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Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Interaction effects between genes involved in the AKT signaling pathway and phytoestrogens in gastric carcinogenesis

Posted by Chantel Martiromo. research contributed by PubMed

In the study to investigate whether genes involved in AKT/nuclear factor kappa B signaling and/or gene-environment interactions between the genes and phytoestrogens may be susceptible factors for gastric cancer posted in PubMed, indicated that CDK1 and FAS genes involved in AKT signaling and influenced by anti-carcinogenic property of phytoestrogens can play a role as susceptible genetic factors in gastric carcinogenesis. FAS and MAP3K1 genes significantly interact with enterolactone, thereby modifying the individual's risk for gastric cancer.

Chinese Secrets to Fatty Liver and Obesity Reversal
A fabulous E book with Research based & Scientifically proven Efficacy To Treat Fatty Liver Diseases & Achieve Optimal Health & Loose Weight
 
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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Emodin and Aloe-Emodin Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

Posted by Chantel Martiromo. research contributed by PubMed

The anthraquinones emodin and aloe-emodin are abundant in rhubarb. Several lines of evidence indicate that emodin and aloe-emodin have estrogenic activity as phytoestrogens. In the study to investigate the effects and molecular mechanisms of emodin and aloe-emodin on breast cancer cell proliferation, posted in PubMed, showed that both emodin and aloe-emodin are capable of inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation by downregulating ER α protein levels, thereby suppressing ER α transcriptional activation. Furthermore, aloe-emodin treatment led to the dissociation of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and ER α and increased ER α ubiquitination. Although emodin had similar effects to aloe-emodin, it was not capable of promoting HSP90/ER α dissociation and ER α ubiquitination. Protein fractionation results suggest that aloe-emodin tended to induce cytosolic ER α degradation. Although emodin might induce cytosolic ER α degradation, it primarily affected nuclear ER α distribution similar to the action of estrogen when protein degradation was blocked. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that emodin and aloe-emodin specifically suppress breast cancer cell proliferation by targeting ER α protein stability through distinct mechanisms. These findings suggest a possible application of anthraquinones in preventing or treating breast cancer in the future.

Chinese Secrets to Fatty Liver and Obesity Reversal
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Sunday, July 28, 2013

Phytoestrogens selective for the estrogen receptor beta exert anti-androgenic effects in castration resistant prostate cancer

Posted by Chantel Martiromo. research contributed by PubMed

Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men of the Western world. A castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) eventually will arise when a local restricted prostate carcinoma was not cured duly by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. According to the study by the Hormone and Obesity Center Bahnhofsalle, posted in PubMed, phytoestrogens feature tumour preventive characteristics and most probably are involved in the low incidence rate of hormone related cancers in Asian countries. Phytoestrogens such as isoflavones can have a marked impact on the most essential therapy target of CRPC i.e. the androgen receptor. Furthermore, functional analyses solidified the notion of such drugs as androgen antagonistic. Phytoestrogens commonly feature low toxicity combined with a potential of targeted therapy. Thus, these drugs qualify for conceivable implementation in prostate cancer patients under active surveillance. In addition, relapse prevention with these drugs after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy might be considered.

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Saturday, July 27, 2013

Synaptodendritic recovery following HIV-1 Tat exposure: Neurorestoration by phytoestrogens

Posted by Chantel Martiromo. research contributed by PubMed
 
In the study to examine the integrity of the dendritic network after exposure to HIV-1 Tat by labeling filamentous actin (F-actin)-rich structures (puncta) in primary neuronal cultures, posted in PubMed, showed that after 24 hours of treatment, HIV-1 Tat was associated with the dendritic arbor and produced a significant reduction of F-actin-labeled dendritic puncta as well as loss of dendrites. Pretreatment with either of two plant-derived phytoestrogen compounds (daidzein and liquiritigenin), significantly reduced synaptodendritic damage following HIV-1 Tat treatment. Additionally, 6 days after HIV-1 Tat treatment, treatment with either daidzein or liquiritigenin enhanced recovery, via the estrogen receptor, from HIV-1 Tat-induced synaptodendritic damage. These results suggest that either liquiritigenin or daidzein may not only attenuate acute synaptodendritic injury in HIV-1, but also promote recovery from synaptodendritic damage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Friday, July 26, 2013

Phytoestrogens and breast cancer

Posted by Chantel Martiromo. research contributed by PubMed

Genistein is an isoflavone with oestrogenic activity that is present in a variety of soy products as a constituent of complex mixtures of bioactive compounds, whose matrix profiles play an important role in determining the overall oestrogenic bioactivity of genistein.  In the research focused on the effects of dietary genistein on the growth of oestrogen (E)-dependent mammary tumours both in vitro and in vivo, posted in PubMed, indicated that Genistein enhances the proliferation of E-dependent human breast cancer tumour growth. In a similar manner, dietary genistein stimulates tumour growth in the chemically-induced (NMU) mammary cancer rodent model. Genistin, the glycoside of genistein, simulates growth similar to that of genistein and withdrawal of either genistein or genistin results in tumour regression. The extent of soy processing modulates the effects of dietary genistein in vivo as soy protein isolate, a highly purified and widely used source of protein that is processed to contain low, medium, and high amounts of isoflavones, stimulate the growth of the E-dependent mammary tumours in a dose dependent manner. In contrast to the more purified diets, studies with soy flour of equivalent genistein levels did not stimulate the growth of E-dependent breast cancer tumours in vivo.

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