Get Pregnant Naturally

Get Pregnant Naturally
".....Utilizing Traditional Chinese Medicine in Tonifying Energy flow to the Reproductive System Channels In Men and Women for Natural Conception, including Couple Who were diagnosed with Unexplained causes of Infertility...." Chantel M.

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Thursday, September 29, 2011

Soy and Wound Healing.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of"Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing" by Park E, Lee SM, Jung IK, Lim Y, Kim JH., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers suggested that genistein supplementation reduces oxidative stress by increasing antioxidant capacity and modulating proinflammatory cytokine expression during the early stage of wound healing.

Soy and Angiogenesis

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Phytoestrogens and inhibition of angiogenesis" by Fotsis T, Pepper MS, Montesano R, Aktas E, Breit S, Schweigerer L, Rasku S, Wähälä K, Adlercreutz H.,
posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that The wide distribution of isoflavonoids and flavonoids in the plant kingdom, together with their anti-angiogenic and anti-mitotic properties, suggest that these phytoestrogens may contribute to the preventive effect of a plant-based diet on chronic diseases, including solid tumours.

Soybeans and Anovulatory cycle.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the study of "The effect of soybeans on the anovulatory cycle" by Kohama T, Kobayashi H, Inoue M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that we estimated the ovular improvement of theses patients, observing basal body temperature (BBT) and follicular development with ultrasonography during the menstrual cycle as the indexes for ovulation and compared them with 34 patients with no treatment (C group). In the S group, improved ovulation was seen in 12 patients, four patients became pregnant, and three patients had anovular menstruation within 3 months after starting to take soybean powder. The periods of first ovulation were 66 +/- 12 days. After ovulation started, all subjects had regular menstruations and ovulation, with more than a 7-day high phase in BBT. On the other hand, in the C group, improved ovulation was seen in two patients, and two patients had anovular menstruation and found that black soybean has the potential to improve the anovular menstrual cycle.

Soy and Clomiphene Citrate (Artificial Insemination)

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "High dose of phytoestrogens can reverse the antiestrogenic effects of clomiphene citrate on the endometrium in patients undergoing intrauterine insemination: a randomized trial" by Unfer V, Casini ML, Costabile L, Mignosa M, Gerli S, Di Renzo GC. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Both treatments increased follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and 17beta-estradiol plasma concentrations, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, the differences in endometrial thickness of the two groups were statistically significant. No significant differences in the pulsatility index values and in the number of preovulatory follicles were noted, and concluded that a high dose of phytoestrogens can reverse the deleterious effects of clomiphene citrate on endometrial thickness and could contribute to higher pregnancy rates.

Soy and Reproductive Organs in Infants

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

Although it is a very controversial subject, according to the study of "Ultrasonographic patterns of reproductive organs in infants fed soy formula: comparisons to infants fed breast milk and milk formula" by Gilchrist JM, Moore MB, Andres A, Estroff JA, Badger TM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers filed the result that There were no significant feeding group effects in anthropometric or body composition. Among girls, there were no feeding group differences in breast bud or uterine volume. MF infants had greater (P < .05) mean ovarian volume and greater (P < .01) numbers of ovarian cysts per ovary than did BF infants. Among boys, there were no feeding group differences in prostate or breast bud volumes. Mean testicular volume did not differ between SF and MF boys, but both formula-fed groups had lower volumes than BF infants, and concluded that Our data do not support major diet-related differences in reproductive organ size as measured by ultrasound in infants at age 4 months, although there is some evidence that ovarian development may be advanced in MF-fed infants and that testicular development may be slower in both MF and SF infants as compared with BF. There was no evidence that feeding SF exerts any estrogenic effects on reproductive organs studied.

Layered Tofu Salad & Warm Soy Sauce Dressing Recipe

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe by Soyconnection.com

Ingredients:


Layered Tofu Salad
2 Large heads iceberg lettuce, shredded
3 Medium red onions, thinly sliced
3 quarts Bean sprouts
9 Medium tomatoes, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
3 pounds Silken tofu, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
1 1/2 pounds Canned red salmon or light tuna
3 cups Watercress (3 oz.), cut into 1-inch pieces (optional)
Warm Soy Sauce Dressing
1 cup Soy sauce



1 1/2 cups Soybean oil (vegetable oil)
1 1/2 cups Green onions, minced
9 Cloves garlic, mashed
1 1/2 teaspoons Sugar
3/4 teaspoon Bottled hot pepper sauce
Instructions for Layered Tofu Salad & Warm Soy Sauce Dressing:

For buffets, layer salad ingredients in order of listing in a large shallow bowl or serving platter. Just before serving, heat ingredients for Warm Soy Sauce Dressing. Toss salad and serve.

For a sit-down meal, toss salad and serve about 2 cups per serving. Garnish with choice of cherry tomatoes, sliced red onions, sweet red or yellow peppers, sugar pea pods or sliced cucumbers.



Nutrition Per Serving:

2 cup serving: 395.2 calories, 29.2 gm protein, 26.6 gm carbohydrates, 21.1 gm fat, 24.9 mg cholesterol, 1.0 gm saturated fat, 1787 mg sodium, 6.2 gm dietary fiber. (Source)

Soy and Climacteric Symptoms

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Climacteric symptoms among Japanese women and men: comparison of four symptom checklists" by Melby MK., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researcher filed the result in abstract that 32 women and 22 men (mean age 48.7 years) provided complete questionnaires. Although males had higher prevalence of stress, irritability, and nervousness (p < 0.05), no men reported having kōnenki. Four of eight female symptom factors exhibited significant correlations with kōnenki status. All symptom index scores were lower in pre-kōnenki women than in peri-kōnenki women, but scores for men and women did not differ. Soy intake and Lock score were negatively correlated among women.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Four Bean Salad

Posted by Chantel M. recipe Contributed by Soyforlife (Source)


Combine these ingredients in a large bowl:
1 cup 250 mL Green beans
1 cup 250 mL Wax beans
1 cup 250 mL kidney beans
1 cup 250 mL Soybeans
1/2 cup 125 mL Diced celery
1/2 cup 125 mL Sliced onion

In a small saucepan, mix together:
1/4 cup 60 mL Soy oil
1/3 cup 75 mL Sugar
1/4 cup 60 mL Vinegar
1/2 tsp 2 mL Basil
2 tbsp 30 mL Parsley
A colourful make ahead picnic salad, this
recipe can be made with cooked or canned
beans. Remember to save the marinade to
store any leftover salad.
Boil the sauce, then pour over bean mixture.
Mix thoroughly. Refrigerate 24 hours before
serving. Drain salad before serving. Save
marinade to store any leftover salad.

Servings: 12

Nutritional Values Per Serving:
Calories 117
Protein 4 g
Carbohydrates 13 g
Fat 6 g

Monday, September 26, 2011

Soy and Neurobehavioural Actions

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In an abstract of the study of "Phytoestrogen action in the adult and developing brain" by Patisaul HB., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that their neurobehavioural actions are largely anti-oestrogenic, either antagonising or producing an action in opposition to that of oestradiol. Small, physiologically relevant exposure levels can alter oestrogen-dependent gene expression in the brain and affect complex behaviour in a wide range of species. The implications for these findings in humans, and particularly in infants, largely remain uninvestigated but are a subject of increasing public interest.

Soy and equol and O-desmethylangolensin.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "[Research development on relation between equol and soy foods health effect].[Article in Chinese], by Liu B, Qin L, Wang P., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Under the function of human intestinal bacteria, soybean can produce equol and O-desmethylangolensin. Among humans, 30%-55% have the bacteria capable of producing equol. Factors that influence the capacity to produce equol are not clearly established; however, gut physiology, host genetics, and diet factors are probably related to the individual difference of equol producing.

Soy and Bone Cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Analgesic effects of a soy-containing diet in three murine bone cancer pain models" by Zhao C, Wacnik PW, Tall JM, Johns DC, Wilcox GL, Meyer RA, Raja SN., Posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated in abstract that
the soy diet had no effect on cancer growth. Morphine dose-dependently reduced hyperalgesia with no diet-based difference. These results suggest that a soy diet might provide analgesia in certain forms of hyperalgesia associated with bone cancer. PERSPECTIVE: The study raises the possibility of dietary supplements influencing aspects of cancer pain. Further research will help determine if use of nutritional supplements, such as soy proteins, can reduce opioid analgesic use in chronic pain states and help minimize the side effects associated with long term use of opioids.

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Soy and Urinary Incontinence

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Dietary phytoestrogens maintain contractile responses to carbachol with age in the female rat isolated bladder" by Owen SJ, Rose'Meyer RB, Massa HM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that The contractile response to carbachol, in 12 week old female rats did not change as a result of dietary phytoestrogens or ovariectomy (P>0.05). At 24 weeks of age, detrusor muscle strip responses to carbachol from non-soy fed ovariectomised rats were attenuated (P<0.05). At 52 weeks, bladder detrusor strip responses to carbachol were reduced in all treatment groups with the exception of the soy-fed sham operated rats and concluded that These results suggest an age-related reduction in the contractile response of the detrusor to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol, which may be prevented by long term dietary phytoestrogen intake.

Soy and Baldness

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Anti-alopecia mechanisms of soymetide-4, an immunostimulating peptide derived from soy beta-conglycinin" by Tsuruki T, Takahata K, Yoshikawa M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researcher indicated that Soymetide-4 has weak affinity for N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) receptor. fMLP showed an anti-alopecia effect after intraperitoneal administration, though it was inactive after oral administration, ......PGE2 is produced after activation of COX by soymetide-4, might suppress apoptosis of hair matrix cells and etoposide-induced alopecia by activating NF-kappaB.

Soy and Bad Breath

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of " Organic solvents and oils as vehicles for triclosan in mouthrinses: a clinical study" by Kjaerheim V, Waaler SM, Rölla G., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Three different oils were tested: olive oil, soy oil, and sunflower seed oil, as well as PEG and GLY. Triclosan was used in a 0.3% concentration to facilitate comparison with previous studies. However, only 0.15% triclosan was added to the GLY-containing rinse (maximum soluble concentration). In addition, soy oil without triclosan was tried. The mean plaque score for water was 1.42 +/- 0.19; for olive oil, 1.08 +/- 0.34; for soy oil with triclosan, 0.95 +/- 0.35; for pure soy oil, 0.94 +/- 0.09; for sunflower seed oil, 1.19 +/- 0.19; for PEG, 1.04 +/- 0.22; and for GLY, 1.12 +/- 0.28, and filed the conclusion in which oils in themselves exhibit significant plaque inhibition. In vitro tests showed no antibacterial activity of triclosan dissolved in oils. Toothpastes and mouthrinses contain flavoring oils and occasionally also GLY and PEG. Such substances may well interfere with the clinical effect of triclosan in these products.

Soy and Back Pain

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Protocol for the Cognitive Interventions and Nutritional Supplements (CINS) trial: a randomized controlled multicenter trial of a brief intervention (BI) versus a BI plus cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) versus nutritional supplements for patients with long-lasting muscle and back pain" by Reme SE, Tveito TH, Chalder T, Bjørkkjaer T, Indahl A, Brox JI, Fors E, Hagen EM, Eriksen HR, posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Healh, researchers indicated that The nutritional supplements consist of a dosage of 10 grams of either soy or seal oil (capsules) per day for 3 months, administered in a double blind design. All patients will be followed up with questionnaires after 3, 6 and 12 months, while sick leave data will be collected up to at least 24 months after randomization. The primary outcome of the study is sick leave and will be based on register data from the National Insurance Administration. Secondary outcomes include self-reported data on disability, pain, and psychological variables.
I hope for the positive result from the study

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Coconut Curried Tofu with Green Jasmine Rice

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by Rita Added February 12, 2003 | Recipe #53880, by Food.com

Total Time: 40 mins

Prep Time: 20 mins

Cook Time: 20 mins

Rita~'s Note: This is a vegetarian dish from Bon Appetit January 2003


Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut
  • 1 3/4 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup jasmine rice or 1 cup basmati rice
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro (packed)
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened light coconut milk
  • 4 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 16 ounces extra firm tofu, drained,patted dry,cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/8 teaspoon dry crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup whole small cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped peanuts

Directions:

  1. Stir shredded coconut in small nonstick skillet over medium heat until light golden, about 5 minutes.
  2. Transfer to bowl.
  3. Bring 1 3/4 cups water and salt to boil in heavy medium saucepan.
  4. Stir in rice; bring to boil.
  5. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until water is absorbed and rice is tender, about 18 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, puree cilantro, 1/2 cup coconut milk, 1 teaspoon ginger, lime juice, and half of garlic in blender.
  7. Mix puree and coconut into rice.
  8. Set aside.
  9. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat.
  10. Add tofu; stir-fry until golden, about 6 minutes.
  11. Add onions, curry, cumin, red pepper, remaining ginger, and remaining garlic.
  12. Stir-fry 1 minute.
  13. Stir in tomatoes and remaining coconut milk.
  14. Season with salt and pepper.
  15. Divide rice among 4 plates.
  16. Top with tofu mixture.
  17. Sprinkle with peanuts.
  18. Availableat specialty foods stores and natural foods stores.
  19. Availableat Asian markets and in the Asian foods section of many supermarkets.

Soy and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the abstract of the study of "Protective effect of soy protein on collagen-induced arthritis in rat" by Mohammad Shahi M, Rashidi MR, Mahboob S, Haidari F, Rashidi B, Hanaee J., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Soy protein appeared to be a potent immunomodulatory inhibitor of collagen II-induced arthritis in rats. It could delay onset of RA and reduced cartilage erosion and synovitis inflammation. Therefore, it may be a useful protein in the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patient.

Soy and Alzheimer's disease and Aging

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Soy isoflavones attenuate oxidative stress and improve parameters related to aging and Alzheimer's disease in C57BL/6J mice treated with D-galactose" by Hsieh HM, Wu WM, Hu ML., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers concluded that The DG treatment group and the NA group had similar changes in most of the parameters measured. Overall, this DG-mimetic aging study shows that SIF effectively attenuate oxidative damage and improve parameters related to aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Soy and Asthma

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the abstract of the study of "Dietary intake of soy genistein is associated with lung function in patients with asthma" Smith LJ, Holbrook JT, Wise R, Blumenthal M, Dozor AJ, Mastronarde J, Williams L; American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers, posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that we could not account for these results based on differences in demographics, body mass index, or consumption of other nutrients. Thus, increasing consumption of genistein is associated with better lung function in patients with asthma. Further studies are needed to determine whether dietary supplementation with genistein can reduce asthma severity.

Friday, September 23, 2011

Sundried Tomato Dip

Posted by Chantel M., Recipe contributed Soy for Life

Ingredients
1/4 cup 65 ml Fat Free So Good Fortified
Soy Beverage
1/2 cup 125 ml light cream cheese, at
room temperature
10 Sundried tomatoes,
packed in oil, diced
1 Clove garlic
1-1/2 tbsp 23 ml Finely diced chives
1/4 tsp 2 ml Freshly ground pepper

Most dips are a combination of cream cheese and either sour cream or mayo. This recipe combines Fat Free So Good with light cream cheese to give you a nice light dip. Make it the night before to make sure all the flavours get a chance to develop.

Make sure that the cream cheese is at room temperature. Beat it until smooth. Slowly add the Fat Free So Good. Beat until smooth. remove the tomatoes from the oil and let them sit on a paper towel until most of the oil has been absorbed. Dice the tomatoes. Add to the So Good/cream cheese mixture. Mince the chives and the garlic. Add to the So Good/ cream cheese mixture. Add the pepper and stir well. Cover and put into the fridge overnight. At serving time, give it a mix, and serve with fresh veggies.

Makes 1 and 1/4 cups.

(Source)

Soy and Protection of fluid losses in Escherichia coli

Posted by Chantel M., Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of "A high molecular weight soluble fraction of tempeh protects against fluid losses in Escherichia coli-infected piglet small intestine" by Kiers JL, Nout MJ, Rombouts FM, Nabuurs MJ, van der Meulen J. (Source from Laboratory of Food Microbiology, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group of Wageningen UR, PO Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands. Br J Nutr. 2007 Aug;98(2):320-5. Epub 2007 Apr 26.), posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that that a high molecular weight soluble fraction of tempeh is able to protect against fluid losses induced by ETEC, suggesting that this could play a potential role in controlling ETEC-induced diarrhoea.

Soy and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli

Posted by Chantel M., Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of "Effect of processed and fermented soyabeans on net absorption in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-infected piglet small intestine" by Kiers JL, Nout MJ, Rombouts FM, van Andel EE, Nabuurs MJ, van der Meulen J. (Source from Agrotechnology and Food Science Group of Wageningen UR, Laboratory of Food Microbiology, The Netherlands.Br J Nutr. 2006 Jun;95(6):1193-8.), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Tempeh resulted in a high uptake of solutes. Processed soyabean products, particularly cooked soyabean and tempeh, are beneficial in maintaining fluid balance during ETEC infection. Additionally, tempeh showed high DM and total solute absorption. Therefore, particularly, tempeh may be beneficial in the case of post-weaning diarrhoea in piglets and possibly in children as well.

Soy and Muscle Support

Posted by Chantel M., Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of "The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion in young and elderly persons" by Phillips SM, Tang JE, Moore DR. (Source from Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, CANADA. phillis@mcmaster.ca, J Am Coll Nutr. 2009 Aug;28(4):343-54), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, the data indicated that New data suggest that whey protein is better able to support MPS than is soy protein, a finding that may explain the greater ability of whey protein to support greater net muscle mass gains with resistance exercise. This review focuses on evidence showing the differences in responses of MPS, and ultimately muscle protein accretion, to consumption of milk- and soy-based supplemental protein sources in humans.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Soy and Alcoholic Liver Disease

Posted by Chantel M., Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of "Effects of soy protein on alcoholic liver disease in rats undergoing ethanol withdrawal" by Yang HY, Lin HS, Chao JC, Chien YW, Peng HC, Chen JR. (Source from Department of Medical Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan; School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan, J Nutr Biochem. 2011 Aug 1. [Epub ahead of print],Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved) posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that These results suggest that soy protein may improve alcohol-induced lipid accumulation, oxidative stress and inflammation by decreasing proinflammatory cytokines and CYP2E1 protein expression and by increasing PPARα and CYP4A protein expressions and fecal lipid excretion, thereby producing beneficial effects on ALD during ethanol withdrawal.

Soy and Lifestyle-Related Diseases.

Posted by Chantel M. Study Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of "Soy and the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases" bu Zhou JR. (Source from Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. jrzhou@bidmc.harvard.edu, Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Dec;31 Suppl 2:S14-9), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researcher indicated that
1. Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of soy foods is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease, and breast and prostate cancers.
2. Clinical intervention studies indicate that some soy components, especially soy isoflavone-containing soy protein isolate, reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol.
3. Animal studies generally support the conclusion that some soy components prevent the development and progression of breast and prostate cancers.
4. Epidemiological investigations and intervention studies suggest that some soy products are effective for the relief of menopausal symptoms.

Soy Ginger Salmon

Posted by Chantal M. Original recipe by onassis75 posted allrecipes.com



Original Recipe Yield
4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 pound salmon fillets
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar, divided
  • 2 teaspoons lemon pepper, divided
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder, divided
  • 1/3 cup low sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 (1 inch) piece fresh ginger root, minced
  • 1/3 cup orange juice

Directions

  1. Rub salmon with about 1 tablespoon brown sugar. Lightly sprinkle with lemon pepper and garlic powder; rub seasoning into fish.
  2. Into a small saucepan set over medium heat, pour soy sauce and olive oil. Stir in ginger and remaining brown sugar, lemon pepper, and garlic powder. Bring to a gentle simmer, stirring constantly until sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat, stir in orange juice.
  3. Place fish and marinade into a resealable plastic bag, seal, and refrigerate overnight, or for at least 3 hours.
  4. Preheat broiler. Place fish in a foil-lined baking pan. Reserve marinade.
  5. Broil fish skin-side up, 2 minutes. Remove from oven, pull skin off with tongs. Baste with marinade, return to oven, and broil 2 minutes more. Turn fish, and broil until fish flakes easily, about 4 minutes. Remove from oven, and let sit 5 minutes before serving.
(Source)

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Soy helps to reverse age- and scopolamine-induced memory

in a study of "Soybean supplementation helps reverse age- and scopolamine-induced memory deficits in mice" by Bansal N, Parle M. (Source: Pharmacology Division, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, India. nitindsp@rediffmail.com, J Med Food. 2010 Dec;13(6):1293-300. Epub 2010 Oct 18(, posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that soybean administration also resulted in diminished brain AChE activity, decrease in brain TBARS, and increase in GSH levels, thereby indicating facilitated cholinergic transmission, reduced free radical generation, and enhanced scavenging of free radicals. Thus, soybean appears to be a useful remedy for improving memory and for the management of cognitive deficits owing to its pro-estrogenic, antioxidant, procholinergic, and/or neuroprotective properties.

Soy and Anti-Wrinkle

Posted by Chantel M., Contributed by PubMed

In a study of "Effects of isoflavones on the skin of postmenopausal women: a pilot study" by Accorsi-Neto A, Haidar M, Simões R, Simões M, Soares-Jr J, Baracat E. (Source: Gynecology Department, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2009;64(6):505-10.), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Isoflavone treatment resulted in a 9.46% increase in the thickness of the epidermis in 23 patients. In addition, the papillary index was reduced in 21 women. The papillary index was inversely proportional to skin wrinkling, i.e., there were a large number of papillae after treatment. The amount of collagen in the dermis was increased in 25 women (86.2%). In 22 women (75.8%) we observed that the number of elastic fibers increased. The number of dermal blood vessels was significantly increased in 21 women and concluded that the use of a concentrated, isoflavone-rich soy extract during six consecutive months caused significant increases in epithelial thickness, the number of elastic and collagen fibers, as well as the blood vessels.

Soy and C-reactive Protein in post-menopausal women

Posted by Chantel M, Contributed by PubMed

In a study of " Does genotype and equol-production status affect response to isoflavones? Data from a pan-European study on the effects of isoflavones on cardiovascular risk markers in post-menopausal women" by Vafeiadou K, Hall WL, Williams CM. (Source: Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, School of Food Biosciences, Whiteknights, University of Reading, UK. a.vafeiadou@reading.ac.uk, Proc Nutr Soc. 2006 Feb;65(1):106-15), posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that there are no differences in response to isoflavones according to equol-production status. However, differences in HDL-cholesterol and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 response to isoflavones v. placebo are evident with specific ERbeta genotypes. In conclusion, isoflavones have beneficial effects on C-reactive protein, but not other cardiovascular risk markers. However, specific ERbeta gene polymorphic subgroups may benefit from isoflavone supplementation.

Soy and Endometriosis

Posted by Chantel M., Contributed by PubMed


In a study of " Effect of soy isoflavones on endometriosis: interaction with estrogen receptor 2 gene polymorphism" by Tsuchiya M, Miura T, Hanaoka T, Iwasaki M, Sasaki H, Tanaka T, Nakao H, Katoh T, Ikenoue T, Kabuto M, Tsugane S. (Source: Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. Epidemiology. 2007 May;18(3):402-8), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, of a total of 138 women age 20-45 years old who had consulted a university hospital for infertility in Tokyo, Japan in 1999 or 2000, researchers found that dietary isoflavones may reduce the risk of endometriosis among Japanese women, by measuring the urinary levels of genistein and daidzein as markers for dietary intake of soy isoflavones, and genotyped ESR2 gene RsaI polymorphisms.

Beef Salad with Ginger Soy Dressing Recipe

Posted by Chwntel M., Recipe contribution Soyconnection.com


Ingredients:


Ginger Soy Dressing


1/2 cup Soybean oil (often labeled "vegetable oil")
1/4 cup Rice vinegar
1/4 cup Water
2 tablespoons Reduced sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup Fresh green onion, chopped
1 1/2 teaspoon Fresh ginger, minced
1 teaspoon

Fresh garlic, minced

Beef Salad


8 cups Baby salad greens
1 cup Shredded carrots
1 cup Frozen edamame (shelled), cooked according to package directions
1 cup Cherry tomatoes, halved
1 pound Flat iron or flank steak, grilled and sliced
1/2 cup Ginger Soy Dressing (recipe above), divided
Description:
Fill your plate with colorful veggies and greens, topped with lean sliced beef. Add a gingery soy dressing and this delicious salad will become a family favorite.

Prep time:20 minutes
Instructions for Beef Salad with Ginger Soy Dressing:

To Prepare Ginger Soy Dressing:

Place all Ginger Soy Dressing ingredients in food processor or blender. Process until smooth; cover and refrigerate.



Nutrition Per Serving:

420 Calories, 37g Protein, 13g Carbohydrate, 5g Fiber, 24g Fat, 5g Sat. Fat, 0g Trans Fat, 55mg Cholesterol, 290mg Sodium

(Source)

Friday, September 16, 2011

Chinese Barbecued Tofu with Sesame Noodles (Foodservice) Recipe

Posted by Chantel M. recipe contribution by Soyconnection.com

Ingredients:


Marinade
3/4 cup Soy sauce, regular or lite
3/4 cup Hoisin sauce
6 tablespoons Oyster sauce
6 tablespoons Sherry wine or beer
3 tablespoons Brown sugar, firmly packed
9 Cloves Garlic, crushed
1 1/2 teaspoons Five spice seasoning
11 pounds Tofu, firm or extra firm



Sesame Noodles
As needed Water
1 1/8 cups Soy sauce, regular or lite
6 tablespoons Sesame oil
2 tablespoons Granulated sugar
1 1/2 pounds Carrots, bias cut
18 Green onion tops, chopped
8 Cucumbers, peeled and seeded
Instructions for Chinese Barbecued Tofu with Sesame Noodles (Foodservice):
Combine soy sauce, hoi sin sauce, oyster sauce, sherry or beer, brown sugar, garlic and five spice for marinade. Set aside.

Slice each 10-ounce brick of tofu into eight ½ -inch portions. Dry thoroughly between several layers of paper towels. Heat a non-stick skillet and brown tofu on both sides using a small amount of oil. Remove from skillet. Cool slightly. Cover with Chinese Barbecue Sauce and marinate 30 minutes to 2 hours.

Charbroil tofu over hot coals until browned on both sides. Baste tofu several times.

Cook egg noodles in simmering water 2 to 4 minutes or to al dente state. Drain and cold shock to stop cooking. Drain well. Season with soy sauce, sugar and sesame oil. Toss with assorted vegetables.

Serve noodles at room temperature with barbecued tofu. Garnish with onion brushes, carrot curls and cucumber fans, if desired.

*Garnishes: green onion brushes, carrot curls, Cucumber fans (as needed) (Source)






Soy and Neurobehavioral Effects

Posted by Chantel M, Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of " Neurobehavioral effects of dietary soy phytoestrogens." by Lephart ED, West TW, Weber KS, Rhees RW, Setchell KD, Adlercreutz H, Lund TD. (Source from Neuroscience Center, 633 WIDB, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 86402, USA. edwin_lephart@byu.edu), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that consumption of dietary phytoestrogens resulting in very high plasma isoflavone levels (in many cases over a relatively short interval of consumption in adulthood) can significantly alter sexually dimorphic brain regions, anxiety, learning and memory. The findings of these studies identify the biological actions of phytoestrogens, specifically isoflavones and their metabolites, found in animal soy-containing diets on brain and behavior and implicate the importance of phytoestrogens given the recognized significance of estrogens in brain and neural disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, especially in women.

Soy and Depression

Posted by Chantel M, Contributed by PubMed

According to the study of " Neuromodulation by soy diets or equol: anti-depressive & anti-obesity-like influences, age- & hormone-dependent effects." by Blake C, Fabick KM, Setchell KD, Lund TD, Lephart ED. (Source from Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology and The Neuroscience Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602, USA.), posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Consumption of dietary isoflavones or equol exposure in rats has body weight controlling effects and equol specifically may have antidepressant potential dependent upon diet initiation and/or dosage of treatments. The current study demonstrates that equol is able to decrease body weight, abdominal WAT, and depressive-related behavior. While other factors and mechanisms may play a role, in part, the present results provide a greater understanding of how isoflavonoid molecules modulate the brain's influence on behavior.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Soy and Ginger Glazed Salmon Recipe

Posted by Chantel M. Original recipe from John Mitzewich, former About.com Guide


Makes 4 Portions of Soy and Ginger Glazed Salmon Recipe

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp minced, or finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1 clove crushed garlic
  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 4 (six-ounce) center-cut salmon fillets, boneless, skinless
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil

Preparation:

Add the ginger, garlic, rice vinegar, brown sugar, and soy sauce into a small bowl, and mix to combine. Pour the mixture into a shallow dish, large enough to fit the salmon filets. Place the salmon filets into the dish flat side up (what was the skin side) and the rounded side down. Let soak for 10 minutes.

Add the vegetable oil to a non-stick skillet, and preheat on medium flame. When hot, remove the salmon from the marinade (reserve marinade), pat dry with a paper towel, and cook the salmon for about 4 minutes per side. Turn off the heat and pour the marinade into the pan. It will bubble in the hot pan and quickly become a glaze you can spoon over the salmon. Transfer the glazed salmon to a plate and serve hot.
(Source)

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Soy and Osteopenia

Posted by Chantel M., Study Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

In the study of `Effect of bioactive compounds in lactobacilli-fermented soy skim milk on femoral bone microstructure of aging mice.`by Chiang SS, Liao JW, Pan TM. (Source from Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan; Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan.), posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that The trabecular bone volumes in mice fed NTU 101F and NTU 102F increased by a factor of 3.48 and 2.16 compared with control values, respectively. The network density and thickness of distal metaphyseal trabecular bone in mice fed with NTU 101F and NTU 102F milks were significantly denser than that of control mice; moreover, the NTU 101F group had the largest resting area ratio and smallest resorbing area compared with other groups. The beneficial effect may due to isoflavones as well as higher amounts of polysaccharide and peptide in NTU 101F milk and concluded that The results suggest that dietary supplement with fermented soy skim milk can attenuate aging-induced bone loss in BALB/c mice and possibly lower the risk of osteopenia or osteoporosis in aging. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

Soy and Bacterial Infection.

Posted by Chantel M. Contribution by Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

In the study of " Novel soy protein wound dressings with controlled antibiotic release: Mechanical and physical properties." by Peles Z, Zilberman M. (Source from Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.), posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that
Appropriate selection of the process parameters yielded SPI wound dressings with the desired mechanical and physical properties and drug release behavior to protect against bacterial infection. These unique structures are thus potentially useful as burn and ulcer dressings.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Soy Breakfast Sandwich

Posted by Chantel M. contributed by Soy Recipe from Revival

1 biscuit
1 soy breakfast sausage-style pattie
1 (1 oz.) slice soy cheddar cheese

Heat breakfast pattie in microwave. Slice biscuit and place cheese and breakfast pattie between biscuit.

Yield: 1 sandwich. Serving size: 1 sandwich. Per serving: 200 calories, 9 g fat (2 g sat fat), 14 g protein (8 g soy protein), 15 g carbohydrate, 678 mg sodium, 1.8 mg cholesterol, 2.5 g dietary fiber.

(Source)

Soy and Garlic Marinated Chicken


Posted by Chantel M. contributed by Allrecipes.com Canada

By: CANDIELIPS "This is the easiest marinade I have ever used, and one of the most popular with my family. This recipe also works well with any cut of chicken--thighs, legs, etc.
Original Recipe Yield 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts

Directions

  1. In a large, nonporous bowl, combine the garlic and the soy sauce. Add the chicken and turn to coat well. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for at least an hour.
  2. Preheat an outdoor grill for medium high heat and lightly oil the grate.
  3. Grill chicken over medium high heat for 10 to 15 minutes per side, or until internal temperature reaches 180 degrees F (80 degrees C). Discard any remaining marinade.

Nutritional Information
Soy and Garlic Marinated Chicken

Servings Per Recipe: 4

Amount Per Serving

Calories: 152

  • Total Fat: 2.8g
  • Cholesterol: 67mg
  • Sodium: 1863mg
  • Total Carbs: 3.4g
  • Dietary Fiber: 0.3g
  • Protein: 26.7g

(Source)



Sunday, September 11, 2011

Soy and Uric Acid (hyperuricemia and gout)

posted by Chantel M. Source from Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University and Nutrition Matters, Inc 439 Calhoun Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368, United States. markjohnmessina@gmail.com.

In a study of " Soyfoods, hyperuricemia and gout: A review of the epidemiologic and clinical data." by Messina M, Messina VL, Chan P. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Among the healthcare professionals who responded to the survey, 95% considered soyfoods to be somewhat or very healthy and nutritious. In contrast, 48% expressed the view that soyfoods are likely to cause gout. However, none of the six epidemiologic studies identified provided any evidence that soy intake was associated with circulating uric acid levels, hyperuricemia or gout. Data from the five human intervention studies evaluated indicate soy protein does elevate serum uric levels, but in response to amounts comparable to Asian intake, the expected rise would almost certainly be clinically irrelevant. Although there is a need for long-term research, on the basis of the existing data there is no reason for individuals with gout or at risk of developing gout to avoid soyfoods.

Soy and Blood Pressure in Obesity

Posted by Chantel M. Source from Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. azadbakht@hlth.mui.ac.ir.

In a study of " Effect of soy drink replacement in a weight reducing diet on anthropometric values and blood pressure among overweight and obese female youths." by Azadbakht L, Nurbakhsh S.
posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that
The mean age of the patients was 22±2 years. Mean of BMI was 28.1±0.5. Weight and waist circumference did not changed significantly after the soy drink period compared to the cow's milk period. Systolic blood pressure reduced significantly following the soy drink period (mean percent change in soy drink period: -4.0±0.9 vs -1.7±0.5 in the cow's milk period; p<0.05). Diastolic blood pressure also reduced in the soy drink period (-0.4±0.1 vs 0.4±0.1; p<0.05) and concluded that soy drink replacement could reduce both systolic and diastolic blood pressure among overweight and obese female youths. However, this replacement had no significant results on weight and waist circumference.

Soy and Digestive system

Posted by Chantel M. Source from Division of Pharmasciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University.

In a study of " Protective effect of soy isoflavone genistein on ischemia-reperfusion in the rat small intestine." by Sato Y, Itagaki S, Oikawa S, Ogura J, Kobayashi M, Hirano T, Sugawara M, Iseki K. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that the possibility of a protective effect of genistein as enteral nutrition on I/R injury has not been investigated. We therefore investigated the protective effect of genistein on oxidative injury using intestinal I/R model rats. We found that genistein, which has combined antioxidant activity from radical scavenging, xanthine oxidase inhibition and chain-breaking effects, exhibits a protective effect on intestinal I/R injury. The results suggest that genistein, a soy isoflavone, has the possibility as a new nutrient formula of enteral feeding.

Soy and Muscle Protein

Posted by Chantel M. Source from Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, CANADA. phillis@mcmaster.ca

In a study of " The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion in young and elderly persons." by Phillips SM, Tang JE, Moore DR. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that New data suggest that whey protein is better able to support MPS than is soy protein, a finding that may explain the greater ability of whey protein to support greater net muscle mass gains with resistance exercise. This review focuses on evidence showing the differences in responses of MPS, and ultimately muscle protein accretion, to consumption of milk- and soy-based supplemental protein sources in humans.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Soy and Menstrual Symptoms

Posted by Chantel M. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

Although there are no direct research about The effectiveness of Soy in easing menstrual Symptoms, since soy contains high levels of rich in alpha linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid,I would like to bring you this study.
According to "Menstrual pain in Danish women correlated with low n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake." by Deutch B. (Source:Aarhus University, Denmark.), researcher found that On the contrary certain dietary habits, e.g. low intake of animal and fish products, and intakes of specific nutrients, were correlated with menstrual pain. The average dietary n-3/n-6 ratio of women with menstrual pain was 0.24. It was significantly higher among those with low intake of B12 coincident with low intake of n-3 (0.42, P < 0.001) (chi-square), with low n-3 intake coincident with low n-3/n-6 ratio (0.42, P < 0.005), and finally with low intake of B12 coincident with low n-3/n-6 ratio (0.47, P < 0.001), and concluded that the results were highly significant and mutually consistent and supported the hypothesis that a higher intake of marine n-3 fatty acids correlates with milder menstrual symptoms.

Blueberry Oatmeal Pancakes

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contribution by Soy Beginnings - A Product of Thumb Oilseed Producers


Ingredients:
1-1/4 cups rolled oats
2 cups Soy Milk
2 egg whites, lightly beaten
1 Tbs brown sugar
1 cup blueberries
1-1/2 cups flour (may be all or part whole wheat)
1 Tbs baking powder

Directions:
Combine the oats, Soy Milk, egg whites and brown sugar in a mixing bowl and let sit 10 minutes to soften.
Mix together the flour and baking powder; stir into the oat mixture. Stir in the blueberries (do not thaw if frozen).
Using 1/4 cup batter per pancake, cook on a nonstick or lightly oiled griddle or pan until bubbles form on the top. Turn over and cook until the underside is golden.

Yield: 18 pancakes (6 servings)
Serving size: 3 pancakes
Per serving: 252 calories, 3 g fat (0.4 g sat fat), 11 g pro, 46 g carb, 2.3 g fiber, 186 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol
Exchanges: 3 starch

Soy on the Grill

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contribution by Soy Beginnings - A Product of Thumb Oilseed Producers

Tempeh is a natural for a quick marinade: In about 20 minutes it will become suffused with the flavors of the liquid. Its firm texture, which some liken to hamburger, makes it right at home on the grill or under the broiler.

Ingredients:
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons sesame oil
4 teaspoons brown sugar
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 8-ounce packages tempeh

Directions:
Steam the tempeh over boiling water, in a covered pot, for 20 minutes. Mix everything else in a large bowl to make the marinade. Cut each block of tempeh in half, to make 4 portions, and marinate for 20 minutes. Grill over medium-hot coals for about 5 minutes per side.

Yield: 4 Servings.
Nutritional information per serving: 280 calories 4 grams fat 150 milligrams sodium

(This dish can also be made with tofu. Use extra-firm torn, cover with paper towels and a light weight and let it drain for about 15 minutes before putting into marinade.)

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Soy and Lipotoxicity in Liver

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by The Journal of Nutrition

In a study of "Soy Protein Affects Serum Insulin and Hepatic SREBP-1 mRNA and Reduces Fatty Liver in Rats" by Claudia Ascencio, Nimbe Torres, Fernando Isoard-Acosta, Francisco J. Gómez-Pérez, Rogelio Hernández-Pando and Armando R. Tovar (Departamentos de Fisiología de la Nutrición,; Endocrinología y Metabolismo, y; Patología Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán," Mexico City, Mexico) posted in The Journal of Nutrition, researchers found that rats fed the soy protein diet had significantly lower expression of SREBP-1 mRNA than rats fed the casein diet. Soy protein intake also reduced the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and malic enzyme, leading to low hepatic lipid depots of triglycerides and cholesterol, whereas rats fed the casein diet developed fatty liver. These data suggest that soy protein regulates SREBP-1 expression by modulating serum insulin concentration, thus preventing the development of fatty liver.

Soy and Anti-Photoaging

Posted by Chantel M. ©2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article
distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).


In a study of "Anti-Photoaging Effects of Soy Isoflavone Extract (Aglycone and Acetylglucoside Form) from Soybean Cake" by Chieh-Chen Huang, Bo-Yang Hsu, Nan-Lin Wu, Wen-Huei Tsui, Tzu-Ju Lin, Ching-Chieh Su and Chi-Feng Hung. researchers found that
1. Soy Isoflavone Extract Fraction 3 Inhibits UVB-Induced Keratinocyte Death,
2. Soy Isoflavone Extract Fraction 3 Attenuates the Level of Erythema and TEWL after UVB.
3. Soy Isoflavone Extract Fraction 3 Reduces the Epidermal Thickness
Exposure
4. Soy Isoflavone Extract Fraction 3 Decreases the Depletion of Catalase after UVB Exposure
5. Soy Isoflavone Extract Fraction 3 Suppresses the Expression of COX-2 and PCNA after UVB
Exposure
and concluded that In summary, our results demonstrated that soy isoflavone extract Fraction 3 from soybean cake
could prevent human keratinocyte apoptosis, attenuate the level of erythema and TEWL, reduce the
epidermal thickness and increase the catalase activity and inhibit COX-2 and PCNA expression in
response to UVB exposure. The results imply that Fraction 3 could decrease the UVB-induced
oxidative stress, inflammation and skin cell damage. In addition, in comparison with soy isoflavone
extract ISO-1 and genistein, Fraction 3 possessed the highest efficiency in reducing UVB-induced
oxidative stress and preventing human keratinocyte death. Therefore, the soy isoflavone extract
Fraction 3 is a superior anti-photoaging agent for skin care, and the advantages include the properties
that it is non-toxic, easily accessible, economical, convenient and environmentally friendly.

Soy and Menstrual Pain

Posted by Chantel M. Contributors: CN designed and coordinated the study and had overall responsibility for data analysis and writing the paper. KH and NS coordinated for sample collection. HS helped to design the study and undertook data interpretation.

In a study of "Associations of menstrual pain with intakes of soy, fat and dietary fiber in Japanese women" by Guarantor: C Nagata., posted in European Journal and clinical Nutrition, researcher found that Intake of dietary fiber was significantly inversely correlated with the menstrual pain scale (r=-0.12, P=0.04) after controlling for age, smoking status, age at menarche and total energy intake. Neither soy nor fat intake was significantly correlated with menstrual pain after controlling for the covariate with the conclusion of : The cross-sectional difference in dietary fiber intake across the level of menstrual pain was small in magnitude but warrants further studies


Monday, September 5, 2011

Apple-Nut Salad & Tofu-Honey Dressing Recipe

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contribution: Soyconnection.com


Ingredients:




Salad

5 Red Delicious apples, sliced
1/4 cup Fresh lemon juice
1 cup Water
3 Celery stalks, diced
8 ounces Pineapple tidbits, drained
1/3 cup Walnuts, coarsely chopped
1 Mint sprig as a garnish



Dressing
1 cup Plain low-fat yogurt
1/2 cup Soft tofu
1 tablespoon Honey
1 teaspoon Ground cinnamon
Instructions for Apple-Nut Salad & Tofu-Honey Dressing:

For the Salad
Place sliced apples in mixture of lemon juice and water. Add more water if needed to cover apples.
At serving time, drain liquid from apples. Combine apples, celery, pineapple and nuts.

For the Dressing
Combine yogurt, tofu, honey and cinnamon in a food processor and blend until smooth. Chill.
Combine apple mixture with dressing and toss gently. Garnish with mint sprigs.



Nutrition Per Serving:

Calories 119, Protein 4g, Carbohydrate 19g, Sodium 30mg, Total fat 4g, Calories from fat 29%, Cholesterol 2mg