in children.", by
Tacyildiz N, Ozyoruk D, Yavuz G, Unal E, Dincaslan H, Dogu F, Sahin K, Kucuk O." As Nine cycles of chemotherapy were administered without genistein and 57 cycles with genistein. Patients experienced less myelosuppression, mucositis, and infection when they received genistein with chemotherapy. During supplementation, serum genistein levels were 2 to 6 times higher compared to presupplementation levels, researchers found that Patients who received abdominal radiation reported less pain and diarrhea when they took the genistein supplement. Further clinical investigation of soy isoflavones in pediatric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiation should be conducted.

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Soy, Fermentation Increases the Bioavailability of Isoflavones Effects

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, 110 East Warren, Detroit, MI 48201, USA. djuricz@karmanos.org

According to the study of "Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on markers of oxidative stress in men and women." by Djuric Z, Chen G, Doerge DR, Heilbrun LK, Kucuk O., Researchers found that the result indiacted that Blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals for 3 weeks from the women taking 50-mg isoflavones once daily and the men taking 50-mg isoflavones twice daily. Plasma levels of genistein and daidzein increased after supplementation with maximal levels occurring at 2 weeks for the women while levels in men kept increasing over the 3 weeks of study. There was wide variation between individuals in the levels of isoflavones achieved. Mean levels of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-OHmdU) in DNA from nucleated blood cells decreased after 1 week of supplementation in the women, with a decrease of 47% in mean 5-OHmdU levels after 3 weeks. In men, mean 5-OHmdU levels did not decrease until after 3 weeks of supplementation, at which there was 61% decrease. Mean plasma levels of 8-isoprostanes were not changed appreciably in either men or women.. They concluded that These pilot results suggest that soy isoflavone supplementation decreases levels of oxidative DNA damage in humans, and this may be a mechanism behind the cancer-preventive effects of soy isoflavones.

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How to make creamier (thicker) soy milk

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by soymilkmaker.com

Use 100 grams of soybeans instead of 70 grams. Note that machines shipped after March, 2002 includes a 100-gram Measure Cup. You can check your User's Manual to confirm this. Adding between one and two tablespoons (1/16 to 1/8 cup) of rice or oats (oatmeal, oat bran, quick oats) to soaked soybeans will make thicker soy milk. There are detailed recipes packaged with your SoyaJoy Soy Milk Maker. Rice needs to be soaked for the same amount of time as soybeans, but oatmeal or quick oats can be added without soaking.

Soy milk recipe -- tastes like Edensoy

  • Soak one measure of dry soybeans for 6 to 12 hours.
  • Load and run soymilk maker as per the directions that came with the machine.
  • Cool the milk in the refrigerator till it is at least lukewarm.
  • Add 1/4 tsp. of salt.
  • Add 2 Tbs. of sugar.
  • Add 3 Tbs. of Barley Malt.
  • Add 1 Tbs. Of Vanilla flavoring.

Each batch yields approx. 1/3 gallon of soy milk. I typically make 2 batches at a time and store it in a plastic container in the refrigerator. (Source)

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Sunday, August 21, 2011

Soy and Hormonal Effects

Posted by Chantel M.

In a study of " Potential risks and benefits of phytoestrogen-rich diets." by Cassidy A. (Biosciences Division, Unilever Research, Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire, UK, MK 44 ILQ. aedincassidy@clara.co.uk), researcher indicated that it is known that dietary phytoestrogens are metabolised by intestinal bacteria, absorbed, conjugated in the liver, circulated in plasma and excreted in urine. Recent studies have addressed quantitatively what happens to isoflavones following ingestion--with pure compound and stable isotope data to compliment recent pharmacokinetic data for soy foods. The limited studies conducted so far in humans clearly confirm that soya isoflavones can exert hormonal effects. These effects may be of benefit in the prevention of many of the common diseases observed in Western populations (such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis) where the diet is typically devoid of these biologically active naturally occurring compounds, but concluded However since biological effects are dependent on many factors including dose, duration of use, protein binding affinity, individual metabolism and intrinsic oestrogenic state, further clinical studies are necessary to determine the potential health effects of these compounds in specific population groups. However we currently know little about age related differences in exposure to these compounds and there are few guidelines on optimal dose for specific health outcomes.

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Soy and physiology, and implications for human health

Posted Chantel M.

In a study of " Phytoestrogens: the biochemistry, physiology, and implications for human health of soy isoflavones." by Setchell KD. researcher indicated that it is recognized that there are many plant-derived bioactive nonnutrients that can confer significant health benefits. Among these phytochemicals is the broad class of nonsteroidal estrogens called phytoestrogens, and in the past decade there has been considerable interest in the role of isoflavones because of their relatively high concentrations in soy protein. The isoflavones in modest amounts of ingested soy protein are biotransformed by intestinal microflora, are absorbed, undergo enterohepatic recycling, and reach circulating concentrations that exceed by several orders of magnitude the amounts of endogenous estrogens and concluded that these phytoestrogens and their metabolites have many potent hormonal and nonhormonal activities that may explain some of the biological effects of diets rich in phytoestrogens.

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Saturday, August 20, 2011

Soy and Liver Cancer

Posted by Chantel M.

According to the study of THE ROLE OF HAELAN 851® NUTRITION IN RELIEVING LEUKOPENIA IN MICE WITH LIVER CANCER, U.S. Research Reports Inc.
Research Report No. 109, in summary, the article reported that The results of this study suggests that nutritional supplementation with Haelan 851, Platinum Formula, oral nutritional beverage, on a daily basis, for a period of one week before and eight days after the inoculation in mice with ascitic type liver cancer cell H. may relieve the leukopenia induced by cyclophosphamide in varying degrees. The nutritional support with Haelan 851, Platinum Formula, oral nutritional beverage has shown a comparatively evident dose effective relationship. The white cell increased rate eleveted to 86.8% in the group given the undiluted Haelan 851, Platinum Formula, oral liquid for nutritional support. The P value is less than 0.01, which shows a very marked significance.

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Soy and Autoimmune Diseases

Posted by Chantel M. Article Copyright © 1999 by Dr. Morton Walker

In A report from MEDICAL JOURNALIST REPORT OF INNOVATIVE BIOLOGICS in an article of "Ingesting Sterols/Sitosterolins from Plant Fats Induce Potent Human Immunomodulatory Improvement" By Morton Walker, D.P.M., researcher indicated that the clinical experience of Dr. Morris has been verified by studies recorded in the medical literature 1 and by public announcement. For example, Patrick J.D. Bouic, Ph.D., professor of immunology and chief special scientist in the Department of Medical Microbiology at the University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa, has demonstrated that plant sterols and sitosterolins are potent immune modulators capable of reversing abnormalities of the immune system.

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Soy and Tuberculosis and HIV Disease

Posted by Chantel M. Article Copyright © 1999 by Dr. Morton Walker

In A report from MEDICAL JOURNALIST REPORT OF INNOVATIVE BIOLOGICS in an article of "Ingesting Sterols/Sitosterolins from Plant Fats Induce Potent Human Immunomodulatory Improvement" By Morton Walker, D.P.M., researcher indicated that On October 7, 1997, Dr. Bouic's university's press office announced: "The University of Stellenbosch Medical Faculty led by Professor Bouic in the Department of Medical Microbiology, and his colleagues in other departments, have conducted ten years of clinical trials in immune modulation, tuberculosis [TB], and HIV disease. By employing plant fats, patients affected by various autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, certain cancers, and other manifestations of dysfunctional immune systems have experienced dissipation of their health problems. TB patients have recovered from their illnesses more quickly. And infected HIV patients maintain their immune cells over extended periods with no overt signs of illness progression.
Now you have it, double benefits of soy

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Soy and Sex and long-term soy diets

Posted by Chantel M.

In a study of "Sex and long-term soy diets affect the metabolism and excretion of soy isoflavones in humans." by Lu LJ, Anderson KE., researchers found that During 1 mo of daily soy ingestion in a metabolic unit [1.065 L (36 oz) soymilk, providing 80-210 mg of each isoflavone daily], women initially excreted more isoflavone conjugates in urine than did men. Recoveries of conjugates of genistein, daidzein, and equol were 24%, 66%, and 28% of the amounts ingested in women, respectively, and 15%, 47%, and 15%, respectively, of those in men. A progressive decrease in urinary excretion of genistein and daidzein was observed in women but not in men during the study. At least 10% of ingested daidzin was excreted in urine as equol conjugate in one man and one woman after the first soy ingestion. Three more women but no more men developed the ability to produce and excrete large amounts of equol. Absorption rate constants (k(e)) of the isoflavones were estimated to be 0.24-0.50 h(-1). The elimination rates (k(e)) for genistein, daidzein, and equol were 0.1, 0.16, and 0.08 h(-1), respectively, in women and 0.19, 0.25, and 0.13 h(-1), respectively, in men. Thus, the excretion half-life values of genistein were longer in women (7, 4, and 9 h, respectively) than in men (4, 3, and 5 h, respectively) after the first soy ingestion. The excretion half-life shortened progressively in women but lengthened progressively in men over the study period.
They suggested that isoflavone metabolism and disposition were affected by the duration of soy ingestion and by sex.

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Soy and Antioxidants

Posted by Chantel M.


In study of "Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on markers of oxidative stress in men and women." by Djuric Z, Chen G, Doerge DR, Heilbrun LK, Kucuk O., according to the researchers, Blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals for 3 weeks from the women taking 50-mg isoflavones once daily and the men taking 50-mg isoflavones twice daily. Plasma levels of genistein and daidzein increased after supplementation with maximal levels occurring at 2 weeks for the women while levels in men kept increasing over the 3 weeks of study. There was wide variation between individuals in the levels of isoflavones achieved. Mean levels of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-OHmdU) in DNA from nucleated blood cells decreased after 1 week of supplementation in the women, with a decrease of 47% in mean 5-OHmdU levels after 3 weeks. In men, mean 5-OHmdU levels did not decrease until after 3 weeks of supplementation, at which there was 61% decrease. Mean plasma levels of 8-isoprostanes were not changed appreciably in either men or women.
They conclude that These pilot results suggest that soy isoflavone supplementation decreases levels of oxidative DNA damage in humans, and this may be a mechanism behind the cancer-preventive effects of soy isoflavones.

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Friday, August 19, 2011

Soy and thyroid cancer

Posted by Chantel M.
According to the study of " Phytoestrogens and thyroid cancer risk: the San Francisco Bay Area thyroid cancer study. by Horn-Ross PL, Hoggatt KJ, Lee MM.
Phytoestrogen consumption was assessed via a food-frequency questionnaire and a newly developed nutrient database. The consumption of traditional and nontraditional soy-based foods and alfalfa sprouts were associated with reduced risk of thyroid cancer. Consumption of "western" foods with added soy flour or soy protein did not affect risk. Of the seven specific phytoestrogenic compounds examined, the isoflavones, daidzein and genistein [odds ratio (OR), 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-1.1; and OR, 0.65, 95% CI, 0.41-1.0, for the highest versus lowest quintile of daidzein and genistein, respectively] and the lignan, secoisolariciresinol (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35-0.89, for the highest versus lowest quintile) were most strongly associated with risk reduction. Findings were similar for white and Asian women and for pre- and postmenopausal women.
Researchers concluded that our findings suggest that thyroid cancer prevention via dietary modification of soy and/or phytoestrogen intake in other forms may be possible but warrants further research at this time.

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Soy and Endometrial Cancer

According to the study of "Phytoestrogen intake and endometrial cancer risk." by Horn-Ross PL, John EM, Canchola AJ, Stewart SL, Lee MM., the result indicated that Isoflavone (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.93 for the highest versus lowest quartile of exposure) and lignan (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.44 to 1.1) consumptions were inversely related to the risk of endometrial cancer. These associations were slightly stronger in postmenopausal women (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.26 to 0.77 and OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.34 to 0.97 for isoflavones and lignans, respectively). Obese postmenopausal women consuming relatively low amounts of phytoestrogens had the highest risk of endometrial cancer (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 3.3 to 14.5 compared with non-obese postmenopausal women consuming relatively high amounts of isoflavones); however, the interaction between obesity and phytoestrogen intake was not statistically significant., researchers concluded that Some phytoestrogenic compounds, at the levels consumed in the typical American-style diet, are associated with reduced risk of endometrial cancer.

How do you think. It looks like soy has a sex preference?

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Soy can increase the risk of bladder cancer

According to the study of Dietary soy and increased risk of bladder cancer: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.by Sun CL, Yuan JM, Arakawa K, Low SH, Lee HP, Yu MC., researchers found that The soyfood-bladder cancer risk association did not differ significantly between men and women and was not explained by other dietary factors. The soy-cancer relationship became stronger when the analysis was restricted to subjects with longer (> or =3 years) duration of follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological report on the effect of dietary soy on bladder cancer risk.
What do you think?

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Soy and Prostate Health

In a study of "A prospective study of demographics, diet, and prostate cancer among men of Japanese ancestry in Hawaii." by Severson RK, Nomura AM, Grove JS, Stemmermann GN., researchers indicated that Prostate cancer was not associated with any measure of socioeconomic status, including amount of education, type of occupation, and type of residence. There was also no relationship with the number of children, as a surrogate measure of sexual activity. Increased consumption of rice and tofu were both associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer, while consumption of seaweeds was associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. There was no relationship between prostate cancer and the intake of various nutrients, including total fat and total protein. Etiological implications of these associations are discussed, but more research is needed on these dietary factors and the subsequent development of prostate cancer before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

I will share my soy drink with our husband for sure. How about you?

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Soy and Breast Cancer

Posted by Chantel M.

Do you believe that soy can prevent breast cancer?. According to the study of "Dietary genistein negates the inhibitory effect of tamoxifen on growth of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells implanted in athymic mice". by Ju YH, Doerge DR, Allred KF, Allred CD, Helferich WG. Cancer Res. 2002 May 1;62(9):2474-7., researchers found that Dietary genistein negated/overwhelmed the inhibitory effect of TAM on MCF-7 tumor growth, lowered E2 level in plasma, and increased expression of E-responsive genes (e.g., pS2, PR, and cyclin D1). Therefore, caution is warranted for postmenopausal women consuming dietary genistein while on TAM therapy for E-responsive breast cancer.
Now you have it. Prevention is better than treatment, so make and drink your soy drink. It does not taste too bad,

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Soy and Atherosclerosis.

In a study of "Effect of soy nuts on adhesion molecules and markers of inflammation in hypertensive and normotensive postmenopausal women." by Nasca MM, Zhou JR, Welty FK.,
researchers indicated before the reseach that Recently, it was shown that substituting soy nuts for nonsoy protein in a therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) diet lowered systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 9.9% and 6.8%, respectively, in postmenopausal women with hypertension and by 5.2% and 2.9%. After the researching, they concluded the reduction in soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 with soy nuts in women with hypertension suggests an improvement in endothelial function that may reflect an overall improvement in the underlying inflammatory process underlying atherosclerosis.

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Tofu Recipes - Ginger Tofu

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by Tofu recipe.com
Here is another recipe for you, and hope you like it.


- 1 lb of firm tofu
- 1 1/2 ts of fresh, grated ginger
- 1 t of roasted sesame oil
- 1 minced garlic clove
- 2 tb of tamari
- 1 1/4 c of water
- 1 1/2 tb of arrowroot

Slice the tofu into small rectangles of 1/4--1/2-inch thickness and place them in a shallow dish or baking pan.

Mix together the ginger, sesame oil, garlic, tamari and water.
Pour this mixture over the tofu and let it marinate for at least 30 minutes.
(If desired, the tofu may be placed in the refrigerator to marinate for several hours or overnight).

Remove the marinated tofu from the liquid, reserving the liquid to make the sauce.
Place the tofu on a well-oiled cookie sheet and bake at 375 deg for 35-40 minutes, or until the desired crispness is reached (the longer the tofu bakes the firmer and crisper it becomes).

To make the sauce, mix the arrowroot with the marinade.
Place the mixture in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.
Cook, stirring constantly, until thickened.

Ginger Tofu may be served with or without the sauce.
With the sauce, serve it over a bed of rice, millet, buckwheat, or pasta.
Add your favorite stir-fried veggies and you have a colorful or nutritious meal.
Ginger Tofu may also be added to a vegetable stew.

Recipe from: MasterCook

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Thursday, August 18, 2011

Soy and Type II diabetes

In a study of "Soy-protein consumption and kidney-related biomarkers among type 2 diabetics: a crossover, randomized clinical trial." by Azadbakht L, Esmaillzadeh A. the result of the study indicated that Consumption of soy protein reduced urinary urea nitrogen (-0.9 +/- 0.8 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.6 mg/dL, respectively, SD; P < .001), proteinuria (-78 +/- 37 vs. 42 +/- 39 mg/day, respectively, SD; P < .001), blood sodium (-2 +/- 0.04 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.06 mg/dL, respectively, SD; P < .01), and serum phosphorus (-0.03 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.3 mg/dL, respectively, SD; P < .01) compared with animal protein. Serum and urinary creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum calcium, and potassium levels were not significantly changed in soy-protein versus anima-protein consumption. Researchers concluded that Soy-protein consumption reduces proteinuria in type 2 diabetes with nephropathy.

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Phytoestrogen Research and Recipes

A. A True Story Of An Infertile Woman

B. Recipes

( Afraid of Soy? )
1. How to make tofu at home
2. How to make soy milk at home
3. Shrimp and Tofu Pad Thai Recipe
4. Soy Milk Strawberry Smoothie
5. Tofu Recipes - Ginger Tofu
6. How to make creamier (thicker) soy milk
7. Baked Tofu
8. Braised Tofu
9. Strawberry Banana Soy Smoothie
10. Soy and Mushroom Salad
11. Soy on the Grill
12. Blueberry Oatmeal Pancakes
13. Soy and Garlic Marinated Chicken
14. Soy Breakfast Sandwich
15. Soy and Ginger Glazed Salmon Recipe
16. Chinese Barbecued Tofu with Sesame Noodles (Foodservice) Recipe
17. Beef Salad with Ginger Soy Dressing Recipe
18. Soy Ginger Salmon
19. Sundried Tomato Dip
20. Coconut Curried Tofu with Green Jasmine Rice
21. Four Bean Salad
22. Layered Tofu Salad & Warm Soy Sauce Dressing Recipe
23. Soy Sauce Chicken
24. Soy Protein Meatballs
25. Baked Tempeh with Quinoa
26. Creamy Edamame Arugula Soup
27. Black Soybean Ragout
28. Roasted Peach Ice Cream
29. Vanilla / Chocolate Soy Milk Ice Cream Recipe
30. The Best Ugly Turkey
31. Soy Milk Pumpkin Pie a Thankgiving's Recipe
32. Strawberry Ice Cream
33. Sauteed Firm Tofu
34. Stir-Fried Asian Tofu
35. Mapo Tofu
36. Easy Tofu
37. Tofu Scramble
38. Marinated Asparagus
39. Four Bean Salad
40. Stuffed tofu
41. Signature tofu
42. Tofu Delight
43. Stir fry tofu with capsicum
44. Tofu Vermicelli Salad
45. Mushrooms with a Soy Sauce Glaze
46. Grilled Soy-Sesame Asparagus
47. Soybean Casserole
48. Mediterranean Style Soybean Gratin
49. Tangy Tomatoey Soybeans
50. Baked Tofu Spinach Wrap
51. Tofu Parmigiana
52. Coconut Curry Tofu
53. Crispy Barbequed Tofu Slices
54. Hot and Spicy Tofu
55. Berry-nana Soy Smoothie Recipe
56. Chocolate Monkey Peanut Shake with Soy Recipe
57. Cool Banana Chocolate Shake Recipe
58. Creamsicle Spritzer Recipe
59. Mango Banana Soy Smoothie Recipe
65. Cherry Vanilla Chip Muffins
66. Fried Tofu Sticks
67. Tofu Alfredo Sauce
68. Tofu “Punkin” Pie
69. Tofu Flan
70. Herbed Tofu In White Wine Sauce / Pasta Recipe
71. Sauteed Firm Tofu
72. Stir-Fried Asian Tofu
73. Three-alarm Tofu and Mushroom Stir Fry
74. Tofu-Veggie Fry
75. Easy to Make Tofu Recipes
76. Chinese Tofu Recipe - Tofu With Chinese Sausage Recipe
77. The Most Powerful Recipe Soup Diet - Chinese Tofu Recipe
78. Spinach Cheese Rolls
79. Tofu Flan
80. Chinese Tofu Recipe - Tofu With Chinese Sausage Recipe
81. Savory Soy Milk Recipe
82. Chicken With Soy and Hokkien Noodles Recipe
83.  Soy Pasta Can Relieve Menopause Symptoms
84. Pork Recipes - Baked Pork Chops with Soy Sauce and Honey & Fruited Pork Chops
85. How To Select the Right Tofu For Your Recipe
86. A Simple Teriyaki Sauce Recipe
87. Tofu Pizza - Easy Recipe For Low Calorie Diet
88. How to Make Tofu Burgers - Two Easy Recipes
89. Seasoning Foods With Soy Sauce
90. Best Hamburger Recipe Ideas: Mushroom Tofu Burgers
91. How To Make Nutritious Tofu Tastier And Less Bland
92. Tandoori Tofu Masala "Salad"
93. Delicious And Nutritious Japanese Fried Tofu Recipe
94. Chinese Vegetarian Recipes: How to Make Gong Li's Favorite Spinach Tofu in Raise the Red Lantern
95. Secret of Cooking Tofu
96. Dive Into the Exciting World of Flavored Tofu!
97. Soy Chicken and Crispy Noodles
98. All About Firm Tofu and Its Many Wonderful Uses
99. Pork Shish Kebab With Soy-Nut Butter Sauce
100. 2 Quick and Easy Vegetarian Recipes
101. The Advantages of Pressing Tofu
102. Weight Loss Smoothie Recipes
103. Adapt Your Recipes to Vegetarian For Health and Weight Loss
104. Vegan Tempeh Recipe - Ingredients And Directions On How To Make The Perfect Vegan Tempeh
105. Slow Cooker Turkey (& Tempeh) "Meatballs" In a Zesty Tomato-Roasted Red Pepper Sauce
106. Ginger Soy Glazed Mahi Mahi
107. Weight Loss Secret Weapon - Soy Protein Shakes
108.Weight Loss Smoothie Recipes Compilation
109. Soymilk Ice Cream Favorite: Classic Diner Banana Split
110. Tempe Tumis Sapi (Fried Tempeh With Beef)
111. Tofu - A Nutritionally Rich Food You Can Make at Home
112. Vegetarian Breakfast Recipes and Menu Ideas
113. Easy Teriyaki Chicken Recipe
114. How to Make Vietnamese Dipping Sauce for Vegetarians?
115. Shoyu Chicken - The Best Shoyu Chicken Recipe
116. Soy-Based Meat And Dairy Alternatives
117. How to Make a Tasty Diabetic Meal - Herb Soy Pork Roast, Sweet and Sour Cabbage, Chocolate Mousse
118. Recipes For Food Allergy Victims - 3 Simple Recipes To Eat Worry Free
119. Delicious Vegan Whole Wheat Lasagna With Mushrooms Recipe
120. Recipes For Food Allergy Victims - 3 Simple Recipes To Eat Worry Free
121. Versatility of Tofu Shirataki Noodles
122. How To Make Inari Sushi at Home
123. What Makes Tofu Shirataki Noodles?
124. The Creative Tofu Recipe  
125. How To Select the Right Tofu For Your Recipe
126. Delicious Japanese Oden Recipe That Will Keep You Warm In Winter
127. Two Simple and Authentic Udon Recipes
128. Tofu Pizza - Easy Recipe For Low Calorie Diet
129. Best Hamburger Recipe Ideas: Mushroom Tofu Burgers
130. You Can Create A Delicious Tofu Dessert At Home
131.Green Tea Tofu Harumaki (Spring Rolls)
132.Delicious And Nutritious Japanese Fried Tofu Recipe
133. How to Cook Crispy Tofu
134. Soya in Chinese Cuisine: Milk, Beans, and Bean Curd
135. Learning How To Cook Tofu
136. Vegetarian Healthy Meals
137. How to Make Yu Bu Cho Bap (Tofu Wrapped Rice Balls)
138. Tofu Vegetable Stir Fry
139. Some Tips on Easy Tofu Recipes You Can Practice at Home
140. How Diabetics Can Enjoy Sandwiches - Mozzarella-Bologna and Fool Me Tofu Egg Salad Sandwiches Recipe
141. Vegetarian Only - Chili Spiced Tofu Satay
142. The Most Powerful Recipe Soup Diet - Chinese Tofu Recipe
143. Sauted Family Bean Curd
144. Chinese Vegetarian Recipes: How to Make Gong Li's Favorite Spinach Tofu in Raise the Red Lantern
145. Tempeh Versus Tofu - Which Wins the Health Competition?
146. Two Simple Ways of Preparing Tofu
147. Eating Bean Curd With Other Food
148. Tofu - The Wonder Food
149. Vegetarian Lasagna Recipe - Who Doesn't Love Lasagna?
150. Clean Out the Fridge - Goan Tofu Curry
151. Tandoori Tofu Masala "Salad" 
152. Tofu in Chinese Cuisine: An Introduction
153. What to Do With Tofu
154. Chinese Cooking Ingredients - Healthy Spices and Ingredients For a Healthy Cooking
155. How to Make a Delicious Miso Soup With Tofu
156. Healthy Miso Soup Recipe
157. Cooking Japanese - Real Taste of Home Healthy Cookbook Recipes
158. Vegetarian Japanese Cooking - Free Recipe Tips
159.  Learn to Make Japanese Miso Soup
160.Grilled Miso Salmon - Eating Well For Your Diet
161. Grilled Orange Miso Glazed Salmon - A Salmon Dish With an Attitude
162. Turn the Winter Blues to Winter Woo-Hoos
163. Easy Tofu Recipe to Brighten Your Vegetarian Cooking
164. Shirataki Tofu Noodles
165. Adapt Your Recipes to Vegetarian For Health and Weight Loss
166. Quick Three Layer Vegetable Lasagna
167. 10 Health Benefits of Choosing the Chopstick Diet
168. Tofu - History and Health Benefits
169. Savory Soy Milk Recipe
170. Tasty Lactose-Free Ice Cream Recipes
171. Healthy Delicious Breakfast Recipes
172. Milk Allergy, Lactose Intolerance and Soy Allergy
173. Lactose-Free Icing: Does It Exist?
174. Top 5 Weight Loss Smoothie Recipes
175. Smoothie Recipes - Fast Food for Intelligent People
176. 5 Nutritious Add-Ins for Your Crohns Recipes
177. Soyabean Curd Recipe
178. Three Delicious Soya Recipes - Indian Cuisine
179. Blueberry Muffin Jubilee and Savory Black Soybean Loaf
180. What Omega 3 Recipes Are Easy to Follow and Are High in Nutritional Value
181. 5 Nutritious Add-Ins for Your Crohns Recipes
182. Soymilk Uses
183. Vegetarian Jerky and Other Soy Foods
184. Marinated Tofu
185. Easy Tofu Recipe to Brighten Your Vegetarian Cooking
186. Fun Vegetarian Recipe Ideas for Both Kids and Adults
187.All About Silken Tofu
188. Some Tips on Easy Tofu Recipes You Can Practice at Home
189. Fried Tofu - A Modern Twist on a Timeless Classic!
190. Easy Tofu Recipe to Brighten Your Vegetarian Cooking
191. What is Tofu? Top Tips and Info For Cooking Tofu
192. The Creative Tofu Recipe
193. Chinese Vegetarian Recipes: How to Make Gong Li's Favorite Spinach Tofu in Raise the Red Lantern
194. How To Make Nutritious Tofu Tastier And Less Bland
195. Weight Loss Smoothie Recipes
196. Discover the Benefits of Soy Through Soy Weight Loss Shakes
197. Unique Protein Source For Healthy Weight Loss (Recipe Included)
198. Healthy Delicious Breakfast Recipes
199. Make Chinese Food - Easy Delicious Chinese Cooking at Home
200. Vegetarian Chicken Noodle Soup Reviews
201. Vegetarian Potato Soup
202. Vegetarian Foods Are No Longer Boring And Tasteless
203. 2 Vegetarian Soup Ideas
204. Vegetarian Options - Tempeh Vs Tofu
205. Vegetarian Only - Chili Spiced Tofu Satay
206. Enjoy Delicious and Healthy Snacks With Vegan Tofu Salads
207. General Tso's Tofu
208. Vegetarian Lasagna Recipe - Who Doesn't Love Lasagna?
209. Authentic MaPo Tofu
210. How to Cook Crispy Tofu
211. A Non Profit Event and a Tofu Vegan Recipe
212. Delicious And Nutritious Japanese Fried Tofu Recipe
213. 2 Quick and Easy Vegetarian Recipes
214. Easy Tofu Recipe to Brighten Your Vegetarian Cooking
215. How To Prepare Vegan Tofu
216. Make Your Favorite Vegetarian Thai Recipes at Home
217. How To Select the Right Tofu For Your Recipe
218. Enjoy Delicious and Healthy Snacks With Vegan Tofu Salads
219. Top 5 Quick and Easy Vegan Recipes
220. Chicken Laksa Recipe - Make Flavorsome Malaysian Curry Noodles at Home
221. Cooking Tofu In a Clay Pot
222. Malaysian Food - Bak Kut Teh
223. Vegetarian Only - Chili Spiced Tofu Satay
224. Traveling Vegan in Malaysia - Temple Lunch in Kuala Lumpur
225. A Collection of Great Vegetarian and Fruit Juice Recipes
226. Enjoy Delicious and Healthy Snacks With Vegan Tofu Salads
227. Weight Loss Recipes - 7 Proven Fat Melting Foods
228. Chinese Tofu Recipe - Tofu With Chinese Sausage Recipe
229. What Makes Tofu Shirataki Noodles?
230. Tofu - The Vegetarian Protein
231. Easy Vegan Dessert Recipe Featuring Vegan Chocolate
232. The Turbulent History of Tasty Tofu
233.Your Energy Levels Will Soar - Vegetarian Food Recipes
234. Vegan Egg Replacer: How To Substitute Eggs in Recipes
234. Clean Out the Fridge - Goan Tofu Curry
235. Low Calorie Salad Dressing: Green Goddess Salad Dressing
238. How to Make a Delicious and Easy Vegan Tofu Pasta Salad
239. Low-Calorie Salad Dressing: Favorite Creamy Italian
240. Simple Summer Salad - Three Steps to a Quick, Healthy Salad
241. Two Simple Ways of Preparing Tofu
242. Warm Lentil and Shallot Salad With Fresh Spinach
243. The Best Way of Making a Delicious and Low Calorie Salad Entree
244. Salads - A Different Twist On Pasta Salads
245. Salad Toppers - Adding the Perfect Finishing Touch Without Piling on Calories
246. Great Ideas in Making a Healthy Salad
247. Healthy Eating: 6 Easy Tips for Making a Healthy Salad
248. What to Do With Tofu
249. Get Sexy With Tofu - Great Tofu Ideas to Spice Up Your Dinnertime
250. Tofu - A Nutritionally Rich Food You Can Make at Home
251. Tired of Bland Tofu? Discover 6 Quick & Delicious Ways to Prepare Tofu
252. Far Eastern Tofu & Veggie Stir Fry With Special Sauce
253. Anti-Aging - Go Asian on Your Food
254. Exotic Oriental Soups - An Ideal Way To Spice Up Winter Dinners
255. Eat Asian Food For Good Health
256. Dairy-Free and Vegan Potato Salad Recipe With A Kick of An Unexpected Spice
257. Indian Shrimp Curry Recipe - Simple, Delicious, and Perfect
258. Tofu - A Wonderful Vegan Diet Ingredient
259. Ab Diet Recipes That Are Fun and Easy
260. Vegan Appetizers: Two Crowd-Pleasing Dips To Take To Your Next Potluck Party
261. Vegetarian Picnic Food Ideas
262. Chinese Cooking Ingredients - Healthy Spices and Ingredients For a Healthy Cooking
263. 5 Most Commonly Used Ingredient In Chinese Vegetarian Recipes
264. Chinese Vegetarian Recipes - A Mouthful of Flavor
265. Chinese Vegetarian Recipes: How to Make Gong Li's Favorite Spinach Tofu in Raise the Red Lantern
266. Chinese Vegetarian Cuisine - Getting That Authentic Flavor
267. Some Tips on Easy Tofu Recipes You Can Practice at Home
268. The Creative Tofu Recipe
269. Low Fat Vegetarian Recipes That Are Fantastically Delicious!
270. Vegetarian Foods Are No Longer Boring And Tasteless
271. Sauted Family Bean Curd 
272. Vegetable Custard Soup With Bean Curd
273.Spicy Boiled Noodles With Fried Beancurd, Eggs And Fresh Prawns (Mee Rebus)
274.Versatility of Tofu Shirataki Noodles
275. Ma Po Tou Fu (Bean Curd With Chili Sauce)
276. The Most Powerful Recipe Soup Diet - Chinese Tofu Recipe
277. Vegetarian Jerky and Other Soy Foods
278. 2 Vegetarian Soup Ideas
279.  Healthy Chinese Cooking - Some Tips in Learning the Chinese Way of Healthy Cooking
280. Cooking With Tofu - Some Great Culinary Secrets
281.Cooking Recipe For Fast And Simple Vegetarian Dishes
282. Korean Braised Tofu
283.  How to Make Yu Bu Cho Bap (Tofu Wrapped Rice Balls)
284. How to Make Soon Du Bu Jji Gae
285. Authentic Korean Soup Recipes
286. Benefits of Tofu - A Natural Fat-Burning Food!
287. Cooking Tofu In a Clay Pot
288. Hakka Noodles Recipe - An Asian Delight
289. Cooking Japanese - Real Taste of Home Healthy Cookbook Recipes
290. Top 10 Most Popular Asian Foods
291. Traveling Vegan in Malaysia - Temple Lunch in Kuala Lumpur



 


 

More recipes
1. How to Replace Eggs in Vegan Baking
2. Starter Recipes For Vegans

 

C. Phytoestrogen Research

1. Low-Density-Lipoprotein (LDL)
2. Diabetes
3. Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women
4. Premenstrual syndrome
5. Heart Disease
6. Soy and Menstruation
7. Type II diabetes
8. Soy and Breast Cancer
9. Soy and prostate cancer (One for the men)
10. Soy and Atherosclerosis.
11. Soy and Endometrial Cancer
12. Soy and Liver Cancer
13. Soy and Autoimmune Diseases
14. Soy and Tuberculosis and HIV Disease
15. Soy and Sex and long-term soy diets
16. Soy and Antioxidants
17. Soy and thyroid cancer
18. Soy and Hormonal Effects
19. Soy and physiology, and implications for human health
20. Soy, Fermentation Increases the Bioavailability of Isoflavones Effects
21. Soy Treatment for Prostate Cancer (One point for the men)
22. Soy and The Adverse Effects in Patients with Prostate Cancer (One more point for men)
23. Soy and The Adverse Effects Associated with Chemotherapy
24. Soy and Bladder cancer
25. Soy and Inflammation
26. Soy and High Blood Pressure
27. Soy and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing hormone (LH)
28. Soy as Estrogen Agonists/Antagonists.
29. Soy and Lung Cancer of Non smokers
30. Soy and Kidney function In Type II diabetes
31. Soy and Fibroids
32. Soy and Weight Loss
33. Soy and Insomnia
34. Soy and Immune System
35. Soy and Cognitive Function
36. Soy and Anxiety
37. Soy and Sex Hormones in Healthy Adult Male (Less worry for men)
38. soy and Platelet Aggregation
39. Soy and Antifungal Acitivity
40. Soy and Renal Cell Carcinoma
41. Soy and Sex Hormone In Men
42. Soy and plasma sex hormones
43. Soy and Anti-Photoaging
44. Soy and Lipotoxicity in Liver
45. Soy and Menstrual Pain
46. Soy and Menstrual Symptoms
47. Soy and Muscle Protein
48. Soy and Digestive system
49. Soy and Blood Pressure in Obesity
50. Soy and Uric Acid (Hyperuricemia and Gout)
51. Soy and Bacterial Infection
52. Soy and Osteopenia
53. Soy and Depression
54. Soy and Neurobehavioral Effects
55. Soy and Endometriosis
56. Soy and Anti-Wrinkle
57. Soy and C-reactive Protein in post-menopausal women
58. Soy helps to reverse age- and scopolamine-induced memory
59. Soy and Lifestyle-Related Diseases
60. Soy and Alcoholic Liver Disease
61. Soy and Muscle Support
62. Soy and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli
63. Soy and Protection of fluid losses in Escherichia coli
64. Soy and Rheumatoid Arthritis
65. Soy and Alzheimer's disease and Aging
66. Soy and Asthma
67. Soy and Back Pain
68. Soy and Bad Breath
69. Soy and Baldness
70. Soy and Urinary Incontinence
71. Soy and Neurobehavioural Actions
72. Soy and equol and O-desmethylangolensin
73. Soy and Bone Cancer
74. Soy and Climacteric Symptoms
75. Soy and Angiogenesis
76. Soy and Reproductive Organs in Infants
77. Soy and Clomiphene Citrate (Artificial Insemination)
78. Soybeans and Anovulatory cycle
79. Soy and Wound Healing
80. Soy and Thyroid Hormones
81. Soy bean as medicinal, food and and other uses
82. Soy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
83. Soy and immunomodulatory bioactivity
84. Soy as alternative to hormone replacement therapy
85. Soy and kidney disease
86. Soy protein diet and linoleic acid
87. Soy protein and polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and elevated kidney insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels
88. Soy protein and chronic kidney disease progression
89. Soy and Fibroadenomas
90. Are Soy isoflavones safe?
91. Soy and Peanut allergy
92. Soy and Gene expression
93. Soy and Iron Deficiency Anemia
94. Soy Sauce on Anemia Prevention in Children
95. Differential effects of whole soy extract and soy isoflavones
96. Soy and uterine cancer
97. Soy and Nipple aspirate fluid
98. Soy and Muscle protein synthesis and Muscle protein accretion
99. Soy and Anabolism
100. Soy and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma cells
101. Soy and ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3
102. Soy and Genistein-induced neuronal apoptosis
103. Soy and fibrocystic breast disease
104. Soy and Emulsion after gastrointestinal cancer
105. Soy and risk and benefits of soy products for peri- and postmenopausal women.
106. The role of isoflavones in menopausal health consensus opinion of The North American Menopause Society.
107. Soy isoflavones and cancer cells radiotherapy
108. Soy isoflavones and Colon Cancer
109. Soy isoflavones and Cancer prevention
110. Soy isoflavones and Ovariectomy on the salivary glands
111. Soy Protein and Obesity-related comorbidities
112. Soy and muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion
113. Soy and Growth of pathogenic bacteria
114. Soy protein and Metabolic syndrome
115. Soy Protein and proteinuric glomerulopathies
116. Soy Protein and Kidney Function
117. Soy and Cancer Prevention
118. Soy protein and cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease
119. Soybean and Intestinal bacteria
120. Soy isoflavones and Prevention of Breast Cancer
121. soy and seaweed supplements in healthy postmenopause
122. Soy and self-reported quality of life in post-menopausal women.
123. Soy and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in Prostate Cancer
124. Soy and Cervical cancer
125. Soy and coronary heart disease prevention
126. Soy and Inflammatory disorders
127. Soy, the second generation soy foods
128. Soy and renal cell carcinoma tumors and metastatic disease
129. Soy isoflavone and Sanfilippo Disease
130. Soy and endothelial function and blood pressure
131. Soy lecithin and Maintenance of sperm
132. Soy and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative
133. Soy and Macrophage Phagocytosis and Lymphocyte
134. Soy and Anti-Epigenetic changes
135. Soy and body weight and glycemic control
136. Soy protein versus soy phytoestrogens
137. Soy Protein and Aortic cholesteryl ester content
138. Soy and Mental Stress
139. Soy and Administration on hypercholesterolemia
140. Soy and Vascular Effects
141. Soy isoflavones and lung cancer
142. Soy isoflavones and curcumin and Prostate-specific antigen.
143. Soy isoflavones and Ovarian estrogen receptor-α
144. Soy and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative
145. Soy lecithin and Maintenance of sperm
146. Soy and muscle protein synthesis
147. Soy milk and the Adventist Health
148. Soy protein and body fat
149. Soy and physicochemical properties
150.
Soy and menstrual migraine
151.
Soy and neuropathic pain
152.
Soy and symptoms of Krabbe disease
153.
Soy protein diet increases skilled forelimb reaching function after stroke
154.
Soy and Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS)
155.
Soy and Parkinson's disease
156. Soy isoflavones and Alzheimer's disease
157. Soy isoflavones and Memory performance
158. Soy isoflavone and Cerebral arteries
159. Soy and Neurovascular research
160. Soy isoflavones and Myocardial fibrosis
161. Soy and Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)
162. Soy and Vasomotor symptoms
163. Soy isoflavones and Prostate-specific antigen
164. Soy and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells
165. Soy and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) activities
166. Soy and Metastatic cancer progression
167. Soy and Human hepatoma cells
168. Soy Isoflavone and Lung Cancer
169. Soy isoflavones and the production of prostate-specific antigen
170. Soy isoflavones (Glyceollins ) and adipocyte activity and nutrient metabolism
171. Soybean glyceollins and potential cancer-protective antiestrogenic effects
172. Soy isoflavonoid and endogenous estrogen metabolism
173. Soy protein and hormones in pre- and post-menopausal women
174. Soybean isoflavone and feminizing effects in Men
175. Soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men
176. Isoflavone-rich soy protein and androgen receptor
177. Hormonal effects of soy and premenopausal women and men
178. Isoflavone-free soy diet and ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
179. Soy and Menstrual Migraine
180. Soy and cerebral and myocardial infarctions
181. Soy and Neuroprotective effects
182. Soy and Memory performance
183. Soy and Cerebral vascular disease
185. Soy and Multiple Sclerosis
186. Soy and chronic diseases
187. Soy milk as probiotics
188. Soy milk and Infantile Colic
189. Soy and gender-role play behavior in children
190. Soy protein and Congestive heart failure
191. Soy isoflavones and cardioprotection to offspring
192. Soy and Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)
193. Soy and Angina
194.
Soy isoflavones and exercise to improve physical capacity
195. Soy Lecithin phosphatidic acid and Stress Disorders
196. Soy and Peanut allergy
197. Soy and Longevity, Learning and Memory
198. Soy lecithin administration on hypercholesterolemia
199. Soy lecithin replaces egg yolk for cryopreservation of human sperm
200. Soy protein and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative effects
201.Soybean oil and fatty liver and serum cholesterol
202. Soybean oil on atherogenic metabolic risks associated with estrogen deficiency
203. Soy and Short-term use of parenteral nutrition
204. Stearidonic Acid-Enhanced Soybean Oil
205. Soy and Dietary lipids during early pregnancy
206. Nutrition professionals. and Participants' willingness to consume soy foods
207.  Reported attitudes and beliefs toward soy food consumption
208. Soy protein and its implication in diseases mediated by lipid disorders
209. Patients' perceptions of cholesterol, cardiovascular disease risk, and risk communication strategies
210. Soy and the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases
211. Reported attitudes and beliefs toward soy food consumption
212.Soy protein and its implication in diseases mediated by lipid disorders
213. Soy Isoflavones-Role of intestinal bacteria as the "second human genome"
214. Age-stratified serum levels of isoflavones and proportion of equol
215.Soy isoflavone metabolism and accumulation in prostatic fluid
216. Soy and potential health benefits of phytoestrogens
217. Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle
218. Soy and leukemia
219. Isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
220. Fat, dietary fiber, soy isoflavones, and alcohol with levels of sex hormones and prolactin in premenopausal Japanese women
221. Isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
222. Effects of isoflavones on breast density in pre- and post-menopausal women
223. Factors to consider in the association between soy isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk
224. Effect of dietary soy intake on breast cancer risk
225. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants
226. Soy milk as effective as skim milk
227. A novel soy-based meal replacement formula for weight loss among obese individuals
228. Effect of soy drink replacement in a weight reducing diet
229. Soy isoflavones protect the skin from oxidative stress induced by UVB
230. Soy and estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity 
231. soy isoflavone aglycone improves the aged skin of adult women
232. Soy isoflavones on the skin of postmenopausal women
233. Oxidative in vitro metabolism of the soy phytoestrogens
234. Soybean isoflavones and Chronic health disorders
235. Oxidative metabolism and genotoxic potential of major isoflavone phytoestrogens
236. Daidzein and genistein glucuronides are weakly estrogenic and activate human natural killer cells
237. The Health Benefits Of Tofu Food
238. Inhibition of murine bladder tumorigenesis by soy isoflavones
239. Self-identities and BMI of Minnesotan soy consumers and non-consumers
240. The attitudes and beliefs of soy foods consumers (SCs) versus nonconsumers (NCs)
241. For me the taste of soy is not a barrier to its consumption
242. Infant formulas and soy protein-based formulas
243. Isoflavone content of infant formulas and the metabolic Fate
244. Developmental Status of 1-Year-Old Infants Fed Breast Milk, Cow's Milk Formula, or Soy Formula
245. Probiotics in infants for prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity
246. Early-life soy exposure and age at menarche
247. Full of Beans? Early Soy Exposure Associated with Less Feminine Play in Girls
248. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants
249. Diagnostic approach and management of cow's milk protein allergy in infants and children
250. Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women
251. Effects of an isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
252. Associations of intakes of fat, dietary fiber, soy isoflavones, and alcohol with levels of sex hormones
253. Legume, soy, tofu, and isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women  
254. Tamoxifen, soy, and lifestyle factors in Asian American women with breast cancer
255. Soy isoflavone daidzein and Skin Cancer
256. Soy Estrogen - 5 Easy Ways to Get This Natural Estrogen Replacement
257. Validation of a soy food-frequency questionnaire and evaluation of correlates of plasma isoflavone concentrations
258. Soymilk For Health - Top 10 Benefits!
259. Retinoid-induced epidermal hyperplasia in human skin organ culture: inhibition with soy extract and soy isoflavones
260. Herbal antiinflammatory drugs in the treatment of painful osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain
261. Pharmaceutical and nutraceutical management of canine osteoarthritis
262. Symptomatic efficacy of avocado-soybean unsaponifiables (ASU) in osteoarthritis (OA)
263. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiable mixtures on metalloproteinases, cytokines and prostaglandin E2 production
264. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis
265. Quality, antioxidative ability, and cell proliferation-enhancing activity
266. Enhanced antioxidative activity of soybean koji
267. Soy isoflavones and plasma lipids in normocholesterolemic and mildly hypercholesterolemic
268. Soy protein in the management of hyperlipidemia
269. Equol status and blood lipid profile and Soy products
270. Soy protein and antibiotic release, bacterial inhibition and cellular response
271. Novel soy protein wound dressings with controlled antibiotic release
272. Soy isoflavone equol and Acute colitis
273. Soy isoflavones and exercise to improve physical capacity
274. Weight loss without losing muscle mass
275. Soy and hormonal action and brain plasticity
276. Soy and Neurobehavioral effects
277. Soy isoflavones on estrogen and phytoestrogen metabolism
278. Soy consumption alters endogenous estrogen metabolism
279. Soy and the exercise-induced inflammatory response
280. Antihyperglycemic effect of biochanin A, a soy isoflavone
281. Soy and bone mineral density (BMD) in women aged 30-40
282. Lignans and isoflavones and breast cancer risk
283. Soy and breast density
284. Soy Milk Consumption and serum d-dimer
285. Effect of probiotic-fermented, genetically modified soy milk on hypercholesterolemia
286. Effect of bioactive compounds in lactobacilli-fermented soy skim milk on femoral bone microstructure
287. Neurobehavioral actions of coumestrol and related isoflavonoids
288. Phytoestrogens modulate binding response of estrogen receptors alpha and beta
289. Soy isoflavone genistein and tendon collagen
290. Dietary polyphenols and mechanisms of osteoarthritis
291. Comparison of the effects of cows' milk, fortified soy milk, and calcium supplement on weight and fat loss in premenopausal overweight and obese women.
292. Green tea and dietary soy and Cancers
293. Soy and high calcium and Bone mineral density
294. Isoflavones with supplemental calcium and isoflavones alone. in Bone loss
295. Isoflavone-enriched milk and Bone Mass
296. Soy oil and Steady weight Loss
297. Soy isoflavones and antioxidants and Krabbe disease
298. High polyphenol, low probiotic diet for weight loss
299. Relation between equol and soy foods health effect
300. Gut bacterial metabolism of the soy isoflavone daidzein
301. Metabolism of dietary soy isoflavones to equol by human intestinal microflora
302. Equol status in the effects of isoflavone on bone and fat mass
303. Soy isoflavones, diet and physical exercise modify serum cytokines in healthy obese
304. Soy isoflavones improve insulin sensitivity without changing serum leptin
305. Soy and Energy metabolism
306. High-protein, low-glycemic-load hypocaloric diet in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome
307. Soy protein and Metabolic syndrome (MetS)
308. Does consuming isoflavones reduce or increase breast cancer risk?
309. Isoflavones and cognitive function in older women
310. Soy and red clover for mid-life and aging
311. Soy isoflavone supplementation and body weight and glucose metabolism
312. Soy and mammographic density
313. Soy isoflavones and Breast cancer and puberty timing
314. The optimal soy protein and isoflavone intakes for women
315. Soy nut consumption and decreased menopausal symptoms
316. Botanical and dietary supplements for menopausal symptoms
317. Soy and red clover for mid-life and aging
318. Soy milk and isoflavone supplements on cognitive performance in healthy, postmenopausal women
319. Dietary phytoestrogens, including isoflavones, lignans, and coumestrol, in nonvitamin, nonmineral supplements commonly consumed by women in Canada
320. Intake of dietary phytoestrogens by Dutch women
321. Phytoestrogens in postmenopausal indications
323. Phytoestrogen-containing food and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases
324. Dietary phytoestrogens and hormonally dependent disease
325. Potential risks and benefits of phytoestrogen-rich diets
326. Exposure of isoflavone is correlated with the testosterone
327. The effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men
328. Endogenous and exogenous equol are antiestrogenic in reproductive tissues 
329. Metabolize daidzein to equol
330. Dietary phytoestrogens and intestinal bacteria
331. The use of flavonoids to promote weight loss
332. Estrogenicity of the isoflavone metabolite equol on reproductive and non-reproductive organs 
333. The clinical importance of the metabolite equol
334. Comparisons of infants fed breast milk and milk formula
335. The health consequences of early soy consumption
336. Developmental effects and health aspects of soy protein isolate, casein, and whey
337. High-dose daidzein affects growth and development of reproductive organs 
334. The effects of heat oxidation on protein carbonyl content and α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging activity in soy protein
335.Soy consumption and mortality in Hong Kong
336. Soy foods consumed at levels comparable to those in Asian populations
337. Functional effects of Japanese style fermented soy sauce (shoyu) and its components
338. Fermented and non-fermented soy food consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese and Korean populations
339. Dietary trial in prostate cancer
340. Menopause Diet Tips - Eat Foods Rich in Phytoestrogens
341. Natto and Escalated regeneration in sciatic nerve 
342. Fermented soybeans, natto, improved the neurobehavioral deficits 
343. Topical delivery and potential dermal use of soy isoflavones
344. The role of isoflavones in cancer chemoprevention
345. Genistein and synthetic derivatives of isoflavone in cancer prevention and therapy
346. Phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein and immunity
347. Intralipid prevents and rescues fatal pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular failure
348. Atherosclerosis-preventing activity of lactic acid bacteria-fermented milk-soymilk supplemented
349. Genistein ameliorates hyperglycemia in a mouse model of nongenetic type 2 diabetes
350. Genistein reverses severe pulmonary hypertension and prevents right heart failure
351. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiable (ASU) to treat osteoarthritis: a clarification
352. Flavonoids Genistein and icariin in Bone remodelling
353.  Icariin is more potent than genistein in Osteoblast differentiation and Mineralization
354. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables on joint space loss in osteoarthritis of the hip
355. Regulation of lipid metabolism by soy protein and its implication in diseases mediated by lipid disorders
356. Health Benefits of Soymilk
357. Spill the Beans - Soybeans 
358. Inverse association of soy product intake with serum androgen and estrogen concentrations
359. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants
360. Soy isoflavone food on survival of breast cancer
361. Soy Milk Protein - An Alternative Protein Source
362. A List of Common Soy Foods & Health Benefits
363. Soy Protein Shake and Soy Protein Shakes
364. Organic Soy Milk
365. Risk factors for multiple myeloma
366. Ethanol extract of fermented soybean and the apoptosis of mouse spleen, and thymus cells
367. Estrogenic activity of glycitein, a soy isoflavone
368. Vegetarian Options - Tempeh Vs Tofu
369. Whole versus the piecemeal approach to evaluating soy
370. Brain aging and midlife tofu consumption 
371. Soy protein consumption and bone mass in early postmenopausal Chinese women
372. Human liver microsomes CYP1A2 in the mono-hydroxylation of daidzein
373. Soy food intake and breast cancer survival.
374. Soy and muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion
375. Comparison of the effects of cows' milk, fortified soy milk, and calcium supplement on weight and fat loss
376. Ethanol extract of fermented soybean and the apoptosis of mouse spleen, and thymus cells.
377. Korean fermented soybean paste on melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells
378. Discover the Benefits of Soy Through Soy Weight Loss Shakes
379. Fermented soybean and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cells
380. Antidiabetic effects of fermented soybean products on type 2 diabetes
381. Boost Weight Loss With Adding Soy to Your Diet
382. Protein - Is Soy an Excellent Source of Protein for Health and Weight Loss Programs?
383. Anticancer and antimetastatic properties of doenjang
384. Korean fermented red pepper plus soybean paste, improves glucose homeostasis
385. Nutrition and bone health. Soybean and soy foods, and bone health
386. Tofu Is A Wonder Food
387. Body Fat and Bone Mineral Content of Infants Fed Breast Milk, Cow's Milk Formula, or Soy Formula during the First Year of Life
388. Prenatal and infant exposures and age at menarche
389. Mammary gland morphology and gene expression differ in female rats treated with 17β-estradiol or fed soy protein isolate
390. Hepatic gene expression following consumption of soy protein isolate in female Sprague-Dawley rats 
391. Anticancer and antimetastatic properties of doenjang
392. Isoflavones in urine, saliva, and blood of infants of soy formula
393. Soy and congenital hypothyroidism
394. Nutrition and bone health. Soybean and soy foods, and bone health
395. Isoflavone glycitein 7-O-beta-D-glucoside 4''-O-methylate inhibits EGF-induced mucus hypersecretion in the human lung mucoepidermoid cells.
396. Isoflavonoids inhibit on rat prostate testosterone 5α-reductase
397. Dietary lignans and isoflavonoids Inhibits 5 alpha-reductase in genital skin fibroblasts and prostate tissue
398. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability
399.Potential risks and benefits of phytoestrogen-rich diets
400. Phyto-oestrogens: where are we now?
401. Adequate but not supplemental folic acid combined with soy isoflavones during early life improves bone health at adulthood 
402. Dietary proteins and lipid metabolism.
403. Effects of soy protein and soybean isoflavones on thyroid function in healthy adults and hypothyroid patients
404. Isoflavone supplements and thyroid function in iodine-replete postmenopausal women
405. Skeletal benefits of soy isoflavones
406. Seaweed and soy: companion foods in Asian cuisine and their effects on thyroid function in American women
407. The effects of soy milk and isoflavone supplements on cognitive performance in healthy, postmenopausal women
408. Isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, regulate mucosal immune response by suppressing dendritic cell function
409. Dietary isoflavone intake, urinary isoflavone level, and their relationship with metabolic syndrome diagnostic components
410. Isoflavones on tumor growth and cachexia in newly established cachectic mouse models carrying human stomach cancers
411. Isoflavone supplements and thyroid function in iodine-replete postmenopausal women
412. Associations between urinary soy isoflavonoids and two inflammatory markers 
413. Daidzein sulfoconjugates are potent inhibitors of sterol sulfatase (EC 3.1.6.2)
414. Quercetin and daidzein β-apo-14'-carotenoic acid esters as membrane antioxidants
415. Comparison of flavonoids and isoflavonoids as antioxidants
416.Thermal stability of genistein and daidzein and its effect on their antioxidant activity
418. Daidzein affects steroidogenesis and oestrogen receptor expression in medium ovarian follicles of pigs
419. Dietary lignan intake and postmenopausal breast cancer risk 
420. Dietary intake of soy protein and tofu in association with breast cancer risk
421. Fruits, vegetables, soy foods and breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal Korean women
422. Epidemiology of soy exposures and breast cancer risk
423. Adolescent and adult soy intake and risk of breast cancer in Asian-Americans
424. Tofu and risk of breast cancer in Asian-Americans
425. Discovery of an S-equol rich food stinky tofu
426. Does equol production determine soy endocrine effects
427. Defining equol-producer status and its frequency among vegetarians
428. Sex and long-term soy diets affect the metabolism and excretion of soy isoflavones
429. Brain aging and midlife tofu consumption
430. Isoflavones and cognitive function in older women
431. Effects of soy milk and isoflavone supplements on cognitive performance in healthy, postmenopausal women
432. Soy's phytoestrogens and their implication for human health
433. Vascular action of polyphenols
434. Vascular protection by dietary polyphenols
435. Effect of soy protein containing isoflavones on cognitive function, bone mineral density, and plasma lipids 
436. Isoflavones and cognitive function in older women: the Soy and Postmenopausal Health
437. Effects of soy isoflavone supplementation on cognitive function in Chinese postmenopausal women
438. Phytoestrogens and healthy aging
439. Phytoestrogens and the menopause
440. Phytoestrogen supplements for the treatment of hot flashes
441. Isoflavones from red clover (Promensil) significantly reduce menopausal hot flush symptoms
442. Phytoestrogen-containing food and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases
443. Phytoestrogens and human health effects
444. A review of the clinical effects of phytoestrogens
445. Flax-seed extracts with phytoestrogenic effects on a hormone receptor-positive tumour cell line
446. Phytoestrogens and breast cancer
447. Synaptodendritic recovery following HIV-1 Tat exposure: Neurorestoration by phytoestrogens
448. Phytoestrogens selective for the estrogen receptor beta exert anti-androgenic effects in castration resistant prostate cancer
449. Interaction effects between genes involved in the AKT signaling pathway and phytoestrogens in gastric carcinogenesis
450. Phytoestrogens for vasomotor menopausal symptoms
451. Soy's phytoestrogens and their implication for human health
452. Dietary lignan intake and postmenopausal breast cancer risk by estrogen and progesterone receptor status
453. Novel Insights into the Pharmacology of Flavonoids
451. A new perspective on the quercetin paradox in male reproductive dysfunction
452. Health effects of quercetin: from antioxidant to nutraceutical
453. Fruits and vegetables in the prevention of cellular oxidative damage
454. Assessment of phytochemicals, antioxidant, anti-lipid peroxidation and anti-hemolytic activity of extract and various fractions of Maytenus royleanus leaves
455. Antioxidant activity, total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of whole plant extracts Torilis leptophylla L.
456. Neurobehavioral actions of coumestrol and related isoflavonoids in rodents
457. Dietary phytoestrogen improves relaxant responses to 17-β-estradiol in aged but not ovariectomised rat bladders
458. The pros and cons of phytoestrogens
459. Phytoestrogen action in the adult and developing brain
460. Phytoestrogen-containing food and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases
461. Phytoestrogen tissue levels in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer and their association with prostatic diseases
462. Dietary phytoestrogens in the prevention of long-term postmenopausal diseases
463. A review of the evidence for the use of phytoestrogens as a replacement for traditional estrogen replacement therapy
464. Dietary phytoestrogens and their role in hormonally dependent disease
465.Estrogenic activity of natural and synthetic estrogens in human breast cancer cells in culture
466. Estrogen and progestin bioactivity of foods, herbs, and spices
467. Phytoestrogen content in foods
469. Phytoestrogen content of foods consumed in Canada, including isoflavones, lignans, and coumestan
470. Breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk in relation to phytoestrogen intake
471. Dietary phytoestrogen intake--lignans and isoflavones--and breast cancer risk (Canada)
472. Dietary phytoestrogen intake and premenopausal breast cancer risk  
473. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer
474.Flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and breast cancer risk
475. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of cancer in postmenopausal women
476. Intake of flavonoids and risk of cancer in Finnish men
477. The intake of flavonoids and carotid atherosclerosis 

 
 






Side effects
1. Raw soybean is Toxic
2. Soy can increase the risk of bladder cancer
3. Soy Allergic effects
4. Soy and Menstrual Cramps and Pain (Negative effects) (I have a funny feeling about this study)
5. Soy and In Pregnancy

For other women's Health articles visit http://womenconditions-breasthealth.blogspot.com/
or http://allaboutwomanshealth.blogspot.com/