Get Pregnant Naturally

Get Pregnant Naturally
".....Utilizing Traditional Chinese Medicine in Tonifying Energy flow to the Reproductive System Channels In Men and Women for Natural Conception, including Couple Who were diagnosed with Unexplained causes of Infertility...." Chantel M.

Permanent Unwanted Tattoo Removal by Tattoo Expert

Permanent Unwanted Tattoo Removal by Tattoo Expert
Safely, Painlessly, Laserlessly and Naturally in Removing any Unwanted Tattoos in 2 to 8 Weeks, Guaranteed

Sunday, October 18, 2015

Women Health: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): The Holistic research, clinical trials and studies for Prevention, management and treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Post by Chantel Martiromo, Research and E Book provided by Kyle J. Norton

Biography
Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it's news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada - Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.

Premenstrual syndrome is defined as faulty function of the ovaries related to the women's menstrual cycle, effected over 70% to 90% of women in the US and lesser for women in Southeast Asia because of difference in living style and social structure. The syndrome also interferes women's physical and emotional states, and daily activities as a result of hormone fluctuation and occurs one to two weeks before menstruation and then declines when the period starts.

            Types of premenstrual syndrome

1. Anxiety
Anxiety is a common symptoms for women with PMS, caused by hormone imbalance between estrogen and progesterone(1). Most women with PMS is found to very high levels of estrogen and low levels of progesterone(4) before menstruation. Withdrawal from chronic exposure to the female sex steroid progesterone (P) may also contribute to the occurrence of PMS anxiety(2).

2. Craving
Some women with PMS may experience the symptom of food craving, caused by abnormal liver function in carbohydrate synthesis due to dietary habits(6) and abnormal levels of serotonin(10) cause of food intake, leading to carbohydrate craving(8). Other theory suggest when a woman under stress before period, she may grasp for everything which makes her feel more comfortable(7).

3. Hyperhydration(11)
Breast tenderness and water retention(12) are always a problem for some women with PMS. Breast tenderness is caused by over production of prolactin of abnormal function of pituitary gland(13). Water retention is either caused by over production of prolactin induced of renal sodium and potassium excretion(16) or abnormal function of lymphatic function(14)(15).

4. Depression
Researchers found that women with symptom of depression always have unbalance levels of estrogen(3) and progesterone as resulting of liver abnormal function of fat and protein metabolism(5). This unbalance induced nervous tension resulting in increasing nervous disorder including depression(3).

                                                           Diagnosis

Premenstrual syndrome may be similar to other types of symptoms such as candida, diabetic reaction, allergic intolerance, thyroid function. As of today, no test can diagnose PMS, due to confusion over exact signs and symptoms, the only method is to photocopy and fill in the menstrual symptom diary(2). If there are increasing symptoms in the two weeks before menstruation then it may be premenstrual syndrome(17)(18).


                                 Risk factors

Women in the below categories will be more likely to develop premenstrual syndrome.
1. Genetics and family history
If any one in your family have it, you may have it(20), although there is no proof about it. According to University of British Columbia, the prevalence ofpremenstrual syndrome was 43.0% and 46.8% in monozygotic and dizygotic twins, respectively found in genetic modeling(19).

2. Age
Fertile women are associated to increase risk of 86% in moderate to severe of PMS symptoms(21) compared to 95% of perimenopausal women(22).

3. Emotional and severe childhood physical abuse
Early childhood motional and severe childhood physical abuse are associated to risk of PMS in 2.6 and 2.1 time higher in comparison to those with no abuse(23).

4. Smoking
Smoking, especially in adolescence and young adulthood, may increase riskof moderate to severe PMS, according to University of Massachusetts(24).

5. Alcohol
Although alcohol drinking is not associated to risk of the syndrome, risk of premenstrual syndrome increased for early age at first use and long-term(25).

6. Early maternal age, and having more than three children
If you have children in early age or more than 3 children, your risk of premenstrual syndrome increases significantly(26).

7. Supplements intake
High intake of potassium was associated to a relative risk of 1.46 time higher compared to women in the lowest quintile. High intake of zinc supplements was marginally associated with PMS, according to University of Massachusetts(27).

8. Total fluid consumption a day
The prevalence of premenstrual syndrome increased if you consume more than 13-19 cups of fluid per day(28).

9. Caffeine
Consumption of caffeine-containing beverages, such as coffee and tea are associated to risk of premenstrual syndrome only to those drinking 7 to 10 cups per day(29).

10. Pregnancy succession
Your risk of PMS increases if you have experienced many pregnancies in quickly succession, but we can not find any study for supporting this risk factor.

11. High sugar and sweet intake
The prevalence of the premenstrual syndrome is higher in women with high intake of sugar and taste sweet(30).

12. Abnormal Hormone upheaval
If you have experienced a hormone upheaval caused by miscarriage(31), pregnancy, or pregnancy termination(32), you are at a high risk of developing PMS. Logically, it can happen, but we do not find any study to support this theory.

                                     The Symptoms

1. Emotional symptoms
a) Unhealthy diet(38)
Since we all know that our diet contains high amount of saturated and trans fat, unbalance of levels of essential fatty acids causes inability of liver in secreting bile into the digestive system and in fat and protein metabolism(39) that causes nervous tension resulting in increasing the emotional symptoms of PMS such as depression, anger, and fatigue(33), poorer sleep quality(34) stress(37), anxiety(35), irritability, aggression, tension, anxiety, depression, lethargy, insomnia, poor coordination and concentration, etc.(36).

b) Vitamins and minerals deficiency
It is unknown why women with PMS are found to have low levels of vitamin B6 and magnesium(40)(44). These may be caused by low levels of stomach acid or inability of digestive system in absorbing vital nutrients before period resulting in increasing nervous tension(42) and emotional and physical symptoms.

c) Hormone imbalance
Researchers found that women with PMS always have unbalance of levels of estrogen and progesterone before menstruation. It may be caused abnormal function of some glands in the body including the pituitary(14), thyroid gland(43). Over or under production of certain hormones such as serotonin, estrogen, progesterone, prolactin, adrenaline increases the nervous disorder resulting in symptoms of PMS.

d) Thyroid gland(42)
Women with PMS are found to have low thyroid function(44) resulting in increasing the risk of depression, stress, fatigue, tiredness, insomnia, etc.(45).

2. Physical symptoms
a) Foods and sugar craving
Strong liver is important for women with PMS. Unfortunately, most women with PMS are found to have sluggish liver function before menstruation caused by abnormal function of liver in carbohydrate synthesis and insulin regulating(46) resulting in foods and sugar craving(47).

b) Breast tenderness and water retention(48)
For what ever reasons, researchers show that some women with PMS are found to have high levels of prolactin and low levels of potassium as resulting in abnormal function of pituitary gland(49) and lymphatic function(50)(51) resulting in breast tenderness and water retention accordingly.

c) Palpitation(52)
Some women with PMS might experience heart palpitation(53), it is caused by malfunction of thyroid gland(54) and unbalance of estrogen and progesterone(55).

d) Menstrual cramps
Some women may experience menstrual cramps(56) which will disappear as soon as period start. It may be caused by irregular function of ovaries in hormones secretion or essential fatty acids deficiency(57) resulting in balancing levels of estrogen and progesterone and over production of certain hormone in the prostaglandins family(58).

                          The Complications

Premenstrual Syndrome(PMS) induces Insomnia
Premenstrual syndrome may induce insomnia due to
1. Mineral deficiency
Calcium(269), magnesium(271) are essential for women during menstrual cycle because they have a calming effects for the nervous system(272). Imbalance or deficiency of calcium, magnesium and increase the tension of the brain's cells, causing psychological complaints, including insomnia(273).

2. Vitamin B6 deficiency
Women with PMS are found to have low levels of vitamin B6(274) which is vital to convert tytrophan(275)(276) to serotonin(277). Deficiency of vitamin B6 interferes the production of serotonin(278), causing reduced the production of melatonin, a vital hormone in promoting a good nigh sleep(279)(280).

3. Alcohol
Alcohol abuse not only damages the liver(281), but also increases the tension of nervous system(282)(283) induced sleep disturbance(284)(285).

4. Caffeine
Caffeine may help to increase nervous system function(286)(287)(288) but it may causes nervous tension(289)(290)and vitamin B6 deficiency(291) in induced PMS, causing unbalance of production of serotonin and melatonin hormone(279)(280) resulting in insomnia.

5. Low levels of melatonin
Melatonin is hormone which helps to regulate the sleep pattern(279)(280) of our body. some women with PMS found to have low levels of melatonin(290)(292) before period caused by low levels of serotonin and tytrophan(275)(276)(277). Intake of food with high in serotonin and tytrophan will help to improve insomnia.

5. Insulin irregularity
Lower insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations is associated to elevating premenstrual syndrome disorder(270). Researchers exam the inter relationship between insomnia and insulin fluctuation found out that improving insulin balancing will aid the sleep pattern and via versa(293)(294)(295).

Premenstrual Syndrome(PMS) induces Migraine headache

Migraine headache are the most common symptoms of PMS(297), effected about 30%(296) of women just before or on the days of period. While headache does not accompany with symptoms, migraine usually followed by series of symptoms(298)(299), such as menstrual cramp and pain(299), bloating, fatigue, and irritability(300).

1. Serotonin
Serotonin secreted by the pituitary gland(300) when we come to stress(301) and during migraine attack effects the blood vessels in the brain(301), cause of irritation to the nervous system, such as affective, cognitive, and behavioural symptoms(301) and migraine headache(302)(303) last for hours(303).

2. Allergic reaction
For what whatever reasons, some women with pre menstrual syndrome may be sensitive to food such as fat, carbohydrate (P < 0.05) and simple sugars, etc. probably due to cyclical hormonal or neurotransmitter fluctuations(309). just before period cause of migraine headache(310).

3. Hormone imbalance
Levels of serotonin also showed to effect the production of reproductive hormones. Imbalance high levels of estrogen and low levels of progesterone, may cause a wide range of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and eating disorders, along with other conditions such as obesity and migraine(305).

4. Medication
Some medication including psychostimulant drugs of abuse(304) and medication over uses(305) such as bromocriptine used to reduce levels of prolactin(306) for women with breast pain(307) before period may cause headache and migraine(308).

5. Magnesium deficiency
Magnesium deficiency is found to be associated to patients with migraine headache(311).
Magnesium regulates the levels of blood sugar(312)(313), and stops the blood vessels spam, during migraine attack(314)(315).

Premenstrual Syndrome(PMS) Induces of Breast Tenderness

Breast tenderness effects more than 70% of women in the US alone. Sometimes, it is so painful that some women afraid to be hugged and are experience uncomfortable during sleep.

1. Caffeine
Caffeine is a stimulant, containing methylxanthines, a chemical exhibited the symptoms of PMS(4) including breast tenderness(320)(321), breast pain(316)(317) and induced fibrocystic breast disease(317)(318). Reducing intake of foods containing caffeine such as coffee, tea 3 to 4 days before period may help to reduce the symptoms of breast tenderness and pain(316)(319).

2. Stress
Prolactin produced abundant by during baby feeding(324), may also be released during prolong period of stress(322)(323) to cause breast tenderness(325)(326)(327) for some women with PMS.

2. Hormone imbalance
Some women may experience breast changes during menstrual cycle(328). The problem is linked to the cycle, caused by the fluctuation of levels of estrogen and progesterone as resulting of hormonal imbalance(329).

3. Sluggish Liver
Liver is important in carbohydrate(330), fat(331) and protein(332) metabolism. Sluggish liver causes abnormal function of liver in regulating the levels of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids(333), and induced imbalance of levels of PGE2 induced breast tenderness and pain(334)(335).

4. Nutrients deficiency
a)Vitamins and minerals deficiency
For what ever reason, women with pre menstrual syndrome are found to have low levels of micronutrients(337)(338)(339)(340), of that can lead to over production of levels of PGE2(339) which causes PMS including breast tenderness and pain(334)(335).

b) Omega 3 fatty acid deficiency
As we mention before, Omega 3 fatty is important to inhibit the levels of PG2(331). Deficiency of Omega 3 fatty acid causes high levels of PGE2(331) in the bloodstream induced breast tenderness and pain(334)(335).

5. Prostaglandins hormone
Balancing of prostaglandins hormone is vital in regulating the uterus muscles(336) during menstrual cycle. If the levels of PGE2(334)(335) of the prostaglandins is getting too high, it may cause breast tenderness and breast pain(334)(335) for women with PMS.


       The adverse effects of Artificial Sweetener


1. Is artificial sweetener safe?
We are made to believe no calories sweetener promoted control weigh(59) and misled in believing that sweetener is better than sugar, Unfortunately, consumption sweetener was associated to weigh gain in the study of a sample of 22,231 adults(60)
In fact, it is not true. Sugar helps to provide energy for our body need, over consumption is the problem while sweetener contains aspartame, the substance causes more harm than good to our body including brain(62) and heart(61) and symptoms of pre menstrual syndrome such as depression, mood change(62) and anxiety(63).

2. Serotonin
Artificial sweetener depresses the nervous system(67) in fighting against stress resulting in less levels of serotonin(65) being produced leading to mood swing and depression(62).

3. Amino acids
Amino acids are important for liver in protein metabolism(66). Artificial sweetener contains high levels of aspartic and phenylalanine over 150 times sweeter than sugar, taking artificial sweetener may cause over dose of such amino acids(68) resulting in increasing the risk of nervous tension leading to memory lose, mood swing, depression and symptoms of PMS(63).

4. Methanol
When digest, methanol in the sweetener converts to formaldehyde(71) which is toxic to our body resulting in unbalancing the protein metabolism of the brain(70) leading to symptoms of PMS such as mood swing, depression(62) and anxiety(63). if it is over dose.

5. Addictive
The chemical aspartame is so addictive. It is wise to stop taking artificial sweetener slowly or ask your doctor for help. Abruptly stop taking aspartame may cause withdrawal symptoms(71).

6. Obesity and metabolic syndrome
Long term consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS), particularly aspartame in perigestational period has shown to predispose offspring to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome later in life(64)(69).

               The Adverse effects of Alcohol

1. Liver functions
Moderate intake of no more than 2 glasses of wine is helpful in liver carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism(73) by increasing the blood flow and awareness of the nervous system. Excessive drinking damages the liver function(72)(73).
a) Detoxifying
Liver is a first line defense of our body besides in fighting against foreign invasion such as forming of free radical and bacteria and virus(74), it also helps to detoxify our body toxic(75) caused by environment toxins accumulation or any harmful substance coming into our body through diet or the air we breath, etc. Without strong liver , it causes over production of estrogen(76) resulting in premenstrual syndrome.

b) Menstrual pain and cramps
Without strong liver function, it induced over production of bad prostaglandins hormone PGE2(77) in promoting over reacted uterine muscle cause of menstrual pain and cramps(78).

c) Food craving
Liver is essential in regulating the pancreas in production of insulin(79). Abnormal function of liver in crease the risk of over production of insulin, leading to food craving(80) and over production of adrenaline hormone which causes stress(81).

2. Nutritions and minerals deficiency
Alcohol inhibits the breakdown of vitamins and minerals into usable molecule by decreasing digestive enzymes secretion and damage the lining of stomach in absorbing vital nutrients(82) by blocking the transportation of nutrients into the blood stream resulting in nutrients deficiency(82) including vitamin B complex, zinc, magnesium, potassium etc. leading to symptoms of PMS.
Example : Low levels of zinc causes over production of prolaclin(84) resulting in breast tenderness(83)
Low levels of potassium causes abnormal lymphatic function(85) and high levels of
sodium resulting in fluid retention(86).

3. Liver dysfunction
Moderate drinking alcohol generally produces feelings of relaxation and cheerfulness, but excessive drinking has the opposite effects in causing liver steatosis as fatty acids build up as plaques in the capillary around liver cells(87), leading to increase the severeness of symptoms of PMS(76).


               The Adverse effects of Caffeine

1. Vitamins and minerals deficiency
Food containing caffeine also contains tannin(88) which block the digestive system in absorbing of vitamins and minerals in the digestive tract(1)t including iron, zinc, copper(89), magnesium(90), etc., the vital vitamins and minerals for women with PMS.

2. Unbalance of blood sugar
Caffeine is a stimulant, it helps to improve the function of nervous system(91) if it is taken in a right dose. Over dose of caffeine causes suddenly surge and fall of blood sugar(92) in the blood stream resulting in over production of adrenaline hormone(93)(94) leading to symptoms of PMS(95).

3. Methylxathines
Methylxathines in food containing caffeine inhibits the actions of sleepiness induces adenosine(98) and treat symptoms of asthma(99)(100), but may exhibit side effects of breast tenderness(96), begnin lumps(96)(97) and breast pain(97).

4. Theophylline and theobromine
Foods containing caffeine also contains methylxathines and theobromine which contrite to relaxed muscle(101) and improved blood pressure, if they are taken in small dose. Over dose of methylxathines and theobromine may increase the risk of blood sugar unbalance(102) leading to over production adrenaline hormone(103) causes of PMS symptoms(95).

5. Addictive
Caffeine is so additive(104),. It narrows your blood vessels(105) when taken. complete stop suddenly may induce symptoms of greater sleepiness, lower mental alertness, and poorer performance on simple reaction time, choice reaction time and recognition memory tasks, etc.(106). It is wise to stop it slowly over a period of time.

The Adverse effects of Smoking


1. Hormone imbalance
Smoking not only increases the risk of lung cancer(107), it also depletes the levels of good estrogen and exhibit the levels of bad estrogen(109) causing hormone imbalance resulting in increasing the risk of pre menstrual syndrome(110) and PMS symptoms(111) for some smoking women.

2. Immune system
Cadmium is very toxins(108), it has an ability to attach to arteries wall(plagues)(114) and make the wall thinner, leading to increased cardiovascular mortality and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease(113) and decreasing heart function in blood transportation of nutrients and oxygen to our body cells need, which contributes to nutrients deficiency(115) cause of symptoms of premenstrual syndrome(116)

3. Toxin accumulation
Cigarette contain high levels of toxic chemical compound(112) that may danger to your health including increasing nervous tension(117) and weakening the immune system(118) such as negative allergic reaction(118) and irregular cells growth(118), etc.

4. Mineral deficiency
Cigarette contain high levels of cadmium which inhibits the minerals Ca, Zn, Se, Cr and Fe and deficiencies(119) causing minerals deficiency(115) elevating symptoms of PMS.

5. Vitamin deficiency
Women with premenstrual syndrome are found to have a low levels of B vitamins(120), namely
Thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, and vitamin B-12. Smoking decreased concentrations of several antioxidant vitamins, thus increasing risk of premenstrual syndrome(121)..


The Adverse effects of Salt

1. Water retention
Women with PMS are found to have low levels of potassium, increasing intake of sodium (salt)may enhance the abnormal function of pituitary gland(122) and lymphatic function(123)(124)causing breast tenderness and water retention accordingly.

2. Adrenaline hormone
High sodium diet, increases the risk of over production of adrenaline hormone(125) effecting levels of blood sugar(126) in triggering more symptoms of PMS(127).

3. High blood pressure
High sodium diet for a prolong period of time causes high blood pressure(128), causes hydration and stiffness of the vascular wall(129) that interfere with the function of our in regulating the blood flow in the arteries and transport nutrients for brain health(130), leading nervous tension such as mood swing, anxiety and physical and emotional stress for some women with PMS.

The Adverse effects of Dairy Foods

1. Saturated fat
Dairy food containing high amount of saturated fat, one form of triglycerides increases liver fat accumulation and interferes the function of liver in secreting bile(131) in fat and protein metabolism, leading to nutrients deficiency(132)cause of premenstrual syndrome.

2. Magnesium deficiency
Dairy foods containing substances block the digestive system in mineral absorption, including magnesium. Mg is vital for women with PMS, deficiency may cause nervous tension, leading to anxiety(133) and depression(133) syndrome.

3. Arachidonic acid (AA)
arachidonic acid found diary foods showed to convert to bad prostaglandins hormone(134)(135)in interference with our body in production of good prostaglandins hormone, leading to over active uterine muscle cause of menstrual pain and cramps.

4. Hormone imbalance
Daily products made from milk produced by hormonal enhanced cows may interfere with natural production of menstrual hormones in women body, leading to abnormal menstrual cycle, including premenstrual syndrome in some women(136)(137).

The Effects of Phytoestrogens

Phytoestrogens also known as dietary estrogen, are non steroidal plant compounds, having a structural similarity of estradiol with ability to promote estrogenic(138)(139) and anti estrogenic(140) effects.

1. Hormone balancing
As we mentioned in the definition, phytoestrogens in the plant have the ability to lower levels of estrogen if it is too high and higher the levels of estrogen if it is too low(140)(141). Since most women with pre-mentsrual syndrome always have some kinds of hormone imbalance(143), intake of photyestrogens not only restores the balance, but also reduces the symptoms of PMS, such as headache and breast tenderness(142).

2. Hormone stimulating
Phytoestrogens also have the ability to regulating the levels of sex hormone binding globulin SHBG(144) circulating in the bloodstream. SHBG is produced by liver in fat and protein metabolism(144) and the right levels of SHBG help to reduce symptoms of PMS(145).

3. Menstrual cycle
Intake of phytoestrogens induced reduction of over production of estrogen(138)(139)(140) causes of mammary cancers(147)(148) through increased the length of menstrual cycle(146).

4. Liver booster
Phytoestrogen also increases the liver function(150) in regulating the levels of prostaglandins hormone by fat and protein metabolism, thus lessening the menstrual pain and cramps(149)(151) for some women with PMS.

The Effects of Fatty Acids



I. Types of Fat Acids
1. Mono-unsaturated fats
Mono-unsaturated have only one double bond between 2 carbon atoms in the chemical chain and the rest of the carbon atoms are single-bonded, therefore, mono-unsaturated fatty acids have a higher melting temperature than polyunsaturated fatty acids but lower than saturated fatty acids, liquid at room temperature. Since our body can not produce them, we have to take them regularly.

2. Poly-unsaturated fats
Poly-unsaturated fats contains 2 or more double bonds in the chemical chain. Since it is one hydrogen atom deficits on the molecule's surface, leading to significant lowering melting temperature than other fats. It is also liquid in the room temperature and contains most important essential fatty acids Omega 3 and 6. Since our body can not make them, we have to take them regularly.

3. Saturated fats
Saturated fat contains only saturated fatty acid radicals. Chemically, in saturated fats every member carbon atoms is surrounded by maximum number of hydrogen as a straight chain with all atoms packing together tightly.

4. Trans fats
By adding hydrogen to the vegetable oils and eliminating some double bond in their chemical structures, to make the oils solid at room temperature, trans fats raise bad cholesterol (LDL) and lower the good cholesterol (HDL) and it can be found everywhere, including margarine, fast foods, vegetable shortening, baked foods, packaged foods and frozen foods.

II. The Effects
A. Liver
Over consumption of saturated fat reduces function of liver(152) in secreting bile and interference with liver in regulating function of pancreas in insulin production(152), elevating symptoms of PMS including menstrual cramp and pain(153)(154).

B. Prostaglandins hormones
1. Definition
Prostaglandins are found in most tissues and organs. They are produced by all nucleated cells except lymphocytes. Prostaglandins are generated from
a) Gamma linoneic acid ( GLA)
b) Arachidinic acid (AA)
c) Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)

2. How prostaglandins effect women with PMS
a. Gamma linoneic acid ( GLA)
GLA is also known as essential Omega 6 fatty acid, having anti-inflammatory properties found primarily in vegetable oils. It may also be converted from linolenic acid before converting to prostaglandins PGE1(156) with function in regulating the uterine contraction(155). If there are blockage caused abnormal function of fat and protein metabolism, imbalance of essential Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids(155) and nutrients deficiency(157), may induce imbalance of prostaglandins hormones, to cause over contraction of uterine muscles(155).

b. Arachidinic acid (AA)
Arachidinic acid (AA) is also converted from linoleic acids after converting to dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DGLA). Arachidinic acid (AA) deficiency or over abundant cause over production of PGE2 in inducing symptoms of PMS including menstrual pain and cramps(160) and reduced blood flow to the uterus(155)(159). Since meats contain high levels of AA(158), reducing intake of such products will help to restore the balance of prostaglandins hormone PG1 and PG2.

c. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)
Omega 3 fatty acid containing eicosapentaenoic acid is also known as also eicosapentaenoic acid converted from Alpha-linolenic acid(161). EPA is vital for the production of good prostaglandins PGE3 in lessening the risk of inflammation(162) and nervous symptoms of PMS(163).

Unbalance of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids causes unbalance of hormone of members in the prostaglandins and weakens the liver in fatty acids metabolism, leading to increased risk of symptoms of premenstrual syndrome(154)(155)(156).

C. Saturated fat
Saturated fat is fat consisted of triglycerides and contained only saturated fatty acid radicals mainly from animals. It blocks the absorption of nutrients in the digestive system including essential fatty acids and vitamins and minerals(164), leading to unbalance of prostaglandins family and interfering liver in fat and protein metabolism(163), if consumed in large amount. By the way, saturated fat also enhances building up of cholesterol and triglycerides in your blood, causing numbers of disease including heart diseases and stroke(165). 

Treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome(PMS) IN TCM perspective

A. PMS caused by Liver blood stagnation in Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective
Liver blood stagnation, is a milder form of impaired blood flow(167) in the abdominal region(166) including uterus causes of menstrual pain and cramps(166)(167) before the period. By releasing the blood stagnation, in the abdomen, certain herbs have shown to relieve symptoms of PMS, including migraine(167).
1. Angelica root
Angelica root is a queen for women reproductive system, used in traditional Chinese medicine in tonifying blood, promoting blood circulation(167), regulating menstruation(166), alleviating pain(167), and lubricating the bowels to relieve constipation(168), probably through its phytochemicalsè estrogenic(177)(178) and antiestrogenic(179) activities.
Angelica root also showed a protective effect against kidney injure(170)(171), radiation(172), cancers(173)(174)(180), osteoarthritis (OA)(175) and to improve immunity(169), dementia(181), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), menopausal symptoms(182), menopausal symptoms(183), etc. in modern studies.

2. Peony (Shao Yao)
Peony has been used in Chinese medicine in treating liver(185)(22)(27) blood stagnation(184) and induced blood flow by increasing the liver in blood formation(184) and promoting circulatory system for providing nutrients to our body need to nourish menstruation(185), relaxing spasm(187), relieving pain(187) and liver dysfunction(185) causes of tension of nervous system, such as anxiety(30).

Peony also showed a protective effect against influenza(185)(186), inflammatory diseases(189)(190), diabetes(191)(192)(193)and triglycerides accumlation(191), cancers(186)(188), and to promote would healing(194), etc.. in modern studies.

3. Spatholobus spp (Ji Xue Teng)
Spathholobus spp is a blood tonic medicine, used in TCM to treat reproductive system disorders caused by blood stagnation(202) or blood deficiency(203), through increasing the production of blood(199) and moving the blood(202) for alleviating menstrual pain and cramps(204).

Spatholobus spp (Ji Xue Teng) also showed a protective effect againstosteoarthritis (OA)(196), cancers(197)(198), fungal infection(199). inflammatory diseases(200), neurodegenerative disorders(201), etc.. in modern studies.

4. Ligusticum wallichi (Chuan Xiong)(205)
Ligustium wallichi(206) is also a herb for tonified blood circulation, including the abdominal region, used in Chinese medicine as reproductive system(207) enhancing herb through unblock blood vessels(208), regulate menstruation(207).


Ligusticum wallichi (Chuan Xiong) also showed a protective effect invasorelaxant activity(208); improved the Left Ventricular Ejection Fractionof central nervous system(209), against dementia(210)(214), atherosclerosis(211), renal tubule damage(212), inflammation(213), myocardial ischemic reperfusion(215), lens opacification(216), etc.. in modern studies.

5. Red sage roots (Dan Shen)
Red sage root is a main Chinese medicine used for treatment of blood stagnation(217) in the abdominal region by improving the blood circulation in the body including abdominal region and breaking up stagnation(217).

Red sage roots (Dan Shen) also showed a protective effect of CNS(220) and againstinjuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (craniocerebral injury), degeneration of spinal disks in the neck (cervical spondylosis) and brain dysfunctions related to disease of the blood vessels (cerebrovascular diseases)(218),atherosclerosis(54), convulsant activit(219), hepatitis B(221), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)(222), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)(223)(224), etc. in modern studies.

B.  PMS caused by Liver Qi stagnation in Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective

Liver is important in carbohydrate synthesis and fat and protein metabolism(225). Liver qi stagnation causes abnormal function of liver in regulating the production of estrogen(226) and other hormones by glands(226) for controlling menstrual blood(227), leading to blood stagnation in the productive system and inducing symptoms of premenstrual syndrome including irritability, anger, depression(228)(229), etc,.

1. Angelica synthesis (Dang Qui)
Angelica synthesis, a queen herb for women reproductive tonic, has been used in traditional Chinese medicine in treating all women productive disorder(230) by releasing the qi stagnation cause of blood stasis(231) including pre menstrual syndrome. probably through its phytochemicals estrogenic(232)(233) and antiestrogenic(234) activities in restored hormone imbalance before ovulation and inhibited the over active uterus muscles(235)(236)(237) cause of pre menstrual pain and cramps(238)(239) and irregular menstruation(239).

2. Milk thistle seed
Milk thistle seed used in the traditional Western medicine over thousand year for liver tonic, showed to restore the liver qi stagnation caused by environment toxins and other toxins(239) and regenerate the liver's cells(240) in reduced symptoms of PMS(241) caused by the changes in monoamine neurotransmitters(241)

3. Peony (Shao Yao)
White peony showed to sooth liver qi stagnation(242) through a blood purifier and induced blood flow by increasing the liver in blood formation(243) and nourishing menstruation(244), relaxing spasm(245), relieving pain(245) and liver dysfunction(244) causes of tension of nervous system, such as anxiety(246)

4. Fennel seed (Xiao Hu Xiang)
Fennel seed released the stagnation caused by imbalance of yin yang qi in the liver(247) causes of reduced blood flow in inhibition symptoms of pain and cramps(248).

5. Yellow dock root
Yellow dock root, a liver tonic medicine(249), detoxifies liver by removing oxidative damage accumulated in the liver(250) induced liver dysfunction in regulating the production of hormones(226) before and after ovulation.

C. Premenstrual Syndrome(PMS) caused by Kidney deficiency in Chinese Herbs Perspective

Chinese herbalists believe that PMS is also caused by
a) Deficiency of yang qi in the kidney showed to presence with over production of bad estrogen(255) and induce kidney abnormal function in regulating fluid circulation(258), causing symptoms of anxiety, panic attacks, fear(252), fatigue, lightheadedness, and headache(251)

b) Deficiency of yin normally happens to women in peri menopause and may also induce symptoms of menopause to women with PMS such as hair dry, restlessness, excitability, hard stool(253), painful back and knees, dry vagina, dysphoria with feverish sensation in the chest, palms and soles, etc.(254), due to low levels of estrogen produced before period(255),

1. Rehmannia glutinosa (Shu Di Huang)
Rehmannia glutinosa has been used in traditional Chinese medicine in treating kidney disorder(256)(257) to restore the balance of yin and yang qi of the kidney for treatment of symptoms of water retention(258), weight gain(259) in kidney yin deficiency women with pre menstrual syndrome, probably through raising levels of estrogen(259).

2. Morinda root(Ba Ji Tian)
Morinda root has been used in traditional medicine for treatment kidney yang deficiency to improve menstrual difficulties(262) through hormone bablancing(263), reduce antispasmodic effects and fluid retention(261) and induce blood flow(260) for lessening the symptoms of cramp and pain(261) and blood stagnation some women with PMS.

3. Cuscuta (Tu Si Zi)
Cuscuta, a kidney tonic medicine(264), showed to restore the balance the yin and yang qi of the kidney for treatment of water retention(264) and cramp and pain(15) in women with PMS, induce sex desire through raising the levels of testosterone in women with yang kidney qi deficiency(266) and reduce nervous tension(267), probably through reduction of NO-mediated formation

4. Cinnamon Bark (Rou Gui)
Cinnamon bark, a qi tonic herb(very hot in nature), has been used in traditional Chinese medicine release the qi stagnation of our body including liver and kidney, for treatment of cramp and pain(268), nervous tension and eating disorder, probably through regulation of 5-Hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT; Serotonin) is an important neurotransmitter.

1000 top Paleo Recipes
The Natural Way to Make Delicious, Healthy,
Fat-Burning Paleo Recipes Quickly And Easily

Ovarian Cysts And PCOS Elimination
Holistic System In Existence That Will Show You How To
Permanently Eliminate All Types of Ovarian Cysts Within 2 Months 

Super foods Library, Eat Yourself Healthy With The Best of the Best Nature Has to Offer

Back to Popular Herbs http://kylejnorton.blogspot.ca/p/popular-herbs.html
Back to Kyle J. Norton Home page http://kylejnorton.blogspot.ca


References
(1) Estrogen and/or progesterone administered systemically or to the amygdala can have anxiety-, fear-, and pain-reducing effects in ovariectomized rats by Frye CA1, Walf AA.(PubMed)
(2) Progesterone withdrawal decreases latency to and increases duration of electrified prod burial: a possible rat model of PMS anxiety by Gallo MA1, Smith SS.(PubMed)
(3) A review and update of mechanisms of estrogen in the hippocampus and amygdala for anxiety and depression behavior by Walf AA1, Frye CA.(PubMed)
(4) Progesterone facilitates exploration, affective and social behaviors among wildtype, but not 5α-reductase Type 1 mutant, mice by Koonce CJ1, Frye CA.(PubMed)
(5) Dynamic changes in serum estradiol and progesterone levels in patients of premenstrual syndrome with adverse flow of liver-qi by Qiao M1, Zhang H, Yu Y, Ci Y, Xu X, Ye Q, Chen Y.(PubMed)
(6) Premenstrual syndrome and associated symptoms in adolescent girls by Derman O1, Kanbur NO, Tokur TE, Kutluk T.(PubMed)
(7) Brain serotonin, carbohydrate-craving, obesity and depression by Wurtman RJ1, Wurtman JJ.(PubMed)
(8) Carbohydrate craving. Relationship between carbohydrate intake and disorders of mood by Wurtman JJ.(PubMed)
(9) Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for premenstrual syndrome by Marjoribanks J1, Brown J, O'Brien PM, Wyatt K.(PubMed)
(10) Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in perimenopausal women by Chung SH1, Kim TH1, Lee HH1, Lee A1, Jeon DS1, Park J1, Kim Y2.(PubMed)
(11) Treatment of premenstrual syndrome with a phytopharmaceutical formulation containing Vitex agnus castus by Loch EG1, Selle H, Boblitz N.(PubMed)
(12) Effect of an oral contraceptive containing 30 microg ethinylestradiol plus 3 mg drospirenone on body composition of young women affected by premenstrual syndrome with symptoms of water retention.by Fruzzetti F1, Lazzarini V, Ricci C, Quirici B, Gambacciani M, Paoletti AM, Genazzani AR.(PubMed)
(13) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pituitary_gland(wikipedia)
(14) [Regulation of the interstitial fluid volume]. [Article in Japanese] by Kawahara K1, Yasuoka Y, Kawada H.(PubMed)
(15) Impairment of lymphatic function in women with gynoid adiposity and swelling syndrome by L'Hermitte F1, Behar A, Pariès J, Cohen-Boulakia F, Attali JR, Valensi P.(PubMed)
(16) Indirect evidence to suggest that prolactin induces salt retention in cirrhosis by Soupart A1, Buisson L, Prospert F, Decaux G.(PubMed)
(17) Premenstrual syndrome: diagnosis and intervention by Ugarriza DN1, Klingner S, O'Brien S.(PubMed)
(18) [An overview of premenstrual syndrome].[Article in French] by Zaafrane F1, Faleh R, Melki W, Sakouhi M, Gaha L.(PubMed)
(19) The heritability of premenstrual syndrome.by Zahanfar S1, Lye MS, Krishnarajah IS.(PubMed)
(20) Premenstrual syndrome in Turkish medical students and their quality of life by Goker A1, Artunc-Ulkumen B, Aktenk F, Ikiz N.(PubMed)
(21) Premenstrual syndrome symptomatology among married women of fertileage based on methods of contraception (hormonal versus non-hormonal methods of contraception) by Bakhshani NM1, Hosseinbor M, Shahraki Z, Sakhavar N(PubMed)
(22) Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in perimenopausal women by Chung SH1, Kim TH1, Lee HH1, Lee A1, Jeon DS1, Park J1, Kim Y2.(PubMed)
(23) Early life emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and the development ofpremenstrual syndrome: a longitudinal study by ertone-Johnson ER1, Whitcomb BW, Missmer SA, Manson JE, Hankinson SE, Rich-Edwards JW(PubMed)
(24) Cigarette smoking and the development of premenstrual syndrome byBertone-Johnson ER1, Hankinson SE, Johnson SR, Manson JE.(PubMed)
(25) Timing of alcohol use and the incidence of premenstrual syndrome and probable premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Bertone-Johnson ER1, Hankinson SE, Johnson SR, Manson JE.(PubMed)
(26) Maternal age and number of children are risk factors for depressive disorders in non-perinatal women of reproductive age by Aras N1, Oral E, Aydin N, Gulec M.(PubMed)
(27) Intake of selected minerals and risk of premenstrual syndrome byChocano-Bedoya PO1, Manson JE, Hankinson SE, Johnson SR, Chasan-Taber L, Ronnenberg AG, Bigelow C, Bertone-Johnson ER.(PubMed)
(28) Caffeine-containing beverages, total fluid consumption, and premenstrual syndrome by Rossignol AM1, Bonnlander H.(PubMed)
(29) Prevalence and severity of the premenstrual syndrome. Effects of foods and beverages that are sweet or high in sugar content by Rossignol AM1, Bonnlander H.(PubMed)
(30) Hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone and ovarian steroids in women with recurrent early miscarriage. Watson H1, Kiddy DS, Hamilton-Fairley D, Scanlon MJ, Barnard C, Collins WP, Bonney RC, Franks S.(PubMed)
(31) Growth hormone secretion during termination of pregnancy. Further evidence of a placental variant. Eriksson L1, Frankenne F, Edén S, Hennen G, von Schoultz B.(PubMed)
(32) Molecular basis of thyrotropin and thyroid hormone action during implantation and early development. Colicchia M1, Campagnolo L2, Baldini E3, Ulisse S3, Valensise H4, Moretti C5.(PubMed)
(33) Ecological validity and clinical utility of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) instruments for detectingpremenstrual symptoms of depression, anger, and fatigue by Junghaenel DU1, Schneider S2, Stone AA2, Christodoulou C2, Broderick JE2.(PubMed)
(34) Sleep quality and the sleep electroencephalogram in women with severepremenstrual syndrome by Baker FC1, Kahan TL, Trinder J, Colrain IM.(PubMed)
(35) Premenstrual anxiety and depression: comparison of objective psychological tests with a retrospective questionnaire by Chisholm G1, Jung SO, Cumming CE, Fox EE, Cumming DC.(PubMed)
(36) Premenstrual syndrome: a psychological overview by Riven L.(PubMed)
(37) Menstrual mood disorders are associated with blunted sympathetic reactivity to stress by Klatzkin RR1, Bunevicius A2, Forneris CA2, Girdler S2.(PubMed)
(38) Factors associated with premenstrual syndrome - a survey of new female university students by Cheng SH1, Shih CC, Yang YK, Chen KT, Chang YH, Yang YC.(PubMed)
(39) Beneficial effects of enteral fat administration on liver dysfunction, liverlipid accumulation, and protein metabolism in septic rats by Hayashi N1, Kashiwabara N, Yoshihara D, Takeshita Y, Handa H, Yanai M, Maeda J, Yamakawa M.(PubMed)
(40) Vitamin and trace element status in premenstrual syndrome by Mira M1, Stewart PM, Abraham SF.(PubMed)
(41) A synergistic effect of a daily supplement for 1 month of 200 mgmagnesium plus 50 mg vitamin B6 for the relief of anxiety-relatedpremenstrual symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study by De Souza MC1, Walker AF, Robinson PA, Bolland K.(PubMed)
(42) Nutritional factors in the etiology of the premenstrual tension syndromes by Abraham GE.(PubMed)
(43) Thyroid axis function during the menstrual cycle in women withpremenstrual syndrome by Girdler SS1, Pedersen CA, Light KC.(PubMed)
(44) Thyroid function and treatment in premenstrual syndrome by Nikolai TF1, Mulligan GM, Gribble RK, Harkins PG, Meier PR, Roberts RC.(PubMed)
(45) The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in mood disorders by Young EA1, Korszun A.(PubMed)
(46 Carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c): two key regulators of glucose metabolism and lipid synthesis in liver by Dentin R1, Girard J, Postic C.(PubMed)
(47) The high-sweet-fat food craving among women with premenstrualdysphoric disorder: emotional response, implicit attitude and rewards sensitivity by Yen JY1, Chang SJ, Ko CH, Yen CF, Chen CS, Yeh YC, Chen CC.(PubMed)
(48) Effect of an oral contraceptive containing 30 microg ethinylestradiol plus 3 mg drospirenone on body composition of young women affected by premenstrual syndrome with symptoms of water retention.by Fruzzetti F1, Lazzarini V, Ricci C, Quirici B, Gambacciani M, Paoletti AM, Genazzani AR.(PubMed)
(49) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pituitary_gland(wikipedia)
(50) [Regulation of the interstitial fluid volume]. [Article in Japanese] by Kawahara K1, Yasuoka Y, Kawada H.(PubMed)
(51) Impairment of lymphatic function in women with gynoid adiposity and swelling syndrome by L'Hermitte F1, Behar A, Pariès J, Cohen-Boulakia F, Attali JR, Valensi P.(PubMed)
(52) The incidence of premenstrual tension in a gynecologic clinic by Hargrove JT, Abraham GE.(PubMed)
(53) Heart rate variability in premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Landén M1, Wennerblom B, Tygesen H, Modigh K, Sörvik K, Ysander C, Ekman A, Nissbrandt H, Olsson M, Eriksson E.(PubMed)
(54) Thyroid hormones and the heart by Vargas-Uricoechea H, Sierra-Torres CH.(PubMed)
(55) Hormone replacement therapy (estrogen and progesterone): is it necessary for heart disease prevention? by Freeman R.(PubMed)
(56) Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder among Jordanian women by Hamaideh SH1, Al-Ashram SA, Al-Modallal H.(PubMed)
(57) Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on intensity of primary dysmenorrhea byRahbar N1, Asgharzadeh N, Ghorbani R.(PubMed)
(58) [Etiopathogenesis of dysmenorrhea].[Article in Polish] by Mrugacz G1, Grygoruk C, Sieczyński P, Grusza M, Bołkun I, Pietrewicz P.(PubMed)
(59) Low and no calorie sweeteners (LNCS); myths and realities. Riobó Serván P1, Sierra Poyatos R2, Soldo Rodríguez J3.(PubMed)
(60) Consumption of low-calorie sweeteners among U.S. adults is associated with higher Healthy Eating Index (HEI 2005) scores and more physical activity. Drewnowski A1, Rehm CD2.(PubMed)
(61) Modified High-Density Lipoproteins by Artificial Sweetener, Aspartame, and Saccharin, Showed Loss of Anti-atherosclerotic Activity and Toxicity in Zebrafish. Kim JY1, Park KH, Kim J, Choi I, Cho KH.(PubMed)
(62) Neurobehavioral effects of aspartame consumption. Lindseth GN1, Coolahan SE, Petros TV, Lindseth PD.(PubMed)
(63) Anxiety in mice following acute aspartame and ethanol exposure. LaBuda CJ1, Hale RL.(PubMed)
(64) Exposure to non-nutritive sweeteners during pregnancy and lactation: Impact in programming of metabolic diseases in the progeny later in life. Araújo JR1, Martel F2, Keating E3.(PubMed)
(65) Effects of repeated doses of aspartame on serotonin and its metabolite in various regions of the mouse brain. Sharma RP, Coulombe RA Jr.(PubMed)
(66) Relation between glutamine, branched-chain amino acids, and protein metabolism. Holecek M.(PubMed)
(67) Effects of aspartame metabolites on astrocytes and neurons. Rycerz K1, Jaworska-Adamu JE.(PubMed)
(68) Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man. Møller SE.(PubMed)
(69) Aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults and adults heterozygous for phenylketonuria. by Stegink LD1, Wolf-Novak LC, Filer LJ Jr, Bell EF, Ziegler EE, Krause WL, Brummel MC.(PubMed)
(70) [Cognitive disorders in workers engaged into formaldehyde and methanol production]. [Article in Russian] [No authors listed](PubMed)
(71) Aspartame Withdrawal Symptoms: List Of Possibilities by Mental Health Daily Mental Health Blog
(72) Animals models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of alcohol-induced liver disease: pathophysiology, translational relevance, and challenges. Mathews S1, Xu M1, Wang H1, Bertola A1, Gao B2.(PubMed)
(73) Vodka and wine consumption in a swine model of metabolic syndrome alters insulin signaling pathways in the liver and skeletal muscle. Elmadhun NY1, Lassaletta AD, Chu LM, Bianchi C, Sellke FW.(PubMed)
(74) Liver-inherent immune system: its role in blood-stage malaria. Wunderlich F1, Al-Quraishy S2, Dkhil MA3(PubMed)
(75) [Humoral factors in the regulation of the natural resistance of the body in toxic lesion of the liver]. [Article in Russian] Stepanov IuB(PubMed)
(76) Differential effects of estrogen/androgen on the prevention of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the male rat. Zhang H1, Liu Y, Wang L, Li Z, Zhang H, Wu J, Rahman N, Guo Y, Li D, Li N, Huhtaniemi I, Tsang SY, Gao GF, Li X(PubMed)
(77) Effects of bile acids on the muscle functions of guinea pig gallbladder. Xiao ZL1, Rho AK, Biancani P, Behar J.(PubMed)
(78) Effects of naproxen sodium on menstrual prostaglandins and primary dysmenorrhea. Chan WY, Fuchs F, Powell AM.(PubMed)
(79) Whole-Body and Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Obese Children. Ibarra-Reynoso LD, Pisarchyk L, Pérez-Luque EL, Garay-Sevilla ME, Malacara JM(PubMed)
(80) Neural correlates of stress- and food cue-induced food craving in obesity: association with insulin levels. Jastreboff AM1, Sinha R, Lacadie C, Small DM, Sherwin RS, Potenza MN.(PubMed)
(81) Cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, serotonin, adrenaline and noradrenaline serum concentrations in relation to disease and stress in the horse. Ayala I1, Martos NF, Silvan G, Gutierrez-Panizo C, Clavel JG, Illera JC(PubMed)
(82) [Nutrition and chronic alcohol abuse]. [Article in Spanish] Moreno Otero R1, Cortés JR.(PubMed)
(83) Zinc and copper levels in premenstrual syndrome. Chuong CJ1, Dawson EB.(PubMed)
(84) Maternal zinc deficiency raises plasma prolactin levels in lactating rats. Chowanadisai W1, Kelleher SL, Lönnerdal B.(PubMed)
(85) [Roles of ATP-sensitive potassium pathway in regulating lymphatic function]. [Article in Chinese] Zhang LM1, Niu CY, Zhao ZG, Li K, Sun CY.(PubMed)
(86) High dietary sodium chloride consumption may not induce body fluid retention in humans. Heer M1, Baisch F, Kropp J, Gerzer R, Drummer C.(PubMed)
(87) [Effects of jingqianshu granule on expression of estrogen receptor alpha and beta mRNA in hypothalamus and hippocampus of PMS rats with liver-qi depression]. [Article in Chinese] Zhang H1, Ma J.(PubMed)
(88) Assessment of Anti-nutritive Activity of Tannins in Tea By-products Based on In vitro Rumen Fermentation by Kondo M1, Hirano Y2, Ikai N3, Kita K4, Jayanegara A5, Yokota HO3.(PubMed)
(89) [Factors which modify the nutritional state of iron: tannin content of herbal teas].[Article in Spanish] by Pizarro F1, Olivares M, Hertrampf E, Walter T.(PubMed)
(90) Rhubarb tannins extract inhibits the expression of aquaporins 2 and 3 inmagnesium sulphate-induced diarrhoea model by Liu C1, Zheng Y2, Xu W2, Wang H2, Lin N1.(PubMed)
(91) Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects by Nehlig A1, Daval JL, Debry G.(PubMed)
(92) Caffeine's impairment of insulin-mediated glucose disposal cannot be solely attributed to adrenaline in humans by Battram DS1, Graham TE, Dela F.(PubMed)
(93) Adrenaline rush: the role of adrenergic receptors in stimulant-induced behaviors by Schmidt KT1, Weinshenker D.(PubMed)
(84) [Correlation between neurotransmitters and neurosteroids and premenstrual syndrome patients of Gan-yang ascending syndrome and Gan-qi stagnation syndrome].[Article in Chinese] by Gao H1, Xia T, Qiao MQ.(PubMed)
(95) Adrenaline rush: the role of adrenergic receptors in stimulant-induced behaviors by Schmidt KT1, Weinshenker D.(PubMed)
(96) Methylxanthines and benign breast disease by Schairer C, Brinton LA, Hoover RN.(PubMed)
(97) Caffeine restriction as initial treatment for breast pain by Russell LC.(PubMed)
(98) Effect of caffeine on intravenous adenosine-induced hyperemia in fractional flow reserve measurement by Matsumoto H1, Nakatsuma K, Shimada T, Ushimaru S, Mikuri M, Yamazaki T, Matsuda T.(PubMed)
(99) [Asthma bronchiale: lung function is affected by coffeine].[Article in German] by Dinh QT1, Bals R.(PubMed)
(100) Can we find better bronchodilators to relieve asthma symptoms? by Townsend EA1, Yim PD, Gallos G, Emala CW.(PubMed)
(101) Opposite actions of caffeine and creatine on muscle relaxation time in humans by Hespel P1, Op't Eijnde B, Van Leemputte M.(PubMed)
(102) Differential effects of methylxanthines on local cerebral blood flow andglucose utilization in the conscious rat by Grome JJ, Stefanovich V.(PubMed)
(103) Mood, alertness and sympathetic-adrenal medullary activity during the menstrual cycle by Pátkai P, Johannson G, Post B.(PubMed)
(104) The buzz: is caffeine addiction real?[No authors listed](PubMed)
(105) Effects of chronic administration of ethanolic extract of kolanut (Cola nitida) and caffeine on vascular function by Salahdeen HM, Omoaghe AO, Isehunwa GO, Murtala BA, Alada AR.(PubMed)
(106) Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance by Rogers PJ1, Heatherley SV, Mullings EL, Smith JE.(PubMed)
(107) Lifetime probability of developing lung cancer, by smoking status, Canada by Villeneuve PJ1, Mao Y.(PubMed)
(108) Predicting lung cancer deaths from smoking prevalence data by Winkler V1, Ng N, Tesfaye F, Becher H.(PubMed)
(109) Impact of smoking on estrogenic efficacy by Ruan X1, Mueck AO.(PubMed)
(110) Association of menstrual phase with smoking behavior, mood and menstrual phase-associated symptoms among young Japanese women smokers by Sakai H1, Ohashi K.(PubMed)
(111) Global epidemiological study of variation of premenstrual symptoms with age and sociodemographic factors by Dennerstein L1, Lehert P, Heinemann K.(PubMed)
(112) Toxic metal concentrations in cigarettes obtained from U.S. smokers in 2009: results from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) United States survey cohort by Caruso RV1, O'Connor RJ2, Stephens WE3, Cummings KM4, Fong GT5.(PubMed)
(113) Cadmium exposure and incident cardiovascular disease by Tellez-Plaza M1, Guallar E, Howard BV, Umans JG, Francesconi KA, Goessler W, Silbergeld EK, Devereux RB, Navas-Acien A.(PubMed)
(114) Metal pollutants and bioelements: retrospective of interactions between magnesium and toxic metals by Soldatovic D1, Matovic V, Vujanovic D, Guiet-Bara A, Bara M, Durlach J.(PubMed)
(115) [Nutrition and chronic alcohol abuse]. [Article in Spanish] Moreno Otero R1, Cortés JR.(PubMed)
(116) Zinc and copper levels in premenstrual syndrome. Chuong CJ1, Dawson EB.(PubMed)
(117) Assessment of narghile (shisha, hookah) smokers' actual exposure totoxic chemicals requires further sound studies by Chaouachi K.(PubMed)
(118) Effects of cigarette smoking on the immune system. Follow-up studies in normal subjects after cessation of smoking by Hersey P, Prendergast D, Edwards A.(PubMed)
(119) Molecular basis of cadmium toxicity by Nath R, Prasad R, Palinal VK, Chopra RK.(PubMed)
(120) Long- and short-term effects of tobacco smoking on circulating concentrations of B vitamins by Ulvik A1, Ebbing M, Hustad S, Midttun Ø, Nygård O, Vollset SE, Bønaa KH, Nordrehaug JE, Nilsen DW, Schirmer H, Ueland PM.(PubMed)
(121) Dietary B vitamin intake and incident premenstrual syndrome byChocano-Bedoya PO1, Manson JE, Hankinson SE, Willett WC, Johnson SR, Chasan-Taber L, Ronnenberg AG, Bigelow C, Bertone-Johnson ER.(PubMed)
(122) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pituitary_gland(wikipedia)
(123) [Regulation of the interstitial fluid volume]. [Article in Japanese] by Kawahara K1, Yasuoka Y, Kawada H.(PubMed)
(124) Impairment of lymphatic function in women with gynoid adiposity and swelling syndrome by L'Hermitte F1, Behar A, Pariès J, Cohen-Boulakia F, Attali JR, Valensi P.(PubMed)
(125) Effects of low sodium diet versus high sodium diet on blood pressure, renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, cholesterol, and triglyceride by Graudal NA1, Hubeck-Graudal T, Jurgens G.(PubMed)
(126) Study on blood glucose concentration in patients with diabetes undergoing dental extraction under local anesthesia with and without adrenaline by Haji IU1, Siddiq M, Rao S, Rai G, Hiregoudar JS, Pitale U.(PubMed)
(127) [Correlation between neurotransmitters and neurosteroids andpremenstrual syndrome patients of Gan-yang ascending syndrome and Gan-qi stagnation syndrome].[Article in Chinese] by Gao H1, Xia T, Qiao MQ.(PubMed)
(128) Sodium intake and hypertension by Karppanen H1, Mervaala E.(PubMed)
(129) Sodium in blood vessels. A brief review by Friedman SM.(PubMed)
(130) Nutrients and brain health: an overview by Spencer JP.(PubMed)
(131) Overfeeding polyunsaturated and saturated fat causes distinct effects onliver and visceral fat accumulation in humans by Rosqvist F1, Iggman D2, Kullberg J3, Cedernaes J4, Johansson HE1, Larsson A5, Johansson L6, Ahlström H3, Arner P7, Dahlman I7, Risérus U8.(PubMed)
(132) Premenstrual dysphoric disorder. A guide for the treating clinician. Elliott H.(PubMed)
(133) [Magnesium deficiency and anxiety-depressive syndrome in elderly patients with chronic heart failure].[Article in Russian] by Uteva AG, Pimenov LT.(PubMed)
(134) An elucidation of the arachidonic acid cascade. Discovery ofprostaglandins, thromboxane and leukotrienes.by Samuelsson B.(PubMed)
(135) Prostaglandins, arachidonic acid, and inflammation by Kuehl FA Jr, Egan RW.(PubMed)
(136) Differences in free estradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin in women with and without premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Thys-Jacobs S1, McMahon D, Bilezikian JP.(PubMed)
(137) Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: guidelines for management by Steiner M.(PubMed)
(138)Synergistic Action of Flavonoids, Baicalein, and Daidzein in Estrogenicand Neuroprotective Effects: A Development of Potential Health Products and Therapeutic Drugs against Alzheimer's Disease by Choi RC1, Zhu JT, Yung AW, Lee PS, Xu SL, Guo AJ, Zhu KY, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(139) Flavonoids possess neuroprotective effects on cultured pheochromocytoma PC12 cells: a comparison of different flavonoids in activating estrogenic effect and in preventing beta-amyloid-induced cell death by Zhu JT1, Choi RC, Chu GK, Cheung AW, Gao QT, Li J, Jiang ZY, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(140) Isoflavones: chemistry, analysis, functions and effects on health and cancer by Ko KP.(PubMed)
(141) The physiological actions of isoflavone phytoestrogensby Pilšáková L1, Riečanský I, Jagla F.(PubMed)
(142) Effect of consumption of soy isoflavones on behavioural, somatic and affective symptoms in women with premenstrual syndrome by Bryant M1, Cassidy A, Hill C, Powell J, Talbot D, Dye L.(PubMed)
(143) Hormonal and volume dysregulation in women with premenstrual syndrome by Rosenfeld R1, Livne D, Nevo O, Dayan L, Milloul V, Lavi S, Jacob G.(PubMed)
(144) Effect of dietary components, including lignans and phytoestrogens, on enterohepatic circulation and liver metabolism of estrogens and on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) by Adlercreutz H1, Höckerstedt K, Bannwart C, Bloigu S, Hämäläinen E, Fotsis T, Ollus A.(PubMed)
(145) Serum levels of androgens are higher in women with premenstrual irritability and dysphoria than in controls by Eriksson E1, Sundblad C, Lisjö P, Modigh K, Andersch B.(PubMed)
(146) Effect of soymilk consumption on serum estrogen concentrations in premenopausal Japanese women by Nagata C1, Takatsuka N, Inaba S, Kawakami N, Shimizu H.(PubMed)
(147) Impact of obesity on mammary gland inflammation and local estrogenproduction by Brown KA.(PubMed)
(148) RANKL signaling promotes progesterone mediated estrogen inducedmammary carcinogenesis by Boopalan T1, Arumugam A, Parada J, Saltzstein E, Lakshmanaswamy R.(PubMed)
(149) The effects of a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet on markers of uterine contractility during parturition in the rat by Elmes MJ1, Tan DS, Cheng Z, Wathes DC, McMullen S.(PubMed)
(150) Thioacetamide-induced liver injury: protective role of genistein by Saleh DO1, Abdel Jaleel GA, El-Awdan SA, Oraby F, Badawi M.(PubMed)
(151) Reproductive hormones in plasma over the menstrual cycle in primarydysmenorrhea compared with healthy subjects by Liedman R1, Hansson SR, Howe D, Igidbashian S, McLeod A, Russell RJ, Akerlund M.(PubMed)
(152) Overfeeding polyunsaturated and saturated fat causes distinct effects on liver and visceral fat accumulation in humans. Rosqvist F1, Iggman D2, Kullberg J3, Cedernaes J4, Johansson HE1, Larsson A5, Johansson L6, Ahlström H3, Arner P7, Dahlman I7, Risérus U8 .(PubMed)
(153) The effects of a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet on markers of uterine contractility during parturition in the rat by Elmes MJ1, Tan DS, Cheng Z, Wathes DC, McMullen S.(PubMed)
(154) Reproductive hormones in plasma over the menstrual cycle in primarydysmenorrhea compared with healthy subjects by Liedman R1, Hansson SR, Howe D, Igidbashian S, McLeod A, Russell RJ, Akerlund M.(PubMed)
(155) The effects of prostaglandin E1 and prostaglandin E2 on in vitro myometrial contractility and uterine structure by Chiossi G1, Costantine MM, Bytautiene E, Kechichian T, Hankins GD, Sbrana E, Saade GR, Longo M.(PubMed)
(156) Physiology and pharmacology of prostaglandins by Konturek SJ, Pawlik W.(PubMed)
(157) Characterization of an arachidonic acid-deficient (Fads1 knockout) mouse model by Fan YY1, Monk JM, Hou TY, Callway E, Vincent L, Weeks B, Yang P, Chapkin RS.(PubMed)
(158) Contribution of meat fat to dietary arachidonic acid by Li D1, Ng A, Mann NJ, Sinclair AJ.(PubMed)
(159) [Imbalance of blood flow induced by sympathetic block was corrected byprostaglandin E1].[Article in Japanese by Okuda Y1, Kitajima T.(PubMed)
(160) Clinical use of misoprostol in nonpregnant women: review article by Choksuchat C.(PubMed)
(161) The Evidence for α-Linolenic Acid and Cardiovascular Disease Benefits: Comparisons with Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid by Fleming JA1, Kris-Etherton PM2.(PubMed)
(162) Dietary fatty acids and inflammatory markers in patients with coronary artery disease by Niknam M1, Paknahad Z2, Maracy MR3, Hashemi M4.(PubMed)
(163) Fishy business: effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells by De Mel D1, Suphioglu C2.(PubMed)
(164) Influence of intermittent fasting and high-fat diet on morphological changes of the digestive system and on changes of lipid metabolism in the laboratory mouse by Krízová E1, Simek V.(PubMed)
(165) Effect of a high saturated fat and no-starch diet on serum lipid subfractions in patients with documented atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by Hays JH1, DiSabatino A, Gorman RT, Vincent S, Stillabower ME.(PubMed)
(166) Ultrafine Angelica gigas powder normalizes ovarian hormone levels and has antiosteoporosis properties in ovariectomized rats: particle size effect by Choi KO1, Lee I, Paik SY, Kim DE, Lim JD, Kang WS, Ko S.(PubMed)
(167) Analgesic effect and mechanism of the three TCM-herbal drug-combination Tou Feng Yu pill on treatment of migraine by Li JC1, Shen XF, Meng XL, Zhang Y, Lai XR.(PubMed)
(168) Chinese Angelica Root(Eastern medicine export company)
(169) Immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharide isolated from Angelicasinensis by Yang T1, Jia M, Meng J, Wu H, Mei Q.(PubMed)
(170) [Therapeutic effect of Astragalus and Angelica on renal injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion in rats].[Article in Chinese] by Sheng MX1, Li JZ, Wang HY.(PubMed)
(171) [Adjustment effect of Radix Astragalus and Radix Angelicae sinensis on TNF-alpha and bFGF on renal injury induced by ischemia reperfusion in rabbit].[Article in Chinese] by Xu XY1, Li LH, Wu LS, Zhao CL, Lin HY.(PubMed)
(172) Water-soluble polysaccharides from Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels: Preparation, characterization and bioactivity by Sun Y1, Tang J, Gu X, Li D.(PubMed)
(173) [Structural analysis and anti-tumor activity in vivo of polysaccharide APS-2a from Angelica sinensis].[Article in Chinese] by Cao W1, Li XQ, Hou Y, Fan HT, Zhang XN, Mei QB.(PubMed)
(174) Experimental study of anti-tumor effects of polysaccharides from Angelicasinensis by Shang P1, Qian AR, Yang TH, Jia M, Mei QB, Cho CH, Zhao WM, Chen ZN.(PubMed)
(175) Effect of Angelica sinensis Polysaccharides on Osteoarthritis In Vivo and In Vitro: A Possible Mechanism to Promote Proteoglycans Synthesis by Qin J1, Liu YS, Liu J, Li J, Tan Y, Li XJ, Magdalou J, Mei QB, Wang H, Chen LB.(PubMed)
(176) Angelica Sinensis polysaccharides stimulated UDP-sugar synthase genes through promoting gene expression of IGF-1 and IGF1R in chondrocytes: promoting anti-osteoarthritic activity by Wen Y1, Li J2, Tan Y1, Qin J1, Xie X2, Wang L1, Mei Q3, Wang H4, Magdalou J5, Chen L6.(PubMed)
(177)Synergistic Action of Flavonoids, Baicalein, and Daidzein in Estrogenicand Neuroprotective Effects: A Development of Potential Health Products and Therapeutic Drugs against Alzheimer's Disease by Choi RC1, Zhu JT, Yung AW, Lee PS, Xu SL, Guo AJ, Zhu KY, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(178) Flavonoids possess neuroprotective effects on cultured pheochromocytoma PC12 cells: a comparison of different flavonoids in activating estrogenic effect and in preventing beta-amyloid-induced cell death by Zhu JT1, Choi RC, Chu GK, Cheung AW, Gao QT, Li J, Jiang ZY, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(179) Isoflavones: chemistry, analysis, functions and effects on health and cancer by Ko KP.(PubMed)
(180) Modulation of HER2 expression by ferulic acid on human breast cancer MCF7 cells by Chang CJ1, Chiu JH, Tseng LM, Chang CH, Chien TM, Wu CW, Lui WY.(PubMed)
(181) Traditional chinese medicine for senile dementia by Lin Z1, Gu J, Xiu J, Mi T, Dong J, Tiwari JK.(PubMed)
(182)Medicinal plants as alternative treatments for female sexual dysfunction: utopian vision or possible treatment in climacteric women? by Mazaro-Costa R1, Andersen ML, Hachul H, Tufik S.(PubMed)
(183) The immediate effect of natural plant extract, Angelica sinensis and Matricaria chamomilla (Climex) for the treatment of hot flushes duringmenopause. A preliminary report by Kupfersztain C1, Rotem C, Fagot R, Kaplan B.(PubMed)
(184) Hemopoietic effect of extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in rats by Lee HW1, Kim H1, Ryuk JA1, Kil KJ2, Ko BS1.(PubMed)
(185) Characterization of the anti-influenza activity of the Chinese herbal plantPaeonia lactiflora by Ho JY1, Chang HW2, Lin CF3, Liu CJ4, Hsieh CF5, Horng JT6(PubMed)
(186) Anti-viral activity of water extract of Paeonia lactiflora pallas against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines by Lin TJ1, Wang KC, Lin CC, Chiang LC, Chang JS.(PubMed)
(188) Paeoniflorin inhibited the tumor invasion and metastasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by Lu JT, He W, Song SS, Wei W.(PubMed)
(189) Paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via a TLR4-dependent pathway by Zhang J1, Dou W, Zhang E, Sun A, Ding L, Wei X, Chou G, Mani S, Wang Z.(PubMed)
(190) The anti-inflammatory effect of paeoniflorin on cerebral infarction induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury in Sprague-Dawley rats by Tang NY1, Liu CH, Hsieh CT, Hsieh CL.(PubMed)
(191) Triglyceride accumulation: inhibitory effects of tangzhiqing formula by An Y1, Liu X, Qian Q, Zhang D, Li Y, Gao X, Zhang Y, Wang T.(PubMed)
(192) Paeoniflorin regulates macrophage activation in dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis in rats by Chen X1, Liu C, Lu Y, Yang Z, Lv Z, Xu Q, Pan Q, Lu L.(PubMed)
(193) [Effects of total glucosides of paeony on enhancing insulin sensitivity and antagonizing nonalcoholic fatty liver in rats].[Article in Chinese] by Zheng LY1, Pan JQ, Lv JH.(PubMed)
(194) Wound-healing plants from TCM: in vitro investigations on selected TCM plants and their influence on human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes by Wang R1, Lechtenberg M, Sendker J, Petereit F, Deters A, Hensel A.(PubMed)
(195) Anxiolytic-like effect of paeonol in mice by Mi XJ1, Chen SW, Wang WJ, Wang R, Zhang YJ, Li WJ, Li YL.(PubMed)
(196) Water extract of Spatholobus suberectus inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by Hyunil Ha,1 Ki-Shuk Shim,1 Hyosun An,1 Taesoo Kim,1 and Jin Yeul Ma(PubMed)
(197) Spatholobus suberectus inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing apoptosis and arresting cell cycle at G2/M checkpoint by Wang ZY1, Wang DM, Loo TY, Cheng Y, Chen LL, Shen JG, Yang DP, Chow LW, Guan XY, Chen JP.(PubMed)
(198) Bioactivity-guided identification and cell signaling technology to delineate the lactate dehydrogenase A inhibition effects of Spatholobus suberectus on breast cancer by Wang Z1, Wang D, Han S, Wang N, Mo F, Loo TY, Shen J, Huang H, Chen J.(PubMed)
(199) A lectin from Spatholobus parviflorus inhibits Aspergillus flavus α-amylase: enzyme kinetics and thermodynamic studies by Tintu I1, Abhilash J, Dileep KV, Augustine A, Haridas M, Sadasivan C.(PubMed)
(200) Characterization of total phenolic constituents from the stems ofSpatholobus suberectus using LC-DAD-MS(n) and their inhibitory effect on human neutrophil elastase activity by Huang Y1, Chen L, Feng L, Guo F, Li Y.(PubMed)
(201) Neuroprotective effects of formononetin against NMDA-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons by Tian Z1, Liu SB, Wang YC, Li XQ, Zheng LH, Zhao MG.(PubMed)
(202) Antiplatelet effects of Spatholobus suberectus via inhibition of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor by Lee BJ1, Jo IY, Bu Y, Park JW, Maeng S, Kang H, Jang W, Hwang DS, Lee W, Min K, Kim JI, Yoo HH, Lew JH.(PubMed)
(203) [Clinical observation of treating 62 patients with severe aplastic anemia failing in immunosuppressive therapy by integrative medicine].[Article in Chinese]by Su EY1, Fang YH, Chen HS.(PubMed)
(204) Backache and Chinese herbs(traditional Chinese medicine)
(205) Observation on the effects of Chinese medicine zhenxuanyin for improving cerebral blood flow in rats with cerebral ischemia by Jingyi W1, Yasuhiro M, Naoya H, Seok RC, Yoshiharu Y, Nagara T, Fumiko T, Shigeru M, Junji K.(PubMed)
(206) [Clinical and experimental study of Ligusticum wallichii and aspirin in the treatment of transient ischemic attack].[Article in Chinese] by Chen DR.(PubMed)
(207) Ligusticum wallichi (Chuan Xiong)(TCMWiki)
(208)Endothelium-independent vasorelaxation by Ligusticum wallichii in isolated rat aorta: comparison of a butanolic fraction and tetramethylpyrazine, the main active component of Ligusticum wallichii by Kim EY1, Kim JH, Rhyu MR.(PubMed)
(209) Ligusticum wallichii Extract Inhibited the Expression of IL-1β after AMI in Rat by Zhuo Yuan, 1 Junping Zhang, 1 ,* and Cui Yang(PubMed)
(210) Neuroprotective effects of tetramethylpyrazine against dopaminergic neuron injury in a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by MPTP by Lu C1, Zhang J2, Shi X3, Miao S1, Bi L1, Zhang S4, Yang Q1, Zhou X1, Zhang M1, Xie Y1, Miao Q1, Wang S1.(PubMed)
(211) Study on anti-atherosclerotic effect of Suxiao Jiuxin Pill and its mechanism by Guo QX, Zhang J, Li YQ, Zhang GF.(PubMed)
(212) Ligustrazine attenuates elevated levels of indoxyl sulfate, kidney injury molecule-1 and clusterin in rats exposed to cadmium by Lan Z1, Bi KS1, Chen XH2.(PubMed)
(213) Prevention of inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity by butylidenephthalide and its role in microglial activation by Nam KN1, Kim KP, Cho KH, Jung WS, Park JM, Cho SY, Park SK, Park TH, Kim YS, Lee EH.(PubMed)
(214) Polyphenols and neuroprotection against ischemia and neurodegeneration by Lin B.(PubMed)
(215) Effect of Ligusticum wallichii aqueous extract on oxidative injury and immunity activity in myocardial ischemic reperfusion rats by Zengyong Q1, Jiangwei M, Huajin L.(PubMed)
(216) Protective effects and mechanism of tetramethylpyrazine against lens opacification induced by sodium selenite in rats by Li N1, Zhu Y, Deng X, Gao Y, Zhu Y, He M.(PubMed)
(217) Selection of component drug in activating blood flow and removing bloodstasis of Chinese herbal medicinal formula for dairy cow mastitis by hemorheological method by Lu Y1, Hu YL, Kong XF, Wang DY.(PubMed)
(218)The development of nao li shen and its clinical application by Lu SL1, Liu X, Wang JL, Ying Q, Hu SG, Hu PP, Zhu GP, Zhen HW, Bai YT, Wang Q.(PubMed)
craniocerebral injury), degeneration of spinal disks in the neck (cervical spondylosis) and brain dysfunctions related to disease of the blood vessels (cerebrovascular diseases)
(219) Effects of huoxue injection on the adherence of human monocytes to endothelial cells and expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules].[Article in Chinese]by Zhu LQ1, Wang SR, Qin Y.(PubMed)
(220) Tanshinone IIA exhibits anticonvulsant activity in zebrafish and mouse seizure models by Buenafe OE1, Orellana-Paucar A, Maes J, Huang H, Ying X, De Borggraeve W, Crawford AD, Luyten W, Esguerra CV, de Witte P.(PubMed)
(221) Neuroprotective effects of tanshinones in transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice by Lam BY1, Lo AC, Sun X, Luo HW, Chung SK, Sucher NJ.(PubMed)
(222) [Study of xiaozhang recipe combined with lamivudine in treatment of 84 chronic viral hepatitis B patients with compensated liver cirrhosis][Article in Chinese] by Zhou ZH1, Li M, Huang LY.(PubMed)
(223) [Effect of lixu jieyu recipe in treating 75 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome].[Article in Chinese]
by Zhang ZX1, Wu LL, Chen M.(PubMed)
(224) [Clinical observation on ziyin tongbi decoction in treating benign prostatic hyperplasia][Article in Chinese] by Guo J1, Song CS, Han Q.(PubMed)
(225) Vodka and wine consumption in a swine model of metabolic syndrome alters insulin signaling pathways in the liver and skeletal muscle. Elmadhun NY1, Lassaletta AD, Chu LM, Bianchi C, Sellke FW.(PubMed)
(226) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estrogen
(227) Influence of blood vessel on the thermal lesion formation during radiofrequency ablation for liver tumors by Huang HW1.(PubMed)
(228) GI training: a model for the future? by Mayberry M, Mayberry J.(PubMed)
(229) [Effects of jingqianshu granule on expression of estrogen receptor alpha and beta mRNA in hypothalamus and hippocampus of PMS rats with liver-qi depression].
[Article in Chinese] by Zhang H1, Ma J.(PubMed)

(230) Dang Gui (Chinese Angelica Root) - Chinese Herbal Medicine
(231) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21315572
(232)Synergistic Action of Flavonoids, Baicalein, and Daidzein in Estrogenicand Neuroprotective Effects: A Development of Potential Health Products and Therapeutic Drugs against Alzheimer's Disease by Choi RC1, Zhu JT, Yung AW, Lee PS, Xu SL, Guo AJ, Zhu KY, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(233) Flavonoids possess neuroprotective effects on cultured pheochromocytoma PC12 cells: a comparison of different flavonoids in activating estrogenic effect and in preventing beta-amyloid-induced cell death by Zhu JT1, Choi RC, Chu GK, Cheung AW, Gao QT, Li J, Jiang ZY, Dong TT, Tsim KW.(PubMed)
(234) Isoflavones: chemistry, analysis, functions and effects on health and cancer by Ko KP.(PubMed)
(235) Ethanol extract of Angelica gigas inhibits croton oil-induced inflammation by suppressing the cyclooxygenase - prostaglandin pathway by Shin S1, Joo SS, Park D, Jeon JH, Kim TK, Kim JS, Park SK, Hwang BY, Kim YB.(PubMed)
(236) Inhibitory effects of furanocoumarins isolated from the roots of Angelica dahurica on prostaglandin E2 production by Ban HS1, Lim SS, Suzuki K, Jung SH, Lee S, Lee YS, Shin KH, Ohuchi K.(PubMed)
(237) [Effects of different concentration extract from shenghua decoction on contractile activity of the uterine smooth muscle isolated from normal, estrogen-treated and postpartum mice].[Article in Chinese] by Zhao D1, Zhan WH, Li LH, Nie FZ, Jiao JJ, Lu Y.(PubMed)
(238) [Dysmenorrhea: a study of affected factors and approaches to relief among female students at a college in southern Taiwan].[Article in Chinese] by Chen CK1, Huang YP, Fang HL, Huang YY.(PubMed)
(239) "Whole Chinese angelica" microemulsion: its preparation and in vivo and in vitro evaluations. by Du H1, Feng Q, Yang X, Xu R, Li H, Dong X, Zhu Q, Wang D, Lu X, Niu X.(PubMed)
(240) Milk thistle in liver diseases: past, present, future. by Abenavoli L1, Capasso R, Milic N, Capasso F.(PubMed)
(241) [Analysis on content of serum monoamine neurotransmitters in macaques with anger-in-induced premenstrual syndrome and liver-qi depression syndrome].[Article in Chinese] by Wei S1, Hou JL, Chao YB, Du XY, Zong SB.(PubMed)
(242) [Treatment of premenstrual syndrome with Chinese medicine formula, baixiangdan capsule: implications for neuron viability and GABA(A) receptor modulation in rat cortex].[Article in Chinese] by Sun S1, Qiao M, Zhang H.(PubMed)
(243) Hemopoietic effect of extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in rats by Lee HW1, Kim H1, Ryuk JA1, Kil KJ2, Ko BS1.(PubMed)
(244) Characterization of the anti-influenza activity of the Chinese herbal plantPaeonia lactiflora by Ho JY1, Chang HW2, Lin CF3, Liu CJ4, Hsieh CF5, Horng JT6(PubMed)
(245) Anti-viral activity of water extract of Paeonia lactiflora pallas against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines by Lin TJ1, Wang KC, Lin CC, Chiang LC, Chang JS.(PubMed)
(246) Anxiolytic-like effect of paeonol in mice by Mi XJ1, Chen SW, Wang WJ, Wang R, Zhang YJ, Li WJ, Li YL.(PubMed
(247) The correlation between neurosteroids and neurotransmitters with liver yang rising and liver qi stagnation types of premenstrual syndrome by Gao H1, Shang YZ, Xia T, Qiao MQ, Zhang HY, Ma YX.(PubMed)
(248) The effect of fennel (Foeniculum Vulgare) seed oil emulsion in infantile colic: a randomized, placebo-controlled study. by Alexandrovich I1, Rakovitskaya O, Kolmo E, Sidorova T, Shushunov S.(PubMed)
(249) Ameliorating effect of various fractions of Rumex hastatus roots against hepato- and testicular toxicity caused by CCl4 by Sahreen S1, Khan MR, Khan RA.(PubMed)
(250) Protective effect of Rumex patientia (English Spinach) roots on ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced hepatic oxidative stress and tumor promotion response by Lone IA1, Kaur G, Athar M, Alam MS.(PubMed)
(251) Direct moxibustion to treat spleen qi and yang deficiency fatigue: a pilot study. by Thorne TL1, Hanes DA2, Wild H3, Colbert A4.(PubMed)
(252) Kidney Yang Deficiency(Ageless herbs)
(253) [Methods and evaluations on the sterioid-induced osteoporosis mice model with the type of Kidney-Yin deficiency].[Article in Chinese] by Xia BJ, Tong PJ, Sun Y, Zhou LY, Jin HT.(PubMed)
(254) Effects of Liuwei Dihuang Granule ([symbols; see text]) on the outcomes of in vitro fertilization pre-embryo transfer in infertility women with Kidney-yin deficiency syndrome and the proteome expressions in the follicular fluid. by Lian F1, Wu HC, Sun ZG, Guo Y, Shi L, Xue MY.(PubMed)
(255) [Diphasic regulatory effect of lishen injection on sex hormones in senile female patients with coronary heart disease of kidney deficiency type].[Article in Chinese] by Qiu RX1, Jin MH, Wu GZ.(PubMed)
(256) Rehmannia glutinose ameliorates renal function in the ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure rats by Kang DG1, Sohn EJ, Moon MK, Lee YM, Lee HS.(PubMed)
(257) Determination and comparison of mineral elements in traditional Chinese herbal formulae at different decoction times used to improve kidney function--chemometric approach by Kolasani A1, Xu H, Millikan M.(PubMed)
(258) The protective effect of Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Fang in salt-sensitive hypertension rats bny Yang Q1, He Y, Wang W.(PubMed)
(259) Oriental medicine Kyung-Ok-Ko prevents and alleviates dehydroepiandrosterone-induced polycystic ovarian syndrome in rats by Jang M1, Lee MJ1, Lee JM2, Bae CS3, Kim SH4, Ryu JH5, Cho IH6.(PubMed)
(260) Antispasmodic and vasodilator activities of Morinda citrifolia root extract are mediated through blockade of voltage dependent calcium channels by Gilani AH1, Mandukhail SU, Iqbal J, Yasinzai M, Aziz N, Khan A, Najeeb-ur-Rehman.(PubMed)
(261) Antinociceptive anti-inflammatory effect of Monotropein isolated from the root of Morinda officinalis. by Choi J1, Lee KT, Choi MY, Nam JH, Jung HJ, Park SK, Park HJ.(PubMed)
(262) Do the health claims made for Morinda citrifolia (Noni) harmonize with current scientific knowledge and evaluation of its biological effects by Gupta RK1, Patel AK.(PubMed)
(263) Pregnancy in premature ovarian failure after therapy using Chinese herbal medicine by Chao SL1, Huang LW, Yen HR.(PubMed)
(264) Effect of Cuscuta chinensis on renal function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure rats by Shin S1, Lee YJ, Kim EJ, Lee AS, Kang DG, Lee HS.(PubMed)
(265) Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Cuscuta chinensis seeds in mice by Liao JC1, Chang WT, Lee MS, Chiu YJ, Chao WK, Lin YC, Lin MK, Peng WH.(PubMed)
(266) The total flavones from Semen cuscutae reverse the reduction of testosterone level and the expression of androgen receptor gene in kidney-yang deficient mice by Yang J1, Wang Y, Bao Y, Guo J.(PubMed)
(267) Neuroprotective effect of a chuk-me-sun-dan on neurons from ischemic damage and neuronal cell toxicity by Chung TW1, Koo BS, Choi EG, Kim MG, Lee IS, Kim CH.(PubMed)
(268) Identification and quantitation of the ingredients in a counterfeit Vietnamese herbal medicine against rheumatic diseases by Wiest J1, Schollmayer C1, Gresser G2, Holzgrabe U3.(PubMed)
(269) Cyclical changes in calcium metabolism across the menstrual cycle in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Thys-Jacobs S1, McMahon D, Bilezikian JP.(PubMed)
(270) Lower insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Thys-Jacobs S1, McMahon D, Bilezikian JP.(PubMed)
(271) Magnesium (mg) retention and mood effects after intravenous mg infusion in premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Khine K1, Rosenstein DL, Elin RJ, Niemela JE, Schmidt PJ, Rubinow DR.(PubMed)
(272) [Role of magnesium in the pathogenesis of premenstrual disorders].[Article in Ukrainian] by Ventskivs'ka IB, Senchuk AIa.(PubMed)
(273) Premenstrual syndrome: a psychological overview by Riven L.(PubMed)
(274) Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and the premenstrual syndrome: a randomized crossover trial by Doll H1, Brown S, Thurston A, Vessey M.(PubMed)
(275) The effects of vitamin B6 supplementation on premenstrual symptoms. by Kendall KE, Schnurr PP.(PubMed)
(276) Effects of vitamin B6 deficiency on the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin by Shibata K1, Mushiage M, Kondo T, Hayakawa T, Tsuge H.(PubMed)
(277) Tryptophan(Wikipedia)
(278) The serotonin-N-acetylserotonin-melatonin pathway as a biomarker for autism spectrum disorders by Pagan C1, Delorme R2, Callebert J3, Goubran-Botros H4, Amsellem F5, Drouot X6, Boudebesse C7, Le Dudal K8, Ngo-Nguyen N9, Laouamri H9, Gillberg C10,Leboyer M7, Bourgeron T11, Launay JM12.(PubMed)
(279) Melatonin therapy for REM sleep behavior disorder: a critical review of evidence by McGrane IR1, Leung JG2, St Louis EK3, Boeve BF3(PubMed)
(280) Abnormal secretion of melatonin and cortisol in relation to sleep disturbances in children with Williams syndrome by Sniecinska-Cooper AM1, Iles RK2, Butler SA1, Jones H1, Bayford R3, Dimitriou D4.(PubMed)
(281) Effect of alcohol abuse and glutathione administration on the circulating levels of glutathione and on antipyrine metabolism in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis by Loguercio C1, Piscopo P, Guerriero C, De Girolamo V, Disalvo D, Del Vecchio Blanco C.(PubMed)
(282) [Alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, anxiety and depression among second-year medical students. Identify in order to act].[Article in French] by Vaysse B, Gignon M, Zerkly S, Ganry O.(PubMed)
(283) Autophagy and ethanol neurotoxicity. by Luo J1.(PubMed)
(284) The use of conventional and complementary therapies for insomnia among Hong Kong Chinese: a telephone survey by Yeung WF1, Chung KF2, Yung KP3, Ho FY3, Ho LM4, Yu YM3, Kwok CW3.(PubMed)
(285) An evidence-based review of insomnia treatment in early recovery by Kaplan KA1, McQuaid J, Primich C, Rosenlicht N.(PubMed)
(286) Post-study caffeine administration enhances memory consolidation in humans by Borota D1, Murray E1, Keceli G2, Chang A1, Watabe JM1, Ly M1, Toscano JP2, Yassa MA3.(PubMed)
(287) Chronic caffeine consumption prevents memory disturbance in different animal models of memory decline by Cunha RA1, Agostinho PM.(PubMed)
(288) Central nervous system effects of caffeine and adenosine on fatigue by Davis JM1, Zhao Z, Stock HS, Mehl KA, Buggy J, Hand GA.(PubMed)
(289) Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects by Nehlig A1, Daval JL, Debry G.(PubMed)
(290) Autonomic nervous system effects of acute doses of caffeine in caffeine users and abstainers by Zahn TP, Rapoport JL.(PubMed)
(291) Relationship between plasma total homocysteine level and dietary caffeine and vitamin B6 intakes in pregnant women by Shiraishi M1, Haruna M, Matsuzaki M, Ota E, Murayama R, Sasaki S, Yeo S, Murashima S.(PubMed)
(292) Pilot investigation of the circadian plasma melatonin rhythm across the menstrual cycle in a small group of women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder by Shechter A1, Lespérance P, Ng Ying Kin NM, Boivin DB.(PubMed)
(293) Insomnia increases insulin resistance and insulin secretion in elderly people by Yamamoto N, Yamanaka G, Ishizawa K, Ishikawa M, Murakami S, Yamanaka T, Okumiya K, Ishine M, Matsubayashi K, Otsuka K.(PubMed)
(294) Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders. by Depner CM1, Stothard ER, Wright KP Jr.(PubMed)
(295) Insulin resistance to both glucose and aminoacid metabolism in a patient with Fatal Familial Insomnia by Benedini S, Cortelli P, Caumo A, Terruzzi I, Beelke M, Perseghin G, Montagna P, Lugaresi E, Luzi L.(PubMed
(296) Perimenstrual headache: migraine without aura or premenstrual syndromesymptom? by Sundić A1, Zidverc-Trajković J, Vujović S, Sternić N.(PubMed)
(297) Symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and their association with migraine headache by Martin VT1, Wernke S, Mandell K, Ramadan N, Kao L, Bean J, Liu J, Zoma W, Rebar R.(PubMed)
(298) Relief of menstrual symptoms and migraine with a single-tablet formulation of sumatriptan and naproxen sodium by Martin VT1, Ballard J, Diamond MP, Mannix LK, Derosier FJ, Lener SE, Krishen A, McDonald SA.(PubMed)
(299) Sumatriptan-naproxen sodium for menstrual migraine and dysmenorrhea: satisfaction, productivity, and functional disability outcomesby Cady RK1, Diamond ML, Diamond MP, Ballard JE, Lener ME, Dorner DP, Derosier FJ, McDonald SA, White J, Runken MC.(PubMed)
(300) Colocalization of dopamine and serotonin in the rat pituitary gland and in the nuclei innervating it by Vanhatalo S1, Soinila S, Kaartinen K, Bäck N.(PubMed)
(301) Stress, serotonin, and hippocampal neurogenesis in relation to depression and antidepressant effects by Mahar I1, Bambico FR2, Mechawar N3, Nobrega JN4.(PubMed)
(302) Serotonin receptor ligands: treatments of acute migraine and clusterheadache by Goadsby PJ.(PubMed)
(303) Sumatriptan: a new serotonin agonist for the treatment of migraine headache by Susman JL.(PubMed)
(304) Brain serotonin, psychoactive drugs, and effects on reproduction by Ayala ME.(PubMed)
(305) Chronic migraine with medication overuse: Association between disability and quality of life measures, and impact of disease on patients' lives by Raggi A1, Schiavolin S2, Leonardi M2, Giovannetti AM2, Bussone G3, Curone M3, Di Fiore P3, Grazzi L3, Usai S3, D'Amico D3.(PubMed)
(306) Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, increases growth hormone secretion in a patient with acromegaly by Arihara Z1, Sakurai K, Yamashita R, Niitsuma S, Ueno T, Yamamura N, Yamada S, Inoshita N, Takahashi K.(PubMed)
(307) Prevention of breast pain and milk secretion with bromocriptine after second-trimester abortion by Nyboe Andersen A1, Damm P, Tabor A, Pedersen IM, Harring M.(PubMed)
(308) http://www.patient.co.uk/medicine/Bromocriptine.htm
(309) Modest changes in dietary intake across the menstrual cycle: implications for food intake research by Bryant M1, Truesdale KP, Dye L.(PubMed)
(310) Atopic disorders are more common in childhood migraine and correlatedheadache phenotype by Ozge A1, Oksüz N, Ayta S, Uluduz D, Yıldırım V, Toros F, Taşdelen B.(PubMed)
(311) Magnesium in disease prevention and overall health by Volpe SL.(PubMed)
(312) SERUM magnesium levels as an indicator of status of Diabetes Mellitus type 2 by Ramadass S1, Basu S2, Srinivasan AR3.(PubMed)
(313) Effect of magnesium sulfate on blood sugar levels of diabetic children by Ozsoylu S.(PubMed)
(314) The preventive effect of magnesium on coronary spasm in patients with vasospastic angina by Teragawa H1, Kato M, Yamagata T, Matsuura H, Kajiyama G.(PubMed)
(315) Susceptibility-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography during migraine attack: a case report by Shimoda Y1, Kudo K, Kuroda S, Zaitsu Y, Fujima N, Terae S, Sasaki M, Houkin K.(PubMed)
(316) Caffeine restriction as initial treatment for breast pain by Russell LC1.(PubMed)
(317) Prospective study of "fibrocystic breast disease" and caffeine consumption. by Heyden S, Muhlbaier LH.(PubMed)
(318) Fibrocystic breast disease by Scott EB1.(PubMed)
(319) Caffeine and premenstrual syndrome by J W Phillis(PMC)
(320) The effect of decreased caffeine consumption on benign proliferative breast disease: a randomized clinical trial by Allen SS, Froberg DG.(PubMed)
(321) Premenstrual syndrome by Dickerson LM1, Mazyck PJ, Hunter MH.(PubMed)
(322) Stress biomarkers as predictors of transition to psychosis in at-risk mental states: roles for cortisol, prolactin and albumin by Labad J1, Stojanovic-Pérez A2, Montalvo I3, Solé M2, Cabezas Á2, Ortega L2, Moreno I2, Vilella E2, Martorell L2, Reynolds RM4, Gutiérrez-Zotes A2.(PubMed)
(323) Transgenerational effects of social stress on social behavior, corticosterone, oxytocin, and prolactin in rats by Babb JA1, Carini LM1, Spears SL1, Nephew BC2.(PubMed)
(324) Association of serum prolactin and oxytocin with milk production in mothers of preterm and term infants by Hill PD1, Aldag JC, Demirtas H, Naeem V, Parker NP, Zinaman MJ, Chatterton RT. Jr.(PubMed)  
(325) Common breast problems by Salzman B1, Fleegle S, Tully AS.(PubMed)
(326) A randomised controlled trial of medroxyprogesterone acetate in mastalgia. by Maddox PR1, Harrison BJ, Horobin JM, Walker K, Mansel RE, Preece PE, Nicholson RI.(PubMed)
(327) Bromocriptine (Bromergon, Lek) in the management of premenstrual syndrome by Meden-Vrtovec H1, Vujić D.(PubMed)
(328) Physiologic changes in breast magnetic resonance imaging during the menstrual cycle: perfusion imaging, signal enhancement, and influence of the T1 relaxation time of breast tissue by Delille JP1, Slanetz PJ, Yeh ED, Kopans DB, Garrido L.(PubMed)
(329) [Benign breast diseases: hormonal studies in 125 cases (author's transl)].[Article in French] by Mauvais-Jarvis P, Kuttenn F, Mowszowicz I, Sitruk-Ware R.(PubMed)
(330) Effect of epinephrine on glucose metabolism in humans: contribution of the liver by Sherwin RS, Saccà L.(PubMed)
(331) Liver lipid metabolism. by Nguyen P1, Leray V, Diez M, Serisier S, Le Bloc'h J, Siliart B, Dumon H.(PubMed)
(332) Protein metabolism and liver disease by Charlton MR1.(PubMed)
(333) Fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue, muscle and liver in health and disease by Frayn KN1, Arner P, Yki-Järvinen H.(PubMed)
(334) Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and eicosanoids in human health and pathologies by Tapiero H1, Ba GN, Couvreur P, Tew KD.(PubMed)
(335) Effect of prostaglandin E2 on puerperal breast discomfort and prolactin secretion by Tulandi T, Gelfand MM, Maiolo L.(PubMed)
(336) Impairment of uterine smooth muscle contractions and prostaglandin secretion from cattle myometrium and corpus luteum in vitro is influenced by DDT, DDE and HCH by Wrobel MH1, Bedziechowski P1, Mlynarczuk J1, Kotwica J2.(PubMed)
(337) Micronutrients and the premenstrual syndrome: the case for calcium by Thys-Jacobs S1.(PubMed)
(338) Micronutrients in women's health and immune function by Bendich A1.(PubMed)
(339) Vitamin and trace element status in premenstrual syndrome by Mira M1, Stewart PM, Abraham SF.(PubMed)
(340) Dietary linoleic acid, immune inhibition and disease by Sammon AM1.(PubMed)

No comments:

Post a Comment