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Saturday, November 19, 2011

Soy and Vascular Effects

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Vascular Effects of Phytoestrogens and Alternative Menopausal Hormone Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease" by Gencel VB, Benjamin MM, Bahou SN, Khalil RA., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that the WHO-CARDIAC study supported that consumption of high soybean diet is associated with lower mortalities from coronary artery disease. However, as with estrogen, there has been some discrepancy between the experimental studies demonstrating the vascular benefits of phytoestrogens and the data from clinical trials. This is likely because the phytoestrogens clinical trials have been limited in many aspects including the number of participants enrolled, the clinical end points investigated, and the lack of long-term follow-up. Further investigation of the cellular mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of phytoestrogens and careful evaluation of the epidemiological evidence and clinical trials of their potential vascular benefits would put forward the use of phytoestrogens as an alternative MHT for the relief of menopausal symptoms and amelioration of postmenopausal CVD.

Soy isoflavones and lung cancer

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Soy isoflavones radiosensitize lung cancer while mitigating normal tissue injury" by Hillman GG, Singh-Gupta V, Runyan L, Yunker CK, Rakowski JT, Sarkar FH, Miller S, Gadgeel SM, Sethi S, Joiner MC, Konski AA.,posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Soy isoflavones augment destruction of A549 lung tumor nodules by radiation, and also mitigate vascular damage, inflammation and fibrosis caused by radiation injury to normal lung tissue. Soy could be used as a non-toxic complementary approach to improve RT in NSCLC.

soy isoflavones and curcumin and Prostate-specific antigen.

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Combined inhibitory effects of soy isoflavones and curcumin on the production of prostate-specific antigen" by Ide H, Tokiwa S, Sakamaki K, Nishio K, Isotani S, Muto S, Hama T, Masuda H, Horie S., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that the production of prostate-specific antigen(PSA) were markedly decreased by the combined treatment of isoflavones and curcumin in prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP. The expression of the androgen receptor was also suppressed by the treatment. In clinical trials, PSA levels decreased in the patients group with PSA >or= 10 treated with supplement containing isoflavones and curcumin (P = 0.01) and concluded that isoflavones and curcumin could modulate serum PSA levels. Curcumin presumably synergizes with isoflavones to suppress PSA production in prostate cells through the anti-androgen effects.

soy isoflavones and Ovarian estrogen receptor-α

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "[Effects of soy isoflavones and major active component genistein on the expression of ovarian estrogen receptor-α in rats].[Article in Chinese]" by Zhang YH, Pang HY, Xiao XH, Wen HX, Ni J., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Soy isoflavones can up-regulate the expressions of ER-α mRNA and protein in senile rat ovaries. As a major active component of soy isoflavones, genistein can regulate the expressions ER-α mRNA in granulosa cells of rat ovaries. Such an effect is concentration-dependent. And 1-10 µmol/L genistein may up-regulate the expression of ER-α mRNA.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Soy and Macrophage Phagocytosis and Lymphocyte

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


According to the study of "Soy lecithin supplementation alters macrophage phagocytosis and lymphocyte response to concanavalin A: a study in alloxan-induced diabetic rats" by Miranda DT, Batista VG, Grando FC, Paula FM, Felício CA, Rubbo GF, Fernandes LC, Curi R, Nishiyama A., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Soy lecithin supplementation significantly increased both macrophage phagocytic capacity (+29%) in non-diabetic rats and the lymphocyte number in diabetic rats (+92%). It is unlikely that plasma lipid levels indirectly affect immune cells, since plasma cholesterol, TAG, or phospholipid content was not modified by lecithin supplementation. In conclusion, lymphocyte and macrophage function were altered by lecithin supplementation, indicating an immunomodulatory effect of phosphatidylcholine.

Soy and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the study of 'Antiatherogenic and antiperoxidative effects of garlic and soy proteins in alcohol fed rats" by Rajasree CR, Rajmohan T, Augusti KT., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that GP(garlic proteins) feeding showed a better effect than SP(soy proteins) in lowering serum and heart total cholesterol, and in maintaining GPx( glutathione peroxidase) at near normal level, while SP feeding showed a better effect in lowering serum FFA(free fatty acid) level and maintaining GR(glutathione reductase) activity at near normal level. In suppressing incorporation of labeled acetate into serum cholesterol, GP feeding showed a better effect than SP. Antiatherogenic and antiperoxidative effects of these proteins may be due to lower lysine/arginine ratio.

Soy lecithin and Maintenance of sperm

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Soy lecithin replaces egg yolk for cryopreservation of human sperm without adversely affecting postthaw motility, morphology, sperm DNA integrity, or sperm binding to hyaluronate' by Reed ML, Ezeh PC, Hamic A, Thompson DJ, Caperton CL., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that Soy lecithi enhances [1] recovery of motile sperm, [2] maintenance of sperm cell morphology, [3] maintenance of the ability of sperm to bind to hyaluronate in vitro, or [4] maintenance of sperm DNA integrity.

Soy and Administration on hypercholesterolemia

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the study of "Influence of soy lecithin administration on hypercholesterolemia" by Mourad AM, de Carvalho Pincinato E, Mazzola PG, Sabha M, Moriel P. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that a significant reduction in total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations was observed during the first month of treatment, suggesting that the administration of soy lecithin daily may be used as a supplemental treatment in hypercholesterolemia.

Soy and Mental Stress

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Effects of soy lecithin phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine complex (PAS) on the endocrine and psychological responses to mental stress" by Hellhammer J, Fries E, Buss C, Engert V, Tuch A, Rutenberg D, Hellhammer D., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that PAS seemed to exert a specific positive effect on emotional responses to the (Trier Social Stress Test)TSST. While the placebo group showed the expected increase in distress after the test, the group treated with 400 mg PAS showed decreased distress.

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Soy Protein and Aortic cholesteryl ester content

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


According to the study of "Dietary soy protein and estrogen replacement therapy improve cardiovascular risk factors and decrease aortic cholesteryl ester content in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys" by Wagner JD, Cefalu WT, Anthony MS, Litwak KN, Zhang L, Clarkson TB., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that that both Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) and dietary soybean protein have beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. Interestingly, the two treatments affected different risk factors and together resulted in the greatest reduction in arterial cholesterol content.

Soy protein versus soy phytoestrogens

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the study of "Soy protein versus soy phytoestrogens in the prevention of diet-induced coronary artery atherosclerosis of male cynomolgus monkeys" by Anthony MS, Clarkson TB, Bullock BC, Wagner JD., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health,resreachers found that The beneficial effects of soy protein on atherosclerosis appear to be mediated primarily by the phytoestrogen component. Testicular weights were unaffected by the phytoestrogens.

Soy and body weight and glycemic control

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


In the study of "Effects of soy vs. casein protein on body weight and glycemic control in female monkeys and their offspring" by Wagner JD, Jorgensen MJ, Cline JM, Lees CJ, Franke AA, Zhang L, Ayers MR, Schultz C, Kaplan JR., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Glucose tolerance tests in adult females were not significantly different with diet, but offspring eating TAD soy had increased glucose disappearance with overall lower glucose and insulin responses to the glucose challenge compared with typical American diet (TAD) casein.

Soy and Anti-Epigenetic changes

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to tghe sstudy of "Epigenetic changes with dietary soy in cynomolgus monkeys" by Howard TD, Ho SM, Zhang L, Chen J, Cui W, Slager R, Gray S, Hawkins GA, Medvedovic M, Wagner JD., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that eating two high-fat, typical American diets (TAD) with similar macronutrient contents, with or without soy protein. DNA methylation status was successfully determined for 80.6% of the probes in at least one tissue using Illumina's HumanMethylation27 BeadChip and concluded that the use of the HumanMethylation27 BeadChip in cynomolgus monkeys and identify epigenetic changes associated with dietary interventions with soy protein that may potentially affect the etiology of complex diseases.

Friday, November 4, 2011

Soy and endothelial function and blood pressure

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of `Dietary soy isoflavone induced increases in antioxidant and eNOS gene expression lead to improved endothelial function and reduced blood pressure in vivo`by Mahn K, Borrás C, Knock GA, Taylor P, Khan IY, Sugden D, Poston L, Ward JP, Sharpe RM, Viña J, Aaronson PI, Mann GE. posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health,
researchers found that an SP diet increases eNOS and antioxidant gene expression in the vasculature and other tissues, resulting in reduced oxidative stress and increased NO bioavailability. The improvement in endothelial function, increased gene expression, and reduced blood pressure by soy isoflavones have implications for alternative therapy for postmenopausal women and patients at risk of coronary heart disease.

Soy isoflavone and Sanfilippo Disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

In the stdy of `Two-year follow-up of Sanfilippo Disease patients treated with a genistein-rich isoflavone extract: assessment of effects on cognitive functions and general status of patients` by Piotrowska E, Jakobkiewicz-Banecka J, Maryniak A, Tylki-Szymanska A, Puk E, Liberek A, Wegrzyn A, Czartoryska B, Slominska-Wojewodzka M, Wegrzyn G., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that the treatment of Sanfilippo patients with a genistein-rich soy isoflavone extract (called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy [GET IT]) may be effective in either inhibition (in some patients) or slowing down (in other patients) of behavioral and cognitive problems over a longer period. An increased dose of genistein may improve the efficacy of the treatment.

Soy and renal cell carcinoma tumors and metastatic disease

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of `Monitoring sunitinib-induced vascular effects to optimize radiotherapy combined with soy isoflavones in murine xenograft tumor`by Hillman GG, Singh-Gupta V, Al-Bashir AK, Yunker CK, Joiner MC, Sarkar FH, Abrams J, Haacke EM., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that that soy could protect the vasculature of normal tissue from the adverse effects of sunitinib. An antiangiogenic approach that only partially destroys inefficient vessels could potentially increase the efficacy and delivery of cytotoxic therapies and radiotherapy for unresectable primary renal cell carcinoma tumors and metastatic disease.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Grilled Soy-Sesame Asparagus


By: Sue Lau, posted in All recipes.com (Source)
Prep Time:
10 Min
Cook Time:
8 Min
Ready In:
18 Min
Serving:4

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 pounds fresh asparagus, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

Directions

  1. Preheat grill for high heat.
  2. In a bowl, mix sesame oil, soy sauce, garlic, and brown sugar. Place asparagus in the bowl, and toss to coat.
  3. Lightly oil a fine-mesh grill grate. Place asparagus on grate, and cook 8 minutes, until tender but firm. Garnish with sesame seeds to serve.

Mushrooms with a Soy Sauce Glaze


Recipe By: STEVEANDANGELA . posted in All recipes (Source)


Prep Time: 5 Min
Cook Time: 10 Min
Ready In: 15 Min
Serving: 2

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 (8 ounce) package sliced white mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • ground black pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Melt the butter in skillet over medium heat; add the mushrooms; cook and stir until the mushrooms have softened and released their liquid, about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic; continue to cook and stir for 1 minute. Pour in the soy sauce; cook the mushrooms in the soy sauce until the liquid has evaporated, about 4 minutes.

Soy, the second generation soy foods

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health


According to the study of "Nutritional aspects of second generation soy foods" by Alezandro MR, Granato D, Lajolo FM, Genovese MI." , posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers found that the soy-based foods do not present a significant content of isoflavones when compared with the grain, and their in vitro antioxidant capacity is not related with these compounds but rather to the presence of other phenolics and synthetic antioxidants, such as sodium erythorbate. However, they may represent alternative sources and provide soy protein, isoflavones, and vegetable fat for those who are not ready to eat traditional soy foods.

Soy and Inflammatory disorders

Posted by Chantel M. Contributed by US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

According to the study of "Anti-inflammatory effects of glyceollins derived from soybean by elicitation with Aspergillus sojae" by Kim HJ, Sung MK, Kim JS., posted in US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, researchers indicated that Glyceollins exert an anti-inflammatory effect, which is mediated through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in LPS-activated murine RAW264.7 cells. Glyceollins merit further study as potential therapeutic agents for inflammatory disorders.