Get Pregnant Naturally

Get Pregnant Naturally
".....Utilizing Traditional Chinese Medicine in Tonifying Energy flow to the Reproductive System Channels In Men and Women for Natural Conception, including Couple Who were diagnosed with Unexplained causes of Infertility...." Chantel M.

Permanent Unwanted Tattoo Removal by Tattoo Expert

Permanent Unwanted Tattoo Removal by Tattoo Expert
Safely, Painlessly, Laserlessly and Naturally in Removing any Unwanted Tattoos in 2 to 8 Weeks, Guaranteed

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Soy isoflavonoid and endogenous estrogen metabolism


Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the studies of "Soy isoflavonoid effects on endogenous estrogen metabolism in postmenopausal female monkeys" by Wood CE, Register TC, Cline JM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that long-term exposure to soy isoflavonoids, equol in particular, may facilitate endogenous estrogen clearance and catabolism to more benign 2-hydroxylated metabolites.

soybean glyceollins and potential cancer-protective antiestrogenic effects

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Effects of soybean glyceollins and estradiol in postmenopausal female monkeys" by Wood CE, Clarkson TB, Appt SE, Franke AA, Boue SM, Burow ME, McCoy T, Cline JM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that soybean glyceollins are natural compounds with potential estrogen-modulating properties in the breast.

Soy isoflavones (Glyceollins ) and adipocyte activity and nutrient metabolism.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

Om the studies of "Glyceollin-elicited soy protein consumption induces distinct transcriptional effects compared to standard soy protein" by Wood CE, Boue SM, Collins-Burow BM, Rhodes LV, Register TC, Cline JM, Dewi FN, Burow ME., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that The GLY diet also resulted in lower serum total cholesterol, specifically non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased serum triglycerides compared to the C/L diet. No effects of GLY or SOY were seen on serum insulin, adipocytokines, or vascular and bone turnover markers. These preliminary findings suggest that glyceollin-enriched soy protein has divergent effects from standard soy with some specificity for adipocyte activity and nutrient metabolism.

soy isoflavones and the production of prostate-specific antigen.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Combined inhibitory effects of soy isoflavones and curcumin on the production of prostate-specific antigen" by Ide H, Tokiwa S, Sakamaki K, Nishio K, Isotani S, Muto S, Hama T, Masuda H, Horie S., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that isoflavones and curcumin could modulate serum PSA levels. Curcumin presumably synergizes with isoflavones to suppress PSA production in prostate cells through the anti-androgen effects.

Soy Isoflavone and Lung Cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Isoflavone intake and risk of lung cancer: a prospective cohort study in Japan"by Shimazu T, Inoue M, Sasazuki S, Iwasaki M, Sawada N, Yamaji T, Tsugane S; Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Group., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that During 11 y (671,864 person-years) of follow-up, we documented 481 male and 178 female lung cancer cases. In men we found an inverse association between isoflavone intake and risk of lung cancer in never smokers (n = 13,051; multivariate HR in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of isoflavone intake: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.90; P for trend = 0.024) but not in current or past smokers. A similar, nonsignificant inverse association was seen in never-smoking women (n = 38,211; HR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.41, 1.10; P for trend = 0.135). We also tested effect modification by smoking status (P for interaction = 0.085 in men and 0.055 in men and women combined) and concluded that in a large-scale, population-based, prospective study in Japan, isoflavone intake was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in never smokers

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Hot and Spicy Tofu

By: RITALINCINDY, posted in Allrecipes.com (Source)


Prep Time:
10 Min
Cook Time:
12 Min
Ready In:
22 Min

Servings 4


Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 1 pound firm tofu, cubed
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 1 green chile pepper, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/3 cup hot water
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Directions

  1. Heat peanut oil in a wok or large frying pan over medium-high heat. Toss the tofu into the oil, and cook until browned on all sides. Once browned, toss in onion, bell pepper, chile pepper, and garlic; cook until just tender, about 5 minutes.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the hot water, vinegar, soy sauce, brown sugar, cornstarch, and red pepper flakes. Pour over tofu and vegetables, toss to coat, and simmer 3 to 5 minutes, or until sauce thickens slightly.


Crispy Barbequed Tofu Slices

By: JILLKEN, posted in Allrecipes.com (Source)


Prep Time:
10 Min
Cook Time:
25 Min
Ready In:
8 Hrs 35 Min

Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 (16 ounce) package extra firm tofu
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 tablespoon barbeque sauce
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 cup barbeque sauce

Directions

  1. Drain tofu, and slice into strips. Place in a plastic bag or container, and freeze overnight. This will give the tofu a meatier texture. Thaw tofu strips, and blot with paper towels to dry.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg white and 1 tablespoon of barbeque sauce. Combine the flour, salt, and pepper in a separate bowl. Dip the tofu slices into the egg mixture, then into the flour mixture, shaking off excess flour. Fry in the hot oil for about 1 minute on each side, until golden brown. Just fry enough at one time so they are not crowded. Remove from the oil to paper towels to drain and cool.
  3. Preheat the oven's broiler. Brush tofu slices with additional barbeque sauce, and allow to marinate while the broiler heats up. Arrange them on a broiler pan, or wire rack set over a cookie sheet for best results.
  4. Position the oven rack about 6 inches from the heat source. Broil for 5 minutes on each side, or until browned and crisp, watching closely so as not to burn them. Serve warm with the remaining barbeque sauce for dipping.

Footnotes

  • Editor's Note
  • The nutrition data for this recipe includes the full amount of the breading ingredients. The actual amount of the breading consumed will vary.

Coconut Curry Tofu

By: KATHYCOLLINS, posted in Allrecipes.com (source)


Prep Time:
25 Min
Cook Time:
15 Min
Ready In:
40 Min

Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 2 bunches green onions
  • 1 (14 ounce) can light coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons chile paste
  • 1 pound firm tofu, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
  • 4 roma (plum) tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces fresh mushrooms, chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 4 cups chopped bok choy
  • salt to taste

Directions

  1. Remove white parts of green onions, and finely chop. Chop greens into 2 inch pieces.
  2. In a large heavy skillet over medium heat, mix coconut milk, 3 tablespoons soy sauce, brown sugar, curry powder, ginger, and chile paste. Bring to a boil.
  3. Stir tofu, tomatoes, yellow pepper, mushrooms, and finely chopped green onions into the skillet. Cover, and cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mix in basil and bok choy. Season with salt and remaining soy sauce. Continue cooking 5 minutes, or until vegetables are tender but crisp. Garnish with remaining green onion.

Tofu Parmigiana

By: Jill B. Mittelstadt , posted in Allrecipes.com (Source)

Prep Time:
25 Min
Cook Time:
20 Min
Ready In:
45 Min


Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs
  • 5 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano, divided
  • salt to taste
  • ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 (12 ounce) package firm tofu
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 4 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, combine bread crumbs, 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese, 1 teaspoon oregano, salt, and black pepper.
  2. Slice tofu into 1/4 inch thick slices, and place in bowl of cold water. One at a time, press tofu slices into crumb mixture, turning to coat all sides.
  3. Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook tofu slices until crisp on one side. Drizzle with a bit more olive oil, turn, and brown on the other side.
  4. Combine tomato sauce, basil, garlic, and remaining oregano. Place a thin layer of sauce in an 8 inch square baking pan. Arrange tofu slices in the pan. Spoon remaining sauce over tofu. Top with shredded mozzarella and remaining 3 tablespoons Parmesan.
  5. Bake at 400 degrees F (205 degrees C) for 20 minutes.

Baked Tofu Spinach Wrap

By: VIKIM, posted in Allrecipes.com (source)



Prep Time: 3 Min
Cook Time: 2 Min
Ready In: 5 Min

Ingredients

  • 2 (10 inch) whole wheat tortillas
  • 1 (7.5 ounce) package hickory flavor baked tofu
  • 1/2 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup fresh baby spinach
  • 1 tablespoon Ranch dressing
  • 1 tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese, or to taste

Directions

  1. Place the tortillas side by side on a paper plate. Slice tofu, and place slices down the center of each tortilla. Sprinkle cheese over the tofu. Cover with a damp paper towel, and heat in the microwave for about 45 seconds, or until cheese is melted.
  2. Pile some spinach onto each tortilla, and pour on some Ranch dressing. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese, roll tortillas around the filling, and eat.

Monday, December 12, 2011

Soy and Human hepatoma cells

In the study of "Increased expression of catalase in human hepatoma cells by the soy isoflavone, daidzein" by Kampkötter A, Wiegand C, Timpel C, Röhrdanz E, Chovolou Y, Kahl R, Wätjen W., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that in human hepatoma cells daidzein at a non-toxic concentration increases the activity of human catalase and induces the transcription of the catalase gene via interaction with the proximal part of the promoter.

Soy and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) activities

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Positive regulation of hepatic carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) activities by soy isoflavones and L-carnitine" by Shin ES, Cho SY, Lee EH, Lee SJ, Chang IS, Lee TR, posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Genistein and daidzein can up-regulate CPT1A enzyme activity through up-regulation of CPT1A transcription. Co-treatment of L-carnitine and genistein additively increases CPT1A enzyme activity in HepG2 cells. A stable Huh7 cell line transfected with the CPT1A promoter luciferase reporter gene was established and characterized.

Soy and Metastatic cancer progression

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Individual and combined soy isoflavones exert differential effects on metastatic cancer progression" by Martínez-Montemayor MM, Otero-Franqui E, Martinez J, De La Mota-Peynado A, Cubano LA, Dharmawardhane S., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that differential regulation of Rho GTPases, initiation factors, and survivin may account for the disparate responses of breast cancers to genistein and daidzein diets. This study indicates that consumption of soy foods may increase metastasis.

Soy and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Differential effects of whole soy extract and soy isoflavones on apoptosis in prostate cancer cells" by Hsu A, Bray TM, Helferich WG, Doerge DR, Ho E., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that the induction of apoptosis was independent of the NF kappaB pathway. Food products that bear a combination of active compounds may be more efficacious and safer as chemo-preventive agents than individual compounds. This 'whole-food'-based approach is significant for the development of public health recommendations for prostate cancer prevention.

Soy isoflavones and Prostate-specific antigen.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Combined inhibitory effects of soy isoflavones and curcumin on the production of prostate-specific antigen" by Ide H, Tokiwa S, Sakamaki K, Nishio K, Isotani S, Muto S, Hama T, Masuda H, Horie S. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that isoflavones and curcumin could modulate serum PSA levels. Curcumin presumably synergizes with isoflavones to suppress PSA production in prostate cells through the anti-androgen effects.

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Soy and Vasomotor symptoms

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy protein and isoflavone effects on vasomotor symptoms in peri- and postmenopausal women: the Soy Estrogen Alternative Study" by Burke GL, Legault C, Anthony M, Bland DR, Morgan TM, Naughton MJ, Leggett K, Washburn SA, Vitolins MZ., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that soy protein containing 42 or 58 mg of isoflavones is no more effective than isoflavone-extracted soy protein for improving the number and severity of vasomotor symptoms in peri- and postmenopausal women.

Soy phytoestrogens anf Hot flashes

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy extracts versus hormone therapy for reduction of menopausal hot flushes: indirect comparison" by Bolaños-Díaz R, Zavala-Gonzales JC, Mezones-Holguín E, Francia-Romero J., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that HT and soy interventions showed a significant difference in efficacy for the reduction of hot flushes in postmenopausal women when each treatment was compared with placebo. However, using indirect comparison, there is a statistically significant difference between HT and soy extracts in their effects on hot flushes.

Soy isoflavones as safe functional ingredients

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the study of "Soy isoflavones: are they useful in menopause?" by Vincent A, Fitzpatrick LA., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that soy isoflavones are biologically active compounds. Current data are insufficient to draw definitive conclusions regarding the use of isoflavones as an alternative to estrogen for hormone replacement in postmenopausal women. Although epidemiological and basic laboratory studies allude to the possible protective effects of soy isoflavones at specific target tissues.

Soy and Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Effects of phytoestrogens derived from soy bean on expression of adhesion molecules on HUVEC" by de Andrade CM, de S MF, Toloi MR., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Isoflavones extracted from Glycine max soy bean, in vitro, presented antiatherogenic effects, reducing the expression of adhesion molecules and acting as preventive agents as well as therapeutic agents.

Soy isoflavones and Myocardial fibrosis

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Puerarin prevents isoprenaline-induced myocardial fibrosis in mice by reduction of myocardial TGF-β1 expression" by Chen R, Xue J, Xie M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that that puerarin ( the main isoflavone isolated from the root of the wild leguminous creeper Pueraria lobata (Willd) Ohwi) could prevent isoprenaline-induced myocardial fibrosis in mice, and its mechanisms might be related to reduction of transforming growth factor-β1 expression via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ and subsequent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB in myocardial tissue.

Soy and Neurovascular research

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Phytoestrogens: implications in neurovascular research" by Lephart ED, Porter JP, Hedges DW, Lund TD, Setchell KD., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health found that health effects of estrogen, isoflavones and their hormonal mechanism of action, brain penetration by isoflavones, heath effects of isoflavones, and effects of isoflavones on vascular, neuroendocrine, and cognitive function. Because of their diverse health effects and widespread availability in soy foods, dietary phytoestrogens merit continued research into their effects on human health and cognitive function.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Soy isoflavone and Cerebral arteries.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Vasorelaxant and antioxidant activity of the isoflavone metabolite equol in carotid and cerebral arteries" by Jackman KA, Woodman OL, Chrissobolis S, Sobey CG.. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Equol possesses substantial vasodilator and weak antioxidant activity in cerebral arteries, with similar activity to daidzein, whereas in hypertension the vasorelaxant response to equol, but not daidzein, is preserved. However, daidzein possesses comparable direct vascular effects with equol, without the need for intestinal conversion to equol. Nevertheless, equol may represent a more useful therapeutic agent during cerebral vascular disease.

Soy isoflavones and Memory performance

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Memory performance of hypercholesterolemic mice in response to treatment with soy isoflavones" by Liu YQ, Xin TR, Lü XY, Ji Q, Jin Y, Yang HD., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that SI improve the memory performance of hypercholesterolemic mice, and the mechanism underlying the improvement might closely correlate with its roles in decreasing high blood lipid levels and modulating the metabolism of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and amino acids in brain areas of hypercholesterolemic mice.

Soy isoflavones and Alzheimer's disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the investigation of "Pre-treatment effect of different doses of soy isoflavones on spatial learning and memory in an ovariectomized animal model of Alzheimer's disease" by Sarkaki A, Amani R, Badavi M, Moghaddam AZ, Aligholi H, Safahani M, Haghighizadeh MH., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Soy meal diet (with or without isoflavone) in ovariectomized rats with Alzheimer's disease caused improvement of performance across 18 trials of Acquisition. Our results suggest that soy meal is a potential alternative to estrogen in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

Soy and Parkinson's disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Preventive effects of soy meal (+/- isoflavone) on spatial cognitive deficiency and body weight in an ovariectomized animal model of Parkinson's disease" by Sarkaki A, Badavi M, Aligholi H, Moghaddam AZ., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that long-duration dietary soy meal may have the potential neuroprotective effect against post-menopausal cognitive deficiency induced by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and constant body weight during post-menopausal life cycle.

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Soy and Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS)

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Genistein reduces glycosaminoglycan levels in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type II" by Friso A, Tomanin R, Salvalaio M, Scarpa M, posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Urinary GAG levels were reduced after 10 weeks' treatment with genistein at either 5 or 25 mg.kg(-1).day(-1). In tissue samples from liver, spleen, kidney and heart, a reduction in GAG content was observed with both dosages, after 10 weeks' treatment. Decreased GAG deposits in brain were observed after genistein treatment in some animals.

Soy protein and Soy protein diet increases skilled forelimb reaching function after stroke

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the study of "Soy protein diet increases skilled forelimb reaching function after stroke in rats" by Cheatwood JL, Burnet D, Butteiger DN, Banz WJ., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that rats receiving the soy protein-containing diet (SP) demonstrated less severe reaching deficits than rats fed the Na caseinate-containing diet (CAS) (p<0.05).

Soy and symptoms of Krabbe disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "A galactose-free diet enriched in soy isoflavones and antioxidants results in delayed onset of symptoms of Krabbe disease in twitcher mice" by Pannuzzo G, Cardile V, Costantino-Ceccarini E, Alvares E, Mazzone D, Perciavalle V., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that a time-dependent and concentration-dependent decrease of OLP-II viability on exposure to psychosine and dose-dependent protection with the antioxidants xanthophylls and glutathione.

Soy and neuropathic pain

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "The correlation between dietary soy phytoestrogens and neuropathic pain behavior in rats after partial denervation" by Shir Y, Campbell JN, Raja SN, Seltzer Z. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, indicated that this report is the first to show that, at certain plasma concentrations, phytoestrogens reduce neuropathic pain in rats. IMPLICATIONS: Dietary soy suppresses neuropathic pain in rats after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Some of the pain-suppression properties of soy can be attributed to phytoestrogens, isoflavones abundantly found in soy products

Soy and menstrual migraine

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Randomized, controlled trial of phytoestrogen in the prophylactic treatment of menstrual migraine" by Burke BE, Olson RD, Cusack BJ. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that forty-nine patients were randomized to receive either placebo, or a daily combination of 60 mg soy isoflavones, 100 mg dong quai, and 50 mg black cohosh, with each component standardized to its primary alkaloid. Patients received study medication for 24 weeks. Average frequency of menstrually associated migraine attacks during weeks 9-24 was reduced from 10.3 +/- 2.4 (mean +/- s.e.m.) in placebo treated patients to 4.7 +/- 1.8 (P < 0.01) in patients treated with the phytoestrogen preparation.

Soy and physicochemical properties

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Molecular design of seed storage proteins for enhanced food physicochemical properties" by Tandang-Silvas MR, Tecson-Mendoza EM, Mikami B, Utsumi S, Maruyama N., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Recombinant technology and protein engineering are two of the tools in biotechnology that have been used in producing soybean proteins with better gelling property, solubility, and emulsifying ability. This article reviews the molecular basis for the logical and precise protein designs that are important in obtaining the desired improved physicochemical properties.

Friday, December 2, 2011

Soy protein and body fat

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy protein isolate and its hydrolysate reduce body fat of dietary obese rats and genetically obese mice (yellow KK)" by Aoyama T, Fukui K, Takamatsu K, Hashimoto Y, Yamamoto T., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Body-fat content in mice fed SPI and SPI-H diets was significantly lower than in those fed the casein diet. In rats, plasma total cholesterol level was lower with the SPI-H diet, and plasma glucose level was lower with the SPI and SPI-H diets than with the casein diet. These results indicate that SPI and SPI-H are suitable protein sources in energy-restricted diets for the treatment of obesity.

Soy milk and the Adventist Health

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy milk and dairy consumption is independently associated with ultrasound attenuation of the heel bone among postmenopausal women: the Adventist Health Study-2" by Matthews VL, Knutsen SF, Beeson WL, Fraser GE., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that Among individual dairy products, only cheese showed an independent and significant protection (OR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.12-0.66; P(trend) = .004) for women eating cheese more than once per week vs those who ate cheese less than once a week. We concluded that osteoporosis is inversely associated with soy milk intake to a similar degree as dairy intake after accounting for age, body mass index, and estrogen use.

Soy and muscle protein synthesis

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion in young and elderly persons" by Phillips SM, Tang JE, Moore DR., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health found that that whey protein is better able to support MPS than is soy protein, a finding that may explain the greater ability of whey protein to support greater net muscle mass gains with resistance exercise. This review focuses on evidence showing the differences in responses of MPS, and ultimately muscle protein accretion, to consumption of milk- and soy-based supplemental protein sources in humans.

Soybean Casserole


By Everblest, Added March 08, 2004 | Recipe #86124, posted in Food.com (Sources)

Total Time: 1 hrs 50 mins

Prep Time: 1 hrs 5 mins

Cook Time: 45 mins

Servings: 8

Ingredients
  • 2 cups soybeans
  • 1 medium onion
  • 5 slices cooked and crumbled bacon
  • 8 ounces feta cheese
  • 1 1/2 cups cottage cheese
  • 1 egg
  • 1 bag frozen spinach

Directions:

  1. Soak soybeans overnight in at least six cups of water.
  2. Cook soybeans in new water until tender.
  3. 3
    Thaw spinach in a bowl in the microwave.
  4. 4
    Saute onion (You could add one green pepper if you like.) Mix soybeans, crumbled bacon bits, onions and spinach together and spread in a large casserole dish.
  5. In a separate bowl, mix crumbled feta cheese, cottage cheese, and one egg.
  6. Spread cheese mixture over soybeans.
  7. Bake in 350 degree F oven 45 minutes until topping is brown and casserole is heated through.
  8. Variations: Use fresh spinach or broccoli or frozen broccoli.
  9. Note: You may need two eggs for binding the cheese to soybeans if feta is particularly dry.
  10. Sometimes I dust the top with a bit of paprika for color not for taste.
  11. You can use more or less bacon.
  12. It is just a teaser to get them to try it.
  13. I've made it without the bacon for a vegetarian friend of mine and she loved it.

Mediterranean Style Soybean Gratin


Posted in wheat-free-meat-free.blogspot.com/ (Sources)

Ingredients
1 cup dried soybeans (makes 2 cups cooked beans)

1 Tbsp. olive oil

1 large onion, peeled and chopped (everything gets a medium chop)
1 large carrot, peeled and chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
3 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
1/2 green pepper, seeded and chopped
1 (14.5 oz.) can diced tomatoes

8-10 mushrooms, sliced

1 tsp. dried thyme
1 tsp. dried rosemary, crumbled
Salt and pepper to taste

1 Tbsp. butter
1 Tbsp. olive oil
1/4 cup brown rice flour
1 cup fresh bread crumbs (I used 2 slices Rudi's Gluten Free Wheat Bread)
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

Soak soybeans overnight in water to cover. Drain and place in a medium saucepan with fresh water to cover. Bring to a boil. Turn heat to simmer and cook, covered, until beans are tender, 45 minutes to an hour. Drain beans, but reserve bean liquid.

Heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil in frying pan. Add onions and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add in carrots, celery, garlic, and green pepper. Cook another 2-3 minutes, stirring. Add 1 cup reserved bean broth and simmer over low heat, until carrots are crisp-tender, about 5-7 minutes more.

Add tomatoes (and their juice)and simmer another 5 minutes. Then, using a slotted spoon, remove all the simmered vegetables to the bowl with the cooked soybeans and mix well. Pour pan juices into a large measuring cup and add in enough bean broth to measure 2 cups. Reserve.

Wipe frying pan with a cloth or paper towel to dry. Add sliced mushrooms to pan and saute over medium heat until browned, about 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently. Mix mushrooms in with beans and sauteed vegetables. Add thyme, rosemary and salt and pepper to taste.

Turn mixture into a 1-1/2 quart casserole dish.

Heat oven to 375 degrees F.

Heat butter and 1 Tbsp. olive oil in frying pan. Whisk in rice flour to make a roux. Slowly add in reserved pan juice/bean stock mixture, whisking constantly to keep lumps from forming. Add salt and pepper to taste. Simmer, stirring, until sauce thickens, about 4-5 minutes. Pour sauce over vegetables in casserole dish.

Blend bread crumbs and Parmesan. Sprinkle over bean casserole. Drizzle a little extra olive oil over the top and then pop in the oven and bake for 45 minutes, or until bubbly and crumb topping is lightly browned and CRISPY.

Garnish with chopped parsley.

Serves 6.

Tangy Tomatoey Soybeans

By Ann, Added January 17, 2002 | Recipe #17269, posted in Food.com (Sources)

Total Time: 45 mins

Prep Time: 5 mins

Cook Time: 40 mins

Ingredients
  • 125 g soybeans, soaked overnight
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 3/4 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon red chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon garam masala powder (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves, chopped
  • salt

Directions:

  1. Bring a pot of water (2 cups) to a boil, lower flame, add salt to taste (around 1/4 tsp), and cook the pre-soaked soy beans for about 30 minutes, or until cooked.
  2. Drain.
  3. While the beans are cooking, heat oil in a saucepan on a medium-high flame and add the mustard seeds.
  4. When they start sputtering, add the chopped onions and sauté until they turn brown.
  5. Now add the tomato paste, red chili powder, garam masala powder, and sauté for about 5 minutes.
  6. Add the cooked soy beans to the saucepan, mix well and sauté for another 5 minutes.
  7. Remove from flame, garnish with chopped cilantro and serve hot!