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".....Utilizing Traditional Chinese Medicine in Tonifying Energy flow to the Reproductive System Channels In Men and Women for Natural Conception, including Couple Who were diagnosed with Unexplained causes of Infertility...." Chantel M.

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Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Soy-derived isoflavonoid and Skin aging

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Biochemical investigation and gene analysis of equol: A plant and soy-derived isoflavonoid with antiaging and antioxidant properties with potential human skin applications" by Gopaul R, Knaggs HE, Lephart ED., posted in posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, showed that equol significantly increased collagen, elastin (ELN), and tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease and decreased metalloproteinases (MMPs) gene expression and caused significant positive changes in skin antioxidant and antiaging genes. In hMFC, equol significantly increased collagen type I (COL1A1), whereas, 5α-DHT significantly decreased cell viability that was blocked by equol. FACS analysis showed equol and 17β-estradiol significantly stimulated COL1A1, collagen type III (COL3A1), and ELN while MMPs were significantly decreased compared with control values.

Sunday, January 29, 2012

After Work Bean Soup

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by thumboilseed.com (source)

Ingredients:
1 tsp Soy Beginnings Oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 can (15 oz) soybeans
1 can (15 oz) kidney beans
1 can (15 oz) garbanzo beans
1/2 tsp oregano
2 cups water 1/2 tsp pepper
1 can (15 oz) tomatoes
1 can (15 oz) stewed tomatoes
1 cup frozen mixed vegetables

Directions:
Heat the Soy Beginnings Oil in a soup pot or Dutch oven and sauté the onion and garlic in it over medium heat.
Rinse and drain the beans, then add them to the pot along with the water.
Chop the tomatoes and stewed tomatoes (or purée them in a blender) and add them with their liquid to the soup pot. Add the vegetables, oregano and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer about 10 minutes. Serve!

Yield: 10 servings
Serving size: 1 cup
Per serving: 190 calories, 6 g total fat (0.8 g sat fat), 13 g pro, 28 g carb, 8.1 g fiber, 542 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol
Exchanges: 1 - 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable, 1 medium-fat meat

Spicy Sweet Soy Nuts

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by thumboilseed.com (source)

Ingredients:
3 Tbs sugar
1-1/2 Tbs water
1/4 tsp 5-spice powder*
1/8 tsp ground black pepper
1 cup Roasted Soy Nuts

Directions:
In a 1-quart microwave-safe dish, stir together the sugar and water. Microwave on full power for 3 minutes, stirring halfway through, until mixture is foamy and getting thick.
Add in the 5-spice powder, black pepper and soy nuts. Stir quickly to coat the nuts evenly. Be careful the sugar mixture will be hot.
Microwave for 1 minute 15 seconds more. Spread the nuts onto a nonstick or lightly greased baking sheet to cool. If they stick together, press lightly to break apart.

*Chinese 5-spice powder is available in Chinese markets and many grocery stores. You can substitute allspice if you like.

Yield: 1 cup nuts (8 servings)
Serving size: 2 Tbs
Per serving: 78 calories, 3 g total fat (0.4 g sat fat), 5 g pro, 9 g carb, 1.2 g fiber, 1 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol
Exchanges: 1/2 other carbohydrate, 1 lean meat

Summer Soy Smoothie

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by thumboilseed.com (source)

This refreshing treat is one of the easiest and most delicious ways to introduce soy protein into your diet. It's also a perfect example of how using soy powder and Soy Milk lets you turn many standard recipes into soy sources.

Ingredients:
2 cups fresh strawberries
¾ cup nonfat milk
1 tablespoon honey
2 scoops soy protein powder (plain or flavored)

Directions:
Simply combine ingredients in a blender, cover and blend at high speed until smooth and frothy.

Yield: 2 Servings
Nutritional information per serving: 190 calories, 1 gram fat, 133 milligrams sodium

Soy Milk Bread

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by thumboilseed.com (source)

This could easily become your daily bread. For a change of pace, try kneading herbs, nuts or dried fruit into the dough, or shaping it into small loaves, rolls or free-form rounds.

Ingredients:
2-1/2 cups Soy Milk
2 Tbs honey
1/4 cup Soy Oil
1 Tbs active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1/3 cup Soy Flour
2 cups white bread flour
5 or more cups whole wheat flour
2-1/2 tsp salt

Directions:
Bring Soy Milk and honey almost to a boil. Remove from heat, stir in oil, and let cool to lukewarm.
Dissolve yeast in warm water and let sit about 5 minutes, until bubbles begin to form.
Combine soy flour, white flour, 4 cups of the whole wheat flour and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add the yeast and Soy Milk mixtures and stir well. Add the remaining whole wheat flour as needed to make a soft dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured board and knead until smooth and elastic, about 10 to 15 minutes.
Put dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover and let rise until double in bulk, about 2 hours. Punch down, shape into two loaves and let rise again in lightly oiled bread pans until dough reaches the top of the pan, about 45 minutes. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes at 350°, until golden and bottom sounds hollow when tapped. Remove from pans to cool.

Yield: 2 loaves (16 slices each)
Serving size: 1 slice
Per serving: 129 calories, 3 g total fat (0.4 g sat fat), 5 g pro, 23 g carb, 2.7 g fiber, 176 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol
Exchanges: 1-1/2 starch

Fiesta Soy Trail Mix

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by thumboilseed.com (source)


Ingredients:
1 cup roasted salted soy bean halves
1 cup cheddar flavor Goldfish
1 1/2 cup salted tiny pretzels
1 cup multi bran Chex cereal
1 tbs. dry Ranch dressing mix

Directions:
Toss ingredients together in a plastic bag.

Isoflavone-free soy diet and ovarian hormones in premenopausal women

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the investigation of "Effects of an isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women" by Lu LJ, Anderson KE, Grady JJ, Nagamani M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that our results are consistent with previous studies showing decreased ovarian hormone levels and decreased risk of breast cancer in populations consuming soya diets and an inverse relationship between animal protein intake and breast cancer risk and, therefore, may have implications for breast cancer prevention.

Hormonal effects of soy and premenopausal women and men

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Hormonal effects of soy in premenopausal women and men" by
Kurzer MS., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that
the studies in women have provided modest support for beneficial effects. One cross-sectional study showed serum estrogens to be inversely associated with soy intake. Seven soy intervention studies controlled for phase of menstrual cycle. These studies provided 32-200 mg/d of isoflavones and generally showed decreased midcycle plasma gonadotropins and trends toward increased menstrual cycle length and decreased blood concentrations of estradiol, progesterone and sex hormone-binding globulin. A few studies also showed decreased urinary estrogens and increased ratios of urinary 2-(OH) to 16alpha-(OH) and 2-(OH) to 4-(OH) estrogens. Soy and isoflavone consumption does not seem to affect the endometrium in premenopausal women, although there have been weak estrogenic effects reported in the breast.

Isoflavone-rich soy protein and androgen receptor

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate suppresses androgen receptor expression without altering estrogen receptor-beta expression or serum hormonal profiles in men at high risk of prostate cancer" by Hamilton-Reeves JM, Rebello SA, Thomas W, Slaton JW, Kurzer MS. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that At 6 mo, consumption of SPI+ significantly suppressed AR expression but did not alter estrogen receptor-beta expression or circulating hormones. Consumption of SPI- significantly increased estradiol and androstenedione concentrations, and tended to suppress AR expression (P = 0.09). Although the effects of SPI- consumption on estradiol and androstenedione are difficult to interpret and the clinical relevance is uncertain, these data show that AR expression in the prostate is suppressed by soy protein isolate consumption, which may be beneficial in preventing prostate cancer.

Soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Clinical studies show no effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men: results of a meta-analysis" by Hamilton-Reeves JM, Vazquez G, Duval SJ, Phipps WR, Kurzer MS, Messina MJ, posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that No significant effects of soy protein or isoflavone intake on T, SHBG, free T, or FAI were detected regardless of statistical model and concluded that the results of this meta-analysis suggest that neither soy foods nor isoflavone supplements alter measures of bioavailable T concentrations in men.

Soybean isoflavone and feminizing effects in Men

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soybean isoflavone exposure does not have feminizing effects on men: a critical examination of the clinical evidence" by Messina M., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that In contrast to the results of some rodent studies, findings from a recently published metaanalysis and subsequently published studies show that neither isoflavone supplements nor isoflavone-rich soy affect total or free testosterone (T) levels. Similarly, there is essentially no evidence from the nine identified clinical studies that isoflavone exposure affects circulating estrogen levels in men. Clinical evidence also indicates that isoflavones have no effect on sperm or semen parameters, although only three intervention studies were identified and none were longer than 3 months in duration. Finally, findings from animal studies suggesting that isoflavones increase the risk of erectile dysfunction are not applicable to men, because of differences in isoflavone metabolism between rodents and humans and the excessively high amount of isoflavones to which the animals were exposed.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Soy protein and hormones in pre- and post-menopausal women

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Effects of soy protein and isoflavones on circulating hormone concentrations in pre- and post-menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis" by Hooper L, Ryder JJ, Kurzer MS, Lampe JW, Messina MJ, Phipps WR, Cassidy A., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, found that In premenopausal women, meta-analysis suggested that soy or isoflavone consumption did not affect primary outcomes estradiol, estrone or SHBG concentrations, but significantly reduced secondary outcomes FSH and LH [by approximately 20% using standardized mean difference (SMD), P = 0.01 and 0.05, respectively]. Menstrual cycle length was increased by 1.05 days (95% CI 0.13, 1.97, 10 studies). In post-menopausal women, there were no statistically significant effects on estradiol, estrone, SHBG, FSH or LH, although there was a small statistically non-significant increase in total estradiol with soy or isoflavones ( approximately 14%, SMD, P = 0.07, 21 studies). CONCLUSIONS Isoflavone-rich soy products decrease FSH and LH in premenopausal women and may increase estradiol in post-menopausal women.