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Saturday, June 15, 2019

Herbal Bilberry Normalizes the Blood Glucose in Diabetics

Hyperglycemia is a condition of abnormally high blood glucose associated with the elevated risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

In other words, overexpression of blood cholesterol is one the condition of metabolic syndrome cluster involved diabetic complications.

Long-term untreated and unmanaged hyperglycemia was found to induce kidney damage or kidney failure in diabetes.

Some researchers suggested that long-term untreated and unmanaged hyperglycemia was associated with severe damage to the blood vessels of the retina, potentially leading to blindness and wounds such as on the leg that can not be healed.

On the other hand, hypoglycemia is a condition caused by abnormally low levels of blood glucose. Most cases of acute hypoglycemia in healthy individuals is a result of hunger due to the miss of the meal.

In diabetes, the condition may be caused by overdoses of insulin injection or medications. In some cases, hypoglycemia may be caused by a diabetic person who doesn't eat as much food as usual after taking diabetes medication.

Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include dizziness, nausea, cold sweats, a fast heart rate, confusion, headache, irritability, coma, and possibly even death, depending on the levels of blood glucose.

Bilberry is a species of low-growing shrubs in the genus Vaccinium, belonging to the family Ericaceae, native to Northern Europe.


The plant has been used as herbs in traditional medicine for the treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea, gastritis, gastric ulcer, and duodenal ulcer, enterocolitis, ulcerative colitis, anemia, cystitis, kidney disease, and psoriasis, diabetes, etc.

Searching in a list of natural ingredients for the treatment of hyperglycemia, scientists investigated the bilberry's polyphenolic compounds on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Wistar rats with streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced diabetes.

In the comparison of the Vaccinium myrtillus L. (bilberry) leaf (VLE) and Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed coat (PCE) plant extracts effects on hypoglycemic properties, male Wistar rats with STZ and HFD-induced diabetes selected to the study were fed with or without VLE or PCE for 50 d.


According to the blood sample collected, the injection of VLE showed a significantly ameliorative effect of on carbohydrate metabolism in diabetic rats.

Futhermore, administration of VLE in diabetic animals normalized the HbA levels in 4 out of 8 treatment rats.

Moreover, the VLE treatment group also displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose level by 50% compared with the control of diabetic rats.

Compared to the PLE treatment group, VLE and PLE groups showed an antioxidant effect on diene compounds in the blood serum of rats.

The findings suggested that VLE exerts potential anti hypoglycemia probably through enhancing the antioxidant enzymes produced by the host rats.

In order to find more information about bilberry antihyperglycemic activity and confirm the use of bilberry traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes, researchers investigate the effects of bilberry against DM.


Selected animals in the study induced diabetes by the intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (120 mg kg(-1) body weight (BW))were treated by Bilberry powder (2 g d(-1)) or glibenclamide (positive control; 0.6 mg kg(-1) BW) for 4 weeks following alloxan injection.

Bilberry supplementation injection resulted in a significant reduction of glucose compared to diabetic control and glibenclamide.

Additionally, bilberry demonstrated strong activity against symptoms of diabetes by elevating the levels of insulin, reducing TC, LDL-C, VLDL-C and TG levels, and preventing the decline of HDL-C.

However, the levels of CRP in the expression of inflammation did not significantly change with either bilberry or glibenclamide.


Dr. the lead scientist said, "Dietary supplementation with bilberry fruits may protect against impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in DM".

Taken altogether, bilberry may be considered a functional food for the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperglycemic complications of diabetes, pending to the further confirmation of larger sample size and multicenter human study.

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Author Biography
Kyle J. Norton (Scholar, Master of Nutrition, All right reserved)

Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published online, including worldwide health, ezine articles, article base, health blogs, self-growth, best before it's news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada - Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bioscience, ISSN 0975-6299.

References
(1) Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of Vaccinium myrtillus L. leaf and Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed coat extracts in diabetic rats by Sidorova Y1, Shipelin V2, Mazo V1, Zorin S1, Petrov N1, Kochetkova A. (PubMed)
(2) Anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effects of Vaccinium myrtillus fruit in experimentally induced diabetes (antidiabetic effect of Vaccinium myrtillus fruit) by Asgary S1, RafieianKopaei M2, Sahebkar A3, Shamsi F1, Goli-malekabadi N. (PubMed)

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