Get Pregnant Naturally

Get Pregnant Naturally
".....Utilizing Traditional Chinese Medicine in Tonifying Energy flow to the Reproductive System Channels In Men and Women for Natural Conception, including Couple Who were diagnosed with Unexplained causes of Infertility...." Chantel M.

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Friday, October 28, 2011

Soy and coronary heart disease prevention

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Dietary soy-derived isoflavone phytoestrogens. Could they have a role in coronary heart disease prevention?" by Tikkanen MJ, Adlercreutz H., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that , lipophilic phytoestrogen derivatives could be incorporated into LDLs, increasing their oxidation resistance and antiproliferative efficacy ex vivo, both of which are, in theory, antiatherogenic effects

Soy and Cervical cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy-derived isoflavones inhibit HeLa cell growth by inducing apoptosis" by Xiao JX, Huang GQ, Geng X, Qiu HW., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, showed that SI-I inhibited HeLa cell growth through inducing apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway and comparisons with reported data indicated that synergistic effect existed between the isoflavone species contained in SI-I. It is proposed that natural soy-derived isoflavones are potential candidates as chemotherapeutic agents against human cervical cancer.

Soy and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in Prostate Cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "miRNAs Differentially Expressed in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines after Soy Treatment" by Rabiau N, Trraf HK, Adjakly M, Bosviel R, Guy L, Fontana L, Bignon YJ, Bernard-Gallon DJ., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that out of 377 miRNAs tested, 180, 170 and 150 miRNAs were amplified with 2% of variation in the triplicate in PC-3, DU145 and LNCap cells, respectively, and only 5 miRNAs for PC-3 and DU145 cells and 4 miRNAs for LNCap exhibited a significant change in their expression. Treatment with genistein or daidzein had similar effects on miRNA regulation to those of 5-AZA treatment and concluded that this work demonstrated a new role of isoflavones on the regulation of miRNAs in prostate cancer.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Soy and self-reported quality of life in post-menopausal women.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Effect of high-dose isoflavones on cognition, quality of life, androgens, and lipoprotein in post-menopausal women" by Basaria US, Wisniewski A, Dupree K, Bruno T, Song MY, Yao F, Ojumu A, John M, Dobs AS., posted in S National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that High-dose isoflavones is associated with improved QOL among women who have become menopausal recently. Hence, the timing of isoflavone supplementation with regards to the onset of menopause appears to be important. The use of isoflavones, as an alternative to estrogen therapy, may be potentially useful and seemingly safe in this group of women who are looking for relief from menopausal symptoms.

soy and seaweed supplements in healthy postmenopause

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Serum IGF-1 concentrations change with soy and seaweed supplements in healthy postmenopausal American women" by Teas J, Irhimeh MR, Druker S, Hurley TG, Hébert JR, Savarese TM, Kurzer MS., posted in posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic hormone important for growth and development. However, high-circulating serum concentrations in adults are associated with increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer....and concluded that Concurrent seaweed and soy consumption may be important in modifying the effect of soy on IGF-1 serum concentrations.

Soy isoflavones and Prevention of Breast Cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Combined effects of MDM2 SNP309 and TP53 R72P polymorphisms, and soy isoflavones on breast cancer risk among Chinese women in Singapore" by Koh WP, Van Den Berg D, Jin A, Wang R, Yuan JM, Yu MC., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that support experimental data implicating combined effects of MDM2 protein and the p53-mediated pathway in breast carcinogenesis, and suggest that soy isoflavones may exert protective effect via down-regulation of the MDM2 protein.

Tofu Vermicelli Salad

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed bt Chiliwonders.Com

Serve 3


Ingredients

  • 50 g cashew nuts, toasted
  • 300 g glass vermicelli or 'dongfen'
  • 1 stalk fresh coriander, chopped coarsely
  • 8 mint leaves, chopped coarsely
  • 5 basil leaves, chopped coarsely
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce,
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • Cut the following into long strands
  • 200 g fresh tofu,
  • 1 carrot,
  • 1 cucumber,
  • 20 g young ginger
  • 1 stalk spring onion
  • 1 fresh red chili
  • 4 tbsp lime juice

Method

  1. Soak the transparent vermicelli with lukewarm water for about 5 minutes, or till breakable when pulled.

  2. Rinse dry.

  3. Combine all ingredients, except tofu, and stir carefully.

  4. Add in tofu last and mix carefully, not to break it too much.

  5. Chill for 1 hour.

  6. Serve cold.

(Sources)

Stir fry tofu with capsicum

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed bt Chiliwonders.Com



Oil fry chopped garlic, ginger and tofu. Stir fry capsicum, mix all together. Add soy sauce, pepper. garnish with spring onion (Sources)

Tofu Delight

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed bt Chiliwonders.Com



Plain tofu dapped with salt, pepper, Italian spices, and dry corn flour. Deep fry for 30 sec. Hot and crispy. Serve hot with tabasco sauce or mayonnaise. Simple and delicious. (Sources)

Signature tofu

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed bt Chiliwonders.Com


Serve 4, cook time 25 minutes

Ingredients

2 pieces bean curd

75 g fish meat

1 egg white

(1 tbsp corn flour

1/4 tsp sesame oil

salt and pepper to taste)

spring onion, chopped

1 red chili, chopped finely

4 walnuts, finely chopped

2 slices ham, chopped

1 egg white and 1 tsp corn flour, mixed

Method

  1. Mash bean curd finely
  2. Mash fish meat, mix well with salt
    and egg white.
  3. Add bean curd and A and mix thoroughly.
  4. Steam the mixture in a container for
    20 minutes. Cool.
  5. Cut into strips, the size of fish fingers.
  6. Coat the top surface thinly with egg
    and flour mixture
  7. Place minced walnut and ham over strips.
  8. Coat each stick with corn flour, to prevent the walnut and ham pieces from loosening.
  9. Heat oil to fry the fritters till brown and crispy,
    1 minute for each stick.

  10. Garnish and serve hot with your favorite sauces, curried mayonnaise, chili sauces, satay sauces, Chinese chili sauce ...more

(Sources)

Stuffed tofu

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed bt Chiliwonders.Com

Stuffed tofu
Serve 3, cook time 10 minute


Ingredients and method

3 pieces soft tofu, using a spoon to slightly dent
a hole in the centre for stuffing purpose.

  • 50 prawns, chopped finely (optional)
  • 50 g fish meat, use blender to blend
  • 100 g minced pork
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp corn flour
  • corn flour mixture made from 3 tbsp
    wheat flour,1 tbsp corn flour and 3 tbsp water

Mix the above ingredients evenly.
Divide into 3 portions.
Stuff each piece of tofu with 1 portion of the mixture.
Coat with batter all over.

  • 1/2cup of chicken stock soup
  • 1 tsp chili sauce
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp chili sauce
  • 2 tbsp oil

Method

  1. Heat enough oil. Carefully add in
    stuffed bean curd. (meat side down to avoid separation). Fry till golden.
  2. Turn and brown the other side.
  3. Dish out. Leave 1/2 tbsp oil in the wok.
  4. Add the chicken stock mixture till boil.
  5. Put the liquid mixture at base of a plate
    to serve as sauce.
  6. Place the stuffed tofu on top of the sauce.
  7. Garnish and serve hot.

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Four Bean Salad

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Soy for Life (Source)





Combine these ingredients in a large bowl:
1 cup 250 mL Green beans
1 cup 250 mL Wax beans
1 cup 250 mL kidney beans
1 cup 250 mL Soybeans
1/2 cup 125 mL Diced celery
1/2 cup 125 mL Sliced onion

In a small saucepan, mix together:
1/4 cup 60 mL Soy oil
1/3 cup 75 mL Sugar
1/4 cup 60 mL Vinegar
1/2 tsp 2 mL Basil
2 tbsp 30 mL Parsley
A colourful make ahead picnic salad, this
recipe can be made with cooked or canned
beans. Remember to save the marinade to
store any leftover salad.
Boil the sauce, then pour over bean mixture.
Mix thoroughly. Refrigerate 24 hours before
serving. Drain salad before serving. Save
marinade to store any leftover salad.

Servings: 12

Nutritional Values Per Serving:
Calories 117
Protein 4 g
Carbohydrates 13 g
Fat 6 g







Marinated Asparagus

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Soy for Life


Marinated Asparagus


Ingredients
1 lb .45 kg Asparagus (or green
beans as substitute)
1/2 cup 100 ml Pristine Gourmet soybean oil
1/4 cup 50 ml Pristine Gourmet infused
wine vinegar - your choice
of flavour
1/2 tsp 2 ml Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tsp 2 ml Salt
1/2 tsp 2 ml Sugar
1/2 tsp 2 ml Dry mustard
1/2 tsp 2 ml Dried basil

Steam asparagus (or beans) until just tendercrisp. Cool in ice water and pat dry. Make the marinade by combining oil and remaining ingredients in a jar and shaking well. Place cooled asparagus in a shallow dish and pour marinade over it. refrigerate for one hour, turning occasionally.

(Source)

soybean and Intestinal bacteria

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "A brief historical overview of the past two decades of soy and isoflavone research' by Messina M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researcher indicated that it was hypothesized that individuals possessing the intestinal bacteria capable of converting the soybean isoflavone daidzein into the isoflavan equol were more likely to benefit from soy intake. More recently, in vitro and animal research has raised questions about the safety of isoflavone exposure for certain subsets of the population, although the human data are largely inconsistent with these concerns.

Soy protein and cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity" by McCarty MF., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children

Soy and Cancer Prevention

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Minimizing the cancer-promotional activity of cox-2 as a central strategy in cancer prevention" by McCarty MF., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Practical strategies for achieving a modest degree of calorie restriction may also have potential for down-regulating cox-2 expression while decreasing cancer risk. Soy isoflavones, linked to reduced cancer risk in Asian epidemiology, may suppress cox-2 induction by activating ERbeta. In aggregate, these considerations suggest that a comprehensive lifestyle strategy targeting cox-2 expression and bioactivity may have tremendous potential for cancer prevention.

Friday, October 21, 2011

Soy Protein and Kidney Function

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Beneficiary effect of dietary soy protein on lowering plasma levels of lipid and improving kidney function in type II diabetes with nephropathy" by Azadbakht L, Shakerhosseini R, Atabak S, Jamshidian M, Mehrabi Y, Esmaill-Zadeh A., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Soy inclusion in the diet can modify the risk factors of heart disease and improve kidney function in these patients.

Soy Protein and proteinuric glomerulopathies

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Short-term effects of soy protein diet in patients with proteinuric glomerulopathies.[Article in English, Portuguese]" by Ahmed MS, Calabria AC, Kirsztajn GM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers filed the result that we have not observed beneficial effects when using soy protein instead of animal protein with the aim of attenuating proteinuria and hyperlipidemia, but we have shown that soy protein has not caused deleterious changes in body composition, ensuring an adequate nutritional state.

Soy protein and Metabolic syndrome

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "[Evaluation of the intake of a low daily amount of soybeans in oxidative stress, lipid and inflammatory profile, and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome].[Article in Portuguese]" by Bahls LD, Venturini D, Scripes Nde A, Lozovoy MA, Simão TN, Simão AN, Dichi I, Morimoto HK., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Low intake of soy protein for 90 days, besides being well tolerated by the patients, was able to improve several parameters related to the pathophysiology of MS.

Easy Tofu

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Easy Dinner Recipes.ca
Description:

If you thought cooking tofu was tedious, here is a quick and easy recipe for tofu. A combination of pan-fried tofu and vegetables cooked in chicken broth. Basil and lemongrass add an Oriental touch.

Ingredients:

10 oz. extra-firm tofu
1 medium zucchini
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 habanero chili, seeded and thinly sliced
1 4-inch piece lemongrass, minced
1 medium shallot, thinly sliced
1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons fish sauce
juice of 1/2 lime
8-10 basil leaves, thinly sliced

Directions:

Cut the tofu into bite-size cubes. Cut the zucchini in half lengthwise and then slice the halves about 1/4-inch thick.
Heat the oil in a large non-stick skillet over a high heat. Just when the oil begins to smoke, add the tofu and zucchini. Toss the tofu and zucchini in the pan and then let them cook till browned.
Add the habanero, lemongrass and shallot. Cook till the zucchini is tender.
Pour in the chicken broth, fish sauce and lime juice and cook until the broth thickens. Sprinkle the sliced basil on top just before serving.

Tips: Make sure you drain out any excess water from the tofu and pat it dry before you start cooking it.

(Source)

Tofu Scramble


Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Easy Dinner Recipes.ca

Description:

Tofu Scramble is a fantastic combination of tofu, colorful bell peppers and tomatoes and crunchy sesame seeds. If you thought healthy food doesn’t taste great, think again!

Ingredients:

Tofu Scramble is a fantastic combination of tofu, colorful bell peppers and tomatoes and crunchy sesame seeds. If you thought healthy food doesn’t taste great, think again!

Ingredients:

Serves 4
½ red bell pepper
½ yellow red bell pepper
½ green bell pepper
2 small tomatoes
½ small red onion
1 small potato
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 pack firm tofu (about 14 oz.)
¼ cup raw sesame seeds

Directions:

Chop the bell peppers and tomatoes. Slice the onion thinly. Grate the potato coarsely. Drain and rinse tofu and then crumble it with your fingers.

Heat olive oil in deep skillet or flat-bottomed wok. Add the bell peppers, tomatoes, onions and potatoes. Sauté over high heat for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the crumbled tofu to the skillet along with the sesame seeds and toss well. Sauté for 2 minutes and take off the heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

Tips: If you're a cheese lover, you could add about half a cup of grated cheese along with the tofu.

(Source)

Mapo Tofu

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe contributed by Easy Dinner Recipes.ca





Description:

Here is an authentic and delicious recipe for Mapo Tofu, a spicy specialty from the Sichuan province of China. Savor the combination of tofu, ground beef and chili bean paste in this classic Chinese dish.

Ingredients:

1 block soft tofu
4 oz ground beef
3 tablespoons chili bean paste
1 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, crushed
1 -2 dried, whole chilis
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice wine
3 slices of ginger
4 green onions
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
1/4 cup chicken stock
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Salt to taste

Directions:

Pat the tofu dry using paper towels and cut into 1 inch cubes. Separate the white parts from the green onions and set aside. Chop the green parts into 3 inch long sections.

Heat 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a wok or skillet over a moderate heat. Add the ground beef and cook until the beef is browned. Sieve the beef to drain the fat and set aside.

In the same wok or skillet, heat the remaining vegetable oil over a moderate heat. Add the ginger slices, white parts of the green onion, whole chilis and ground Sichuan peppercorns and cook for about a minute. Add the ground beef, the chili bean paste, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine, white pepper, and sugar, and cook for another minute or two. Next add the tofu, green parts of the green onions, chicken stock and simmer for about 15 minutes. Stir occasionally but make sure the tofu does not disintegrate. While the stock is simmering, mix the cornstarch with a little water. Add the cornstarch to the stock and cook till it thickens.

Garnish with chopped green onions. Serve with white rice.

Tips:

You can vary the number of dried chilis. For a really spicy tofu, use about 5-6 chilis.

(Source)

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Soy and Growth of pathogenic bacteria

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Inhibition of growth of pathogenic bacteria in raw milk by legume protein esters" by Mahgoub S, Osman A, Sitohy M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Supplementation of raw milk with esterified soybean protein (0.5%) reduced the maximum level of titratable acidity to 0.21 and maintained the pH level at 6.4 after 8 days of storage under cold conditions as compared with 4 days for untreated raw milk. Similar results were observed when raw milk was stored at room temperature for 10 h.

Soy and muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion in young and elderly persons" by Phillips SM, Tang JE, Moore DR., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers wrote that new data suggest that whey protein is better able to support MPS than is soy protein, a finding that may explain the greater ability of whey protein to support greater net muscle mass gains with resistance exercise. This review focuses on evidence showing the differences in responses of MPS, and ultimately muscle protein accretion, to consumption of milk- and soy-based supplemental protein sources in humans.

Soy Protein and Obesity-related comorbidities.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy protein isolate modified metabolic phenotype and hepatic wnt signaling in obese zucker rats" by Cain J, Banz WJ, Butteiger D, Davis JE., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that these data confirm the protective SPI attenuated obesity-related metabolic dysfunction conceivably through regulation of adipogenic programming, as evident by changes in AT morphology and hepatic Wnt signaling. Collectively, this study confirmed the potential utilization of soy protein and its bioactive ingredients for prevention and treatment of obesity-related comorbidities.

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Soy isoflavones and Ovariectomy on the salivary glands

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Effect of estrogen therapy, soy isoflavones, and the combination therapy on the submandibular gland of ovariectomized rats" by Carvalho VD, Silveira VÁ, do Prado RF, Carvalho YR., US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that all treatments caused an increase in ducts and acini compared to the placebo group. It was concluded that the estrogen deficiency may be related to salivary gland function due to a reduction in the quantity of salivary acini and ducts secondary to ovariectomy. The estrogen therapy, soy isoflavone therapy, and the combination of both are effective in reducing the effects of ovariectomy on the salivary glands.

Soy isoflavones and Cancer prevention

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Genistein, an epigenome modifier during cancer prevention" by Zhang Y, Chen H., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Genistein, one of the soy-derived bioactive isoflavones, affects tumorigenesis through epigenetic regulations. By modulating chromatin configuration and DNA methylation, genistein activates tumor suppressor genes and affects cancer cell survival. Here, we summarize and discuss both in vitro and in vivo studies in the field that investigate the effect of genistein on histone modifications and DNA methylation. The promising role of genistein in cancer prevention and therapeutic applications will be discussed from an epigenetic point of view.

Soy isoflavones and Colon Cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Genistein inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells by attenuating a negative effect of epidermal growth factor on tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity" by Qi W, Weber CR, Wasland K, Savkovic SD., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Genistein inhibited EGF-induced proliferation, while favoring dephosphorylation and nuclear retention of FOXO3 (active state) in colon cancer cells. Upstream of FOXO3, genistein acts via the PI3K/Akt pathway to inhibit EGF-stimulated FOXO3 phosphorylation (i.e. favors active state). Downstream, EGF-induced disassociation of FOXO3 from mutated tumor suppressor p53, but not wild type p53, is inhibited by genistein favoring FOXO3-p53(mut) interactions with the promoter of the cell cycle inhibitor p27kip1 in colon cancer cells. Thus, the FOXO3-p53(mut) complex leads to elevated p27kip1 expression and promotes cell cycle arrest.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Soy isoflavones and cancer cells radiotherapy

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In The study of "Soy isoflavones sensitize cancer cells to radiotherapy" by Hillman GG, Singh-Gupta V., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Soy isoflavones could be an effective complementary treatment given that they inhibit the survival signaling pathways of various cancer cells through altered activation of APE1/Ref-1, NF-κB, and HIF-1α, which are genes essential for tumor cell survival, tumor growth, and angiogenesis, thus making such cells more sensitive to radiotherapy. Studies in which soy isoflavones were given in conjunction with radiotherapy to prostate cancer patients suggest that soy isoflavones might also mitigate the adverse effects of radiation on normal tissues, probably by acting as antioxidants. These observations open new avenues for exploiting soy isoflavones as supplements to conventional therapies.

The role of isoflavones in menopausal health consensus opinion of The North American Menopause Society.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the report of "The role of isoflavones in menopausal health: consensus opinion of The North American Menopause Society" [No authors listed], posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health
, the Society wrote that although the observed health effects in humans cannot be clearly attributed to isoflavones alone, it is clear that foods or supplements that contain isoflavones have some physiologic effects. Clinicians may wish to recommend that menopausal women consume whole foods that contain isoflavones, especially for the cardiovascular benefits of these foods; however, a level of caution needs to be observed in making these recommendations. Additional clinical trials are needed before specific recommendations can be made regarding increased consumption of foods or supplements that contain high amounts of isoflavones.

Soy and risk and benefits of soy products for peri- and postmenopausal women.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "The role of soy isoflavones in menopausal health: report of The North American Menopause Society/Wulf H. Utian Translational Science Symposium in Chicago, IL (October 2010)" by North American Menopause Society, posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, the Society concluded that Several areas for further research have been identified on soy and midlife women. More clinical studies are needed that compare outcomes among women whose intestinal bacteria have the ability to convert daidzein to equol (equol producers) with those that lack that ability (equol nonproducers) in order to determine if equol producers derive greater benefits from soy supplementation. Larger studies are needed in younger postmenopausal women, and more research is needed to understand the modes of use of soy isoflavone supplements in women. The interrelations of other dietary components on soy isoflavones consumed as a part of diet or by supplement on equol production also require further study, as do potential interactions with prescription and over-the-counter medications. And finally, greater standardization and documentation of clinical trial data of soy are needed.

Soy and Emulsion after gastrointestinal cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "Randomized clinical trial of intravenous soybean oil alone versus soybean oil plus fish oil emulsion after gastrointestinal cancer surgery" by Jiang ZM, Wilmore DW, Wang XR, Wei JM, Zhang ZT, Gu ZY, Wang S, Han SM, Jiang H, Yu K., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Baseline data were comparable in the two groups. There were fewer infectious complications (four versus 12 on day 8; P = 0.066), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was significantly less common (four versus 13; P = 0.039) and hospital stay was significantly shorter (mean(s.d.) 15(5) versus 17(8) days; P = 0.041) in the treatment group. Total postoperative medical costs were comparable in the two groups (mean(s.d.) US $ 1269(254) and 1302(324) in treatment and control groups respectively; P = 0.424). The median (interquartile range) difference in CD4/CD8 between days 1 and 8 after surgery was + 0.30 (0.06 to 0.79) in patients receiving fish oil and + 0.20 (-0.19 to 0.55) in controls (P = 0.021). No severe adverse events occurred in either group.

Soy and fibrocystic breast disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "What effect, if any, does soy protein have on breast tissue?" by Fleming RM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researcher found that This is the first in vivo study looking at the effect of soy protein on breast tissue health. The findings are promising and showed both objective and subjective findings consistent with a reduction in fibrocystic disease of the breast. Further research is needed to confirm these findings in a greater number of women and to determine if soy protein has the same beneficial effect in atypia and breast cancer.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Stir-Fried Asian Tofu

Recipe by: MasterCook, posted in Tofu-Recipe.com

Serving Size : 4

- 8 oz firm tofu, -- drained and weighted for 30 minutes
- 1/2 ts grated tangerine or lemon zest
- 2 TB orange juice
- Salt and pepper
- 2 TB hoisin sauce
- 1 TB rice wine vinegar
- 1 TB low sodium soy sauce 1/2 ts sugar
- 1 ts cornstarch
- 1 TB each vegetable and sesame oil
- 1 lg clove garlic, -- minced Quarter-size piece fresh ginger, -- minced
- 4 oz mushrooms, -- stemmed and thinly sliced mushrooms
- 3 c 3/4-inch broccoli florets
- Salt and crushed red pepper

Cut the tofu into 3/4-inch squares and marinate in citrus zest and juice; season with salt and pepper. Combine hoisin, rice vinegar, soy sauce, sugar and cornstarch; reserve for later. In a 12-inch skillet heat vegetable and sesame oils until very hot. Add garlic and ginger and stir fry for 10 seconds. Add mushrooms and broccoli, some water, cover and steam for 2 minutes or until mushrooms and broccoli begin to get tender. Add tofu. Stir hoisin sauce to recombine cornstarch and add to skillet. Cover and simmer 30 seconds to a minute to thicken. Season with salt and crushed red pepper.

Recipe by: Master Cook

(Source)

Sauteed Firm Tofu

Recipe by: MasterCook, posted in Tofu-Recipe.com

Serving Size : 4

- 24 oz Firm tofu
- 2 tb Oil
- 1/2 ts Salt
- 1 sm Onions -- sliced thin
- 6 md Mushrooms -- sliced
- 1 sm Carrot -- cut into matchsticks
- 2 md Peppers, bell, green -sliced thin
- 1 tb Sake
- 1 1/2 tb Soy sauce
- 1 t Ginger -- grated
- 1 tb Sugar, granulated
- 1 tb water
- 1 t Cornstarch -- dissolved in 3 T water

Cut tofu crosswise into pieces the shape of French-fried potatoes. Heat a wok, coat with oil & sprinkle on the salt. Add onion, then the mushrooms, stir frying each over high heat for about 30 seconds. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add carrot, green pepper & tofu in that order, sauteeing each for about 1 minute. Reduce heat to low & add sake, soy sauce, ginger, sugar & water. Simmer for 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in dissolved cornstarch & simmer 30 seconds for another 30 seconds. Shurtleff & Aoyagi, "The Book of Tofu"

Recipe by: MasterCook

(Source)

Soy and Genistein-induced neuronal apoptosis

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US national library of medicine, National Institute of health

In the study of "Genistein-induced neuronal apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest is associated with MDC1 up-regulation and PLK1 down-regulation" by Ismail IA, Kang KS, Lee HA, Kim JW, Sohn YK., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers wrote that Genistein also increased the phosphorylation of Chk2 and Cdc25C at Thr-68 and Ser-216, respectively. In addition, consistently with PLK1 down-regulation, the phosphorylation of Cdc25C at Ser-198 was markedly decreased after genistein treatment. Additionally, Chk2, Cdc25C, Cyclin B1, p-Cyclin B1 (Ser-147), and Cdc2 as well as Bcl-2 proteins were down-regulated after genistein treatment. Altogether, these results suggest for the first time the involvement of MDC1 up-regulation after genistein treatment in DNA damage-induced Chk2 activation- and PLK1 down-regulation-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle checkpoint pathways.

Soy and ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US national library of medicine, National Institute of health

According to the study of "[Proliferation inhibition and apoptosis onset in human ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3 induced by Genistein].[Article in Chinese]" by Li Y, Mi C., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Genistein could inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV(3). Its inhibitory effect appears to be due to the up-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) mRNA and protein expression, down-regulation of PCNA and cyclin B1 protein. The onset of apoptosis in ovarian carcinoma cell is related to the up-regulation of bax and down-regulation of bcl-2 in mRNA and protein level induced by Genistein.

Soy and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma cells

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US national library of medicine, National Insitute of health

In a study of "Genistein inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma cells in vitro" by Li W, Frame LT, Hoo KA, Li Y, D'Cunha N, Cobos E., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that The cell line sensitivity to genistein treatment based on the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values in decreasing order of toxicity was found to be as follows: RS4;11 (4.89 ? 4.28 ?M) > GA10 (13.08 ? 3.49 ?M) > Toledo (16.94 ? 3.89 ?M) > CEM (17.31 ? 0.72 ?M) > OPM-2 (46.76 ? 2.26 ?M) > U266 (128.82 ? 1.90 ?M). The mechanism of growth inhibition was through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The concomitant altered expression of apoptosis pathway proteins and cell cycle modulators (caspases 9, 3, 7, PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase], cIAP1 [inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1], Bcl-2 and cyclin B1) were observed by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. In addition, some malignancy-related embryologic pathway proteins, e.g. Notch1 and Gli1, were modulated by genistein treatment in sensitive cell lines.

Saturday, October 15, 2011

Soy and Anabolism

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of `Dietary protein to support anabolism with resistance exercise in young men`by Phillips SM, Hartman JW, Wilkinson SB., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that If our acute findings are accurate then we hypothesized that chronically the greater net protein deposition associated with milk protein consumption post-resistance exercise would eventually lead to greater net protein accretion (i.e., muscle fiber hypertrophy), over a longer time period. In young men completing 12 weeks of resistance training (5d/wk) we observed a tendency (P = 0.11) for greater gains in whole body lean mass and whole as greater muscle fiber hypertrophy with consumption of milk. While strength gains were not different between the soy and milk-supplemented groups we would argue that the true significance of a greater increase in lean mass that we observed with milk consumption may be more important in groups of persons with lower initial lean mass and strength such as the elderly.

Soy and Muscle protein synthesis and Muscle protein accretion

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of `The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion in young and elderly persons`by Phillips SM, Tang JE, Moore DR., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that whey protein is better able to support MPS than is soy protein, a finding that may explain the greater ability of whey protein to support greater net muscle mass gains with resistance exercise. This review focuses on evidence showing the differences in responses of MPS, and ultimately muscle protein accretion, to consumption of milk- and soy-based supplemental protein sources in humans.

Soy and Nipple aspirate fluid

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of `Influence of diet on nipple aspirate fluid production and estrogen levels`by Morimoto Y, Conroy SM, Pagano IS, Franke AA, Stanczyk FZ, Maskarinec G., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that isoflavonoid and soy consumption suggested inverse associations (p = 0.01 and p = 0.08). For estrogens in NAF, total fat and monounsaturated fat intake was positively associated with E(2) (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02) and in serum, alcohol intake was associated with higher E(1)S levels (p = 0.02). These findings suggest a weak influence of dietary composition on NAF production and estrogen levels in serum and NAF.

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Soy and uterine cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Genistein Selectively Inhibits Estrogen-Induced Cell Proliferation and Other Responses to Hormone Stimulation in the Prepubertal Rat Uterus" by Gaete L, Tchernitchin AN, Bustamante R, Villena J, Lemus I, Gidekel M, Cabrera G, Carrillo O., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Pretreatment with this phytoestrogen completely inhibited estradiol-induced mitoses in uterine luminal epithelium, endometrial stroma, and myometrium and partially inhibited estradiol-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. These findings indicate that genistein protects against estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and suggest that future studies should investigate the possibility of using this agent to decrease the risk for uterine cancer after hormone replacement therapy in climacteric

Differential effects of whole soy extract and soy isoflavones

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Differential effects of whole soy extract and soy isoflavones on apoptosis in prostate cancer cells" by Hsu A, Bray TM, Helferich WG, Doerge DR, Ho E., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers concluded that the induction of apoptosis was independent of the NF kappaB pathway. Food products that bear a combination of active compounds may be more efficacious and safer as chemo-preventive agents than individual compounds. This 'whole-food'-based approach is significant for the development of public health recommendations for prostate cancer prevention.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Soy Sauce on Anemia Prevention in Children

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "[Efficiency of NaFeEDTA fortified soy sauce on anemia prevention].[Article in Chinese]" by Zhao X, Lu Q, Wang S, Yin S., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that the soy sauce fortified with NaFeEDTA can increase the Hb level and decrease the prevalence of anemia in the children, and the NaFeEDTA fortified soy sauce can enhance the weight gain and the pull up of the subcutaneous fat. It is suggested that using NaFeEDTA fortified soy sauce in high IDA prevalence population was an efficient way for IDA preventing.

Soy and Iron Deficiency Anemia

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of "[Effect of NaFeEDTA fortified soy sauce on iron deficiency anemia in students].[Article in Chinese]" by Huo J, Sun J, Miao H, Yu B., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that The results showed that Hb, serum iron, ferrtin and transferrin of the intervention groups had improved and erythrocyte protoporphyrin, total iron binding capacity decreased. There were no differences between the two intervention groups after the trial. The parameters of both intervention groups were much better than those of the control group. The results suggested that NaFeEDTA fortified soy sauce had positive influence on IDA.

Soy and Peanut allergy

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In astudy of "Soybean isoflavones regulate dendritic cell function and suppress allergic sensitization to peanut" byMasilamani M, Wei J, Bhatt S, Paul M, Yakir S, Sampson HA., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that dietary isoflavones suppress allergic sensitization and protect against peanut allergy in vivo. Dietary supplementation of soybean isoflavones could be a novel strategy to prevent the development of allergic reactions to food.

Soy and Gene expression

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Soy food supplementation, dietary fat reduction and peripheral blood gene expression in postmenopausal women - A randomized, controlled trial" by Wang J, Siegmund K, Tseng CC, Lee AS, Wu AH., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that there were notable changes in gene expression associated with the intervention in the VLFD and SFD groups. Our findings suggest that the expression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and genes related to Fc γ R-mediated phagocytosis and cytokine interactions may be significantly altered in association with dietary fat reduction and soy supplementation. Gene expression changes in NAMPT were somewhat dampened with adjustment for weight but changes related to Fc γ R-mediated phagocytosis and cytokine interactions remained largely unchanged. Conclusion: PBMCs can reveal novel gene expression changes in association with controlled dietary intervention.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

The Best Ugly Turkey By: S Randles

Posted by Chantel M. recipe contributed by alllrescipes.com Canada (Source)

Ingredients

  • 1 (12 pound) whole turkey, neck and giblets removed
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1 apple - peeled, cored and cubed
Prep Time:
30 Min
Cook Time:
3 Hrs
Ready In:
4 Hrs

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) Rinse the turkey inside and out and pat dry with paper towels. Rub olive oil and salt all over the bird. Place the apple pieces inside of the cavity. Place the turkey breast side down in a large roasting pan.
  2. Roast for 3 hours in the preheated oven. Remove from the oven and carefully turn the bird so the breast side is facing up. Return to the oven and cook until the internal temperature of the thickest part of the thigh has reached 180 degrees F (82 degrees C). Allow the turkey to rest for about 30 minutes before carving.
Original Recipe Yield 12 servings

Soy Milk Pumpkin Pie a Thankgiving's Recipe

Posted by Chantel M. recipe contributed by my recipe

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 can (15 oz.) pumpkin
  • 1 1/4 cups soy milk (10 oz.)
  • 2 large eggs
  • Pastry for a single-crust 9-inch pie, purchased (thawed if frozen) or homemade

Preparation

  • 1. In a large bowl, mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Add pumpkin, soy milk, and eggs; whisk until well blended. Pour mixture into unbaked pastry in pan.
  • 2. Set pie on bottom rack of a 425° regular or convection oven. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce temperature to 350°; continue baking until center of pie is set and a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean, about 45 minutes longer.
  • 3. Set pie on a rack until cool, at least 2 hours. After serving, chill pie airtight.
Yield: Makes 8 servings

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Strawberry Ice Cream

Posted by Chantel M. recipe contributed by the ice cream maker (Source)

Ingredients:

1 ½ lbs of ripe strawberries, washed, dried and hulled
2 tsps lemon juice
½ C sugar
1 ½ C plain soy milk
2 tsp of vodka or liqueur of your choice (optional)


  1. Toss the strawberries with the lemon juice and sugar and mash them a little with a fork. Allow to marinate for about 30 minutes.

  2. Mix strawberries in soy milk and add liqueur if using.

  3. Process mixture in a blender until smooth or only small pieces of fruit remain.

  4. Pour into ice cream maker.
You can create any number of soy ice cream recipes by simply changing the berries in this one: blueberries, raspberries, blackberries … or various combinations.Have fun experimenting!

Saturday, October 8, 2011

Are Soy isoflavones safe?

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In a study of isoflavones and plant extracts were tested for their effect on cell proliferation, apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest. Isoflavones and plant extracts were applied in proliferation assays on 11 human cancer cell lines (representing cancers of the colon, prostate, breast, cervix, liver, pancreas, stomach and ovaries) and a fibroblast line to detect cytotoxic activity, conducted by University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, posted in
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers filed the conclusion that Isoflavones and plant extracts from soy and red clover, respectively, do not promote the growth of human cancer cells but induce decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These results indicate that isoflavones can be considered safe compounds.

Roasted Peach Ice Cream

Posted by Chantel M. recipe contributed by the ice cream maker (Source)

This recipe boosts the flavor of firm-fleshed fruit by roasting them first. We use peaches here, but you could try the same technique with apricots, nectarines or plums.

Ingredients:

4 C peaches, washed, pitted and cut in pieces
1 Tbs oil
1 C soy milk
½ C Demerara sugar (light brown sugar)
1 tsp vanilla
2 tsp Bourbon or rum (optional)


  1. Preheat oven to 400F (200C).

  2. Spread the peaches evenly in a shallow pan and drizzle them with the oil, then mix so pieces are evenly coated.

  3. Spread in single layer and roast in oven until very soft, about 30 minutes.

  4. Heat the soy milk and sugar until melted.

  5. Add peaches to soy milk and allow to cool.

  6. Once cool, blend the mixture in a food processor until smooth, or, if you prefer small pieces of fruit in your ice cream, until only small pieces remain.

  7. Mix in vanilla and Bourbon.

  8. Pour into ice cream maker.

Vanilla / Chocolate Soy Milk Ice Cream Recipe

Posted by Chantel M. recipe contributed by the ice cream maker

Ingredients:

1 C powdered sugar
4 egg yolks
1 tsp cornstarch
2 C soy milk
1 vanilla bean or 1 tsp of high quality vanilla essence


  1. Beat the eggs yolks with the powdered sugar and cornstarch.

  2. If using a vanilla bean, scrape the seeds into the soy milk.
  3. Warm the soy milk in a medium saucepan.

  4. Temper the egg mixture: slowly pour in a cup of hot soy milk while continuously beating the eggs. Then add the rest of the soy milk, while whisking.

  5. If using vanilla essence, add it now.

  6. Return the mixture to the pan. Stir until mixture thickens and reaches 170F (76 C) or coats the back of a wooden spoon.

  7. Strain the mixture and chill until cool.

  8. Pour into ice cream maker. (Source)


Chocolate soy milk ice cream in a glass

Soy and Fibroadenomas

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Biomarkers of dietary exposure are associated with lower risk of breast fibroadenomas in Chinese women" by Dijkstra SC, Lampe JW, Ray RM, Brown R, Wu C, Li W, Chen C, King IB, Gao D, Hu Y, Shannon J, Wähälä K, Thomas DB., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that circulating concentrations of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol, and ferritin were not associated with fibroadenoma risk. The inverse associations between plasma isoflavone concentrations and RBC EPA and DPA and fibroadenoma risk suggest that higher intakes of soy foods and fatty fish may lower the risk of fibroadenomas.

Friday, October 7, 2011

Black Soybean Ragout

Posted by Chantel M. Recipe Contributed by Soyconnection.com

Ingredients:


2 tablespoons Soy oil
8 Smoked or roasted garlic cloves
1 1/2 teaspoons Salt
1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon Cumin
4 cups Black soybeans, cooked
1 cup Tomato juice
4 teaspoons Garlic paste
1 cup Diced tomatoes
1/4 cup Onion, diced
Instructions for Black Soybean Ragout:

Place soy oil, garlic, salt, cayenne pepper and cumin into food processor. Process until a paste forms.

Over medium heat, sauté beans until just warm.

Add ½ cup tomato juice, garlic paste, tomatoes and onions. Sauté for 5 minutes.

Add remaining tomato juice and sauté 5 more minutes.

(Source)